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You searched for +publisher:"University of New Hampshire" +contributor:("Shadi Atallah"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Healy, Christine. MOOSE HABITAT USE DURING CRITICAL PERIODS IN THE WINTER TICK LIFECYCLE AND AGENT-BASED MODELING OF MOOSE-WINTER TICK RELATIONSHIPS IN NORTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Degree: MS, 2018, University of New Hampshire

High calf mortality has been documented in North American moose (Alces alces) populations along the southern extent of their range; in New England, this has been attributed to winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus) parasitism. This research was conducted to better understand moose activity during critical periods in the winter tick life cycle, and to assess the potential of simulation models in managing moose against future epizootics. Seasonal habitat use was measured using geospatial analyses of locational data from radio-marked animals at 3 sites in New Hampshire and Maine. An agent-based model, spatially explicit to two subsections of the New Hampshire field site (Success and Jericho), was then constructed to simulate the role of moose density, weather events, winter tick abundance and aggregation, and proportion of available optimal habitat on % mortality and tick infestation level of dead calves. The average size of home and core ranges generally increased from south to north, following the population gradient. Optimal habitat was the only land cover type used above its availability (1.1-2.1X availability in home range, 1.2-3.1X availability in core range), regardless of season or site, indicating that moose were selecting for this cover type during questing and drop-off periods of winter ticks. The proportional overlap of cut habitat in home and core ranges exceeded the absolute proportion in home and core ranges. It is expected that temporal use of optimal habitat exceeds the geospatial estimates because 30-40% of the daily activity of moose is spent foraging. The high proportion of time spent foraging within optimal habitat that is available in disproportionately low proportion (< 20%) across the landscape suggests that high concentrations of winter ticks are available in this cover type. The model was parameterized using empirical data acquired from the literature and results of the current field study. Of 58 combinations of variables, 17 produced epizootic events (calf mortality > 50%), of