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You searched for +publisher:"University of New Mexico" +contributor:("Kodric-Brown, Astrid"). Showing records 1 – 12 of 12 total matches.

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University of New Mexico

1. Diver, Tracy. Disentangling Historical Biogeography and Anthropogenic Introductions: A Case Study of Red Shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis).

Degree: UNM Biology Department, 2013, University of New Mexico

 Aim: Determine evolutionary events that have shaped observed patterns of diversity in Red Shiner within the Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico. Location: Pecos, Delaware, Rio… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Miocene; Pliocene; divergent lineage; Red Shiner; Rio Grande; Coastal; Great Plains

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APA (6th Edition):

Diver, T. (2013). Disentangling Historical Biogeography and Anthropogenic Introductions: A Case Study of Red Shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis). (Masters Thesis). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/27

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Diver, Tracy. “Disentangling Historical Biogeography and Anthropogenic Introductions: A Case Study of Red Shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis).” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of New Mexico. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/27.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Diver, Tracy. “Disentangling Historical Biogeography and Anthropogenic Introductions: A Case Study of Red Shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis).” 2013. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Diver T. Disentangling Historical Biogeography and Anthropogenic Introductions: A Case Study of Red Shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/27.

Council of Science Editors:

Diver T. Disentangling Historical Biogeography and Anthropogenic Introductions: A Case Study of Red Shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis). [Masters Thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2013. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/27


University of New Mexico

2. Eppig, Christopher. Infectious disease and the worldwide distribution of IQ.

Degree: UNM Biology Department, 2011, University of New Mexico

 We show that infectious disease is a major contributor to the worldwide distribution of human cognitive ability, as measured by psychometric IQ. In areas where… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Intelligence; Development; Parasite-stress hypothesis; Hygiene hypothesis; Asthma; Developmental stability; Cognitive development; Life History; Brain growth; Flynn Effect; Parasites; Biogeography

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APA (6th Edition):

Eppig, C. (2011). Infectious disease and the worldwide distribution of IQ. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/32

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eppig, Christopher. “Infectious disease and the worldwide distribution of IQ.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/32.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eppig, Christopher. “Infectious disease and the worldwide distribution of IQ.” 2011. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Eppig C. Infectious disease and the worldwide distribution of IQ. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/32.

Council of Science Editors:

Eppig C. Infectious disease and the worldwide distribution of IQ. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2011. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/32


University of New Mexico

3. Hopkins, Alyssa. LIFE HISTORY AND MORPHOMETRIC VARIATION OF GAMBUSIA NOBILIS AT BITTER LAKE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE.

Degree: UNM Biology Department, 2013, University of New Mexico

 The Pecos Gambusia, Gambusia nobilis, is an endangered, live bearing fish inhabiting sinkholes in a restricted range of the Pecos River Watershed in New Mexico(more)

Subjects/Keywords: Gambusia; Life history; Morphometrics; Embryo; Reproduction; Ecology

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APA (6th Edition):

Hopkins, A. (2013). LIFE HISTORY AND MORPHOMETRIC VARIATION OF GAMBUSIA NOBILIS AT BITTER LAKE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE. (Masters Thesis). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/51

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hopkins, Alyssa. “LIFE HISTORY AND MORPHOMETRIC VARIATION OF GAMBUSIA NOBILIS AT BITTER LAKE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of New Mexico. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/51.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hopkins, Alyssa. “LIFE HISTORY AND MORPHOMETRIC VARIATION OF GAMBUSIA NOBILIS AT BITTER LAKE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE.” 2013. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hopkins A. LIFE HISTORY AND MORPHOMETRIC VARIATION OF GAMBUSIA NOBILIS AT BITTER LAKE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/51.

Council of Science Editors:

Hopkins A. LIFE HISTORY AND MORPHOMETRIC VARIATION OF GAMBUSIA NOBILIS AT BITTER LAKE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE. [Masters Thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2013. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/51


University of New Mexico

4. Hung, Angela. MHC and Mate Choice in Anolis sagrei.

Degree: UNM Biology Department, 2013, University of New Mexico

 The study of sexual selection saw its intrepid inception when Charles Darwin observed the earnest with which many male birds must court a female before… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: mate choice; sexual selection; Anolis sagrei; MHC; Cyprinodon

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APA (6th Edition):

Hung, A. (2013). MHC and Mate Choice in Anolis sagrei. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/53

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hung, Angela. “MHC and Mate Choice in Anolis sagrei.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/53.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hung, Angela. “MHC and Mate Choice in Anolis sagrei.” 2013. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hung A. MHC and Mate Choice in Anolis sagrei. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/53.

Council of Science Editors:

Hung A. MHC and Mate Choice in Anolis sagrei. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2013. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/53


University of New Mexico

5. West, Rhiannon. Sympatric speciation is reinforced by predation, parasite load, reproductive character displacement, and sexual selection in two species flocks of pupfish (Cyprinodon spp).

