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You searched for +publisher:"University of New Mexico" +contributor:("Kency Cornejo"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New Mexico

1. Yalkin, Serda. Folk, the Naïve and Indigeneity: Defining Strategies in Violeta Parra's Visual Art.

Degree: UNM Department of Art and Art History, 2017, University of New Mexico

Since the decades following Violeta Parra’s death in 1967, the life and legacy of the folklorist, singer, poet, and visual artist has been mythologized in Chilean popular consciousness. Throughout her career, which spanned the 1940s to the 1960s, Parra launched a widespread folkloric project for the purpose of the recovery, compilation, transcription, performance, and study of the music, poetry, rituals, proverbs, folktales, and material objects of the diverse regions of Chile. She recorded and performed original music utilizing traditional rural instruments with socially critical lyrics that denounced the injustices suffered by the oppressed sectors of Chilean society, a demographic with which she identified. Parra’s approach to music solidified her role as the “godmother” of Nueva Canción, the pervasive protest song movement that combined folk inspired melodies with socially committed lyrics from the mid-1960s to the early 1970s, a period marked by increased grassroots organization and leftist mobilization leading up to and through the brief presidency of Salvador Allende (1970-3). Despite the proliferation of scholarship on her poetry, song, and folkloric endeavors, however, studies focused exclusively on her visual art have been limited. Parra’s embroideries on burlap or arpilleras, paintings, and sculptures are virtually absent from the pages of Chilean and Latin American art history. Consequently, the development of this thesis has been guided by the question: What were the active systems and agents of ‘forgetting’ or erasure in place at the time of Parra’s career, and how do they still permeate the study of her visual art? One answer explored here is predicated on the fact that throughout the period that Parra produced art—as well as posthumously—it has been classified as folk, naïve, and instinctive. This project, however, is not simply an act of recovery or an attempt to reclaim Parra’s artistic career within Chilean and global art history. Moreover, it is not focused on refuting the classification of Parra’s visual art as “folk” or “naïve” and arguing alternatively for its place within avant-garde or “modern” currents in the twentieth-century. Instead, this thesis is geared toward addressing the structurally negative relationships and notions of exclusion that permeate the specific contexts of Parra’s artistic reception. I do this by identifying three strategies—folk, the naïve, and indigeneity—Parra employed and the various contexts that informed them. Ultimately, they reveal decolonial approaches with which Parra worked against the legacy of cultural imperialism. By exploring these strategies and seeing them as vital products of the social, political, and artistic contexts in which Parra lived and worked, the more difficult it becomes to overlook her contribution to the cultural climate of mid-twentieth century Chile and beyond. Advisors/Committee Members: Kirsten Pai Buick, Elizabeth Hutchison, Kency Cornejo, Holly Bartnet-Sánchez.

Subjects/Keywords: Violeta Parra; Chile; Latin American art; folk; decolonial; indigeneity; History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

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APA (6th Edition):

Yalkin, S. (2017). Folk, the Naïve and Indigeneity: Defining Strategies in Violeta Parra's Visual Art. (Masters Thesis). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/arth_etds/61

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yalkin, Serda. “Folk, the Naïve and Indigeneity: Defining Strategies in Violeta Parra's Visual Art.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of New Mexico. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/arth_etds/61.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yalkin, Serda. “Folk, the Naïve and Indigeneity: Defining Strategies in Violeta Parra's Visual Art.” 2017. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Yalkin S. Folk, the Naïve and Indigeneity: Defining Strategies in Violeta Parra's Visual Art. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/arth_etds/61.

Council of Science Editors:

Yalkin S. Folk, the Naïve and Indigeneity: Defining Strategies in Violeta Parra's Visual Art. [Masters Thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2017. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/arth_etds/61


University of New Mexico

2. Courtney, Chloë L. Arts of Resistance: Ecologic History and Contemporary Interventions in the Valley of Mexico.

Degree: UNM Department of Art and Art History, 2018, University of New Mexico

This thesis analyzes two contemporary artworks concerning Mexico City’s complex socio-ecologic history: the installation The Return of a Lake (2012), by Maria Thereza Alves, and the performance Plan Acalote (2015) by the collective Plan Acalli (Carlos Huitzil and Ehecatl Morales). Mexico City faces land subsidence, flooding, and water shortages. Systemic power imbalances and ongoing efforts to transform a wetland landscape to a city conforming to Eurocentric ideals concentrate these problems in marginal communities. Using strategies of eco-criticism, decolonial thought, and performance studies, I argue that The Return of a Lake and Plan Acalote link broad social and ecologic problems with the daily realities of Mexico City’s inhabitants, restructure perceptions of urban space, and forge community solidarity, imagining future environmental justice in the Valley of Mexico. Both artworks connect with local communities, creating reciprocal relationships. I consider how these relationships demonstrate art’s capacity to reframe discourses of urbanity and the environment. Further, I analyze The Return of a Lake’s use of indigenous cosmology to connect today’s struggle for justice with colonial history. Finally, I address the importance of the bodily experience of urban space, and mourning as a response to environmental devastation. Plan Acalote and The Return of a Lake demonstrate that when community-based artworks are rooted in networks of solidarity honoring local histories of injustice and resistance, they offer new ways of seeing and thinking about extraction and predatory development in colonized places, and support collective efforts toward environmental justice and local autonomy. Advisors/Committee Members: Kency Cornejo, Ray Hernández-Durán, Kirsten Buick, Szu-Han Ho.

Subjects/Keywords: performance art; installation art; participatory art; Mexico City; decoloniality; ecologic history; History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Courtney, C. L. (2018). Arts of Resistance: Ecologic History and Contemporary Interventions in the Valley of Mexico. (Masters Thesis). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/arth_etds/81

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Courtney, Chloë L. “Arts of Resistance: Ecologic History and Contemporary Interventions in the Valley of Mexico.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of New Mexico. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/arth_etds/81.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Courtney, Chloë L. “Arts of Resistance: Ecologic History and Contemporary Interventions in the Valley of Mexico.” 2018. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Courtney CL. Arts of Resistance: Ecologic History and Contemporary Interventions in the Valley of Mexico. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/arth_etds/81.

Council of Science Editors:

Courtney CL. Arts of Resistance: Ecologic History and Contemporary Interventions in the Valley of Mexico. [Masters Thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2018. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/arth_etds/81

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