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You searched for +publisher:"University of New Mexico" +contributor:("Martin, Jamal"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New Mexico

1. Abouelhassan, Radi. The Impact of American Movies on Egyptian Cinema in 1950s and 1960s.

Degree: Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, 2009, University of New Mexico

The 1952 military coup in Egypt constituted the beginning of a new era in Egypts history and pushed forward substantial societal, economic and political changes. These changes represent the fruits of the revolutionary regime's pro-modernization ideology. In their search for modernity, the Egyptian elite invested in cinema as well as other forms of media and tended to follow the models of western countries. The strong relation between the Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser and the US, as well as the dominance of the American movies shown Egypt compared to other foreign cinematic industries at that time, directed the Egyptian elite toward Hollywood's model. This paper illustrates how Egyptian cinema was influenced by Hollywood in two ways; first, how to negatively represent ethnic minorities for the sake of creating a sense of national identity for the dominant race. Second, Egyptian cinema adopted certain American social values that were presented in Hollywood movies such as challenging gender roles in the family and promoting women's going out for work, for the sake of spreading modern ethics that would help overcome economic and social problems that Egypt was experiencing. To illustrate my argument, I have watched and theoretically analyzed over twenty Egyptian movies that were produced in the fifties and sixties and related them to western ethics that were presented in American movies. Advisors/Committee Members: Putnam, Walter, Lubin, Alex, Martin, Jamal.

Subjects/Keywords: Impact; Cinema; Egypt; USA

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Abouelhassan, R. (2009). The Impact of American Movies on Egyptian Cinema in 1950s and 1960s. (Masters Thesis). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1928/9867

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Abouelhassan, Radi. “The Impact of American Movies on Egyptian Cinema in 1950s and 1960s.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of New Mexico. Accessed March 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1928/9867.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Abouelhassan, Radi. “The Impact of American Movies on Egyptian Cinema in 1950s and 1960s.” 2009. Web. 18 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Abouelhassan R. The Impact of American Movies on Egyptian Cinema in 1950s and 1960s. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2009. [cited 2019 Mar 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/9867.

Council of Science Editors:

Abouelhassan R. The Impact of American Movies on Egyptian Cinema in 1950s and 1960s. [Masters Thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/9867


University of New Mexico

2. Ives, Lindsey. Case Not Closed: Whiteness and the Rhetorical Genres of Freedom Summer.

Degree: English, 2014, University of New Mexico

This dissertation examines the role of whiteness and its relationship to identification in rhetorical representations of the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Summer Project. Texts examined at length include recruitment materials, media coverage, pamphlets, and letters produced during the project, as well as retrospective representations of Freedom Summer in popular films and literature. Drawing upon Walter Beales pragmatic theory of rhetoric and Krista Ratcliffe's concept of rhetorical listening, it analyzes five perspectives on the hundreds of volunteers, most of whom were white college students, who traveled to black communities across Mississippi that summer in order to register voters, teach in Freedom Schools, work in community centers, and engage in other special projects. Analyzing the perspectives of white volunteers, black activists, white southerners, national media, and history, this dissertation reveals that the volunteers are variously constructed as admiring outsiders, neo-abolitionists, pseudo-scientists, community members, critical pedagogues, cherished children of the privileged classes, communist invaders, soldiers, missionaries, inconsequential extras, and catalysts for critical reflection. It concludes by suggesting ways in which contemporary teachers of rhetoric and composition might use selected Freedom Summer texts in the classroom in order to generate conversations about topics such as community engagement, interracial advocacy, and college students' writerly agency.' Advisors/Committee Members: Kells, Michelle Hall, Matthews, Kadeshia L., Paine, Chuck, Martin, Jamal, Ratcliffe, Krista.

Subjects/Keywords: Rhetoric; Freedom Summer; Civil Rights; Genre; Whiteness

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ives, L. (2014). Case Not Closed: Whiteness and the Rhetorical Genres of Freedom Summer. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1928/24320

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ives, Lindsey. “Case Not Closed: Whiteness and the Rhetorical Genres of Freedom Summer.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed March 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1928/24320.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ives, Lindsey. “Case Not Closed: Whiteness and the Rhetorical Genres of Freedom Summer.” 2014. Web. 18 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Ives L. Case Not Closed: Whiteness and the Rhetorical Genres of Freedom Summer. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2014. [cited 2019 Mar 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/24320.

Council of Science Editors:

Ives L. Case Not Closed: Whiteness and the Rhetorical Genres of Freedom Summer. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/24320

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