Degree: UNM Biology Department, 2013, University of New Mexico

 Sympatric speciation, the divergence of one lineage into two or more lineages within one geographic range, is often driven by disruptive selection on niche utilization.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: pupfish; character displacement; reproductive isolation; sympatric speciation; male and female mate choice; visual cues; parasite; predation; morphology

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APA (6th Edition):

West, R. (2013). Sympatric speciation is reinforced by predation, parasite load, reproductive character displacement, and sexual selection in two species flocks of pupfish (Cyprinodon spp). (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/112

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

West, Rhiannon. “Sympatric speciation is reinforced by predation, parasite load, reproductive character displacement, and sexual selection in two species flocks of pupfish (Cyprinodon spp).” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/112.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

West, Rhiannon. “Sympatric speciation is reinforced by predation, parasite load, reproductive character displacement, and sexual selection in two species flocks of pupfish (Cyprinodon spp).” 2013. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

West R. Sympatric speciation is reinforced by predation, parasite load, reproductive character displacement, and sexual selection in two species flocks of pupfish (Cyprinodon spp). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/112.

Council of Science Editors:

West R. Sympatric speciation is reinforced by predation, parasite load, reproductive character displacement, and sexual selection in two species flocks of pupfish (Cyprinodon spp). [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2013. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/112


University of New Mexico

6. Steinberg, Clare. Establishment of Larrea tridentata at the northern edge of the modern Mojave Desert: Insights from Neotoma paleomiddens.

Degree: UNM Biology Department, 2014, University of New Mexico

  Shifting climates affect the composition of biological communities. If environmental conditions change sufficiently, new species can invade, leading to large-scale community turnover. Understanding how… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Paleoecology; Neotoma; Death Valley; Plant Community; Macrofossils; creosote; Larrea tridentata; juniper; climate change; Juniperus osteosperma; Mojave Desert; Pleistocene; fossil; plant; Biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Steinberg, C. (2014). Establishment of Larrea tridentata at the northern edge of the modern Mojave Desert: Insights from Neotoma paleomiddens. (Masters Thesis). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/104

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Steinberg, Clare. “Establishment of Larrea tridentata at the northern edge of the modern Mojave Desert: Insights from Neotoma paleomiddens.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of New Mexico. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/104.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Steinberg, Clare. “Establishment of Larrea tridentata at the northern edge of the modern Mojave Desert: Insights from Neotoma paleomiddens.” 2014. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Steinberg C. Establishment of Larrea tridentata at the northern edge of the modern Mojave Desert: Insights from Neotoma paleomiddens. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/104.

Council of Science Editors:

Steinberg C. Establishment of Larrea tridentata at the northern edge of the modern Mojave Desert: Insights from Neotoma paleomiddens. [Masters Thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2014. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/104


University of New Mexico

7. Letendre, Kenneth. Variation and organization in social behavior : infectious disease and human intergroup conflict and warfare; and the organization of foraging behavior in harvester ants.

Degree: UNM Biology Department, 2012, University of New Mexico

 Social behavior is an important contributor to the success of widely distributed animal taxa, including such distantly related taxa as humans and ants. There is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: human warfare; competition; inter-group violence; political values; evolution; behavior; infectious disease; harvester ants; foraging ecology; agent-based modeling

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APA (6th Edition):

Letendre, K. (2012). Variation and organization in social behavior : infectious disease and human intergroup conflict and warfare; and the organization of foraging behavior in harvester ants. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/70

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Letendre, Kenneth. “Variation and organization in social behavior : infectious disease and human intergroup conflict and warfare; and the organization of foraging behavior in harvester ants.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/70.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Letendre, Kenneth. “Variation and organization in social behavior : infectious disease and human intergroup conflict and warfare; and the organization of foraging behavior in harvester ants.” 2012. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Letendre K. Variation and organization in social behavior : infectious disease and human intergroup conflict and warfare; and the organization of foraging behavior in harvester ants. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/70.

Council of Science Editors:

Letendre K. Variation and organization in social behavior : infectious disease and human intergroup conflict and warfare; and the organization of foraging behavior in harvester ants. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2012. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/70


University of New Mexico

8. Eadie, Elizabeth. Feeding Ecology and Life History Strategies of White-faced Capuchin Monkeys.

Degree: UNM Department of Anthropology, 2012, University of New Mexico

 Dietary niches have widespread effects on individuals life histories, behaviors, and morphologies. Capuchin monkeys inhabit a complex dietary niche that often entails hunting of relatively… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: primate; Cebus; capuchin; foraging; ecology; life history; feeding; Anthropology

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APA (6th Edition):

Eadie, E. (2012). Feeding Ecology and Life History Strategies of White-faced Capuchin Monkeys. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/anth_etds/20

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eadie, Elizabeth. “Feeding Ecology and Life History Strategies of White-faced Capuchin Monkeys.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/anth_etds/20.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eadie, Elizabeth. “Feeding Ecology and Life History Strategies of White-faced Capuchin Monkeys.” 2012. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Eadie E. Feeding Ecology and Life History Strategies of White-faced Capuchin Monkeys. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/anth_etds/20.

Council of Science Editors:

Eadie E. Feeding Ecology and Life History Strategies of White-faced Capuchin Monkeys. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2012. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/anth_etds/20


University of New Mexico

9. Swenton, Daniella M. Divergence in the ecology of two species of Gambusia in secondary contact.

Degree: UNM Biology Department, 2011, University of New Mexico

 Gambusia nobilis, a federally endangered species, and G. affinis (Poeciliidae) are small, livebearing fishes found in the southwestern U.S. The invasive G. affinis has been… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Gambusia; reproductive isolation; population genetics; hybridization; mate choice; stable isotopes; life history

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APA (6th Edition):

Swenton, D. M. (2011). Divergence in the ecology of two species of Gambusia in secondary contact. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/105

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Swenton, Daniella M. “Divergence in the ecology of two species of Gambusia in secondary contact.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/105.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Swenton, Daniella M. “Divergence in the ecology of two species of Gambusia in secondary contact.” 2011. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Swenton DM. Divergence in the ecology of two species of Gambusia in secondary contact. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/105.

Council of Science Editors:

Swenton DM. Divergence in the ecology of two species of Gambusia in secondary contact. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2011. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/105


University of New Mexico

10. Cleavall, Lauren. Description of Thermonectus nigrofasciatus and Rhantus binotatus (Coleoptera:Dytiscidae) mating behavior.

Degree: UNM Biology Department, 2009, University of New Mexico

 Models of sexual conflict predict that diving beetles should respond morphologically and behaviorally during mating events to overcome the opposing sex. Morphological and behavioral adaptations… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Dytiscidae; Mating behavior; Thermonectus nigrofasciatus; Rhantus binotatus

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APA (6th Edition):

Cleavall, L. (2009). Description of Thermonectus nigrofasciatus and Rhantus binotatus (Coleoptera:Dytiscidae) mating behavior. (Masters Thesis). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/16

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cleavall, Lauren. “Description of Thermonectus nigrofasciatus and Rhantus binotatus (Coleoptera:Dytiscidae) mating behavior.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of New Mexico. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/16.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cleavall, Lauren. “Description of Thermonectus nigrofasciatus and Rhantus binotatus (Coleoptera:Dytiscidae) mating behavior.” 2009. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Cleavall L. Description of Thermonectus nigrofasciatus and Rhantus binotatus (Coleoptera:Dytiscidae) mating behavior. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2009. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/16.

Council of Science Editors:

Cleavall L. Description of Thermonectus nigrofasciatus and Rhantus binotatus (Coleoptera:Dytiscidae) mating behavior. [Masters Thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2009. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/16


University of New Mexico

11. Edelman, Andrew. Dispersal, facilitation, and burrow architecture in banner-tailed kangaroo rats.

Degree: UNM Biology Department, 2010, University of New Mexico

 The largest and most dominant kangaroo rat species in the Chihuahuan Desert is the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis). This keystone species constructs mounds containing… (more)

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APA (6th Edition):

Edelman, A. (2010). Dispersal, facilitation, and burrow architecture in banner-tailed kangaroo rats. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/30

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Edelman, Andrew. “Dispersal, facilitation, and burrow architecture in banner-tailed kangaroo rats.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/30.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Edelman, Andrew. “Dispersal, facilitation, and burrow architecture in banner-tailed kangaroo rats.” 2010. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Edelman A. Dispersal, facilitation, and burrow architecture in banner-tailed kangaroo rats. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/30.

Council of Science Editors:

Edelman A. Dispersal, facilitation, and burrow architecture in banner-tailed kangaroo rats. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2010. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/30


University of New Mexico

12. McIntyre, Julie. Habitat variables, mammal interactions, and recovery approaches important to a rare, New Mexican butterfly, Euphydryas anicia cloudcrofti (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae).

Degree: UNM Biology Department, 2010, University of New Mexico

 This research investigated three study topics pertaining to the habitat and ecology of the Sacramento Mountains checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas anicia cloudcrofti) with the goal of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: butterfly; endemic; habitat; conservation

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APA (6th Edition):

McIntyre, J. (2010). Habitat variables, mammal interactions, and recovery approaches important to a rare, New Mexican butterfly, Euphydryas anicia cloudcrofti (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/78

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McIntyre, Julie. “Habitat variables, mammal interactions, and recovery approaches important to a rare, New Mexican butterfly, Euphydryas anicia cloudcrofti (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae).” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/78.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McIntyre, Julie. “Habitat variables, mammal interactions, and recovery approaches important to a rare, New Mexican butterfly, Euphydryas anicia cloudcrofti (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae).” 2010. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

McIntyre J. Habitat variables, mammal interactions, and recovery approaches important to a rare, New Mexican butterfly, Euphydryas anicia cloudcrofti (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/78.

Council of Science Editors:

McIntyre J. Habitat variables, mammal interactions, and recovery approaches important to a rare, New Mexican butterfly, Euphydryas anicia cloudcrofti (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2010. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/78

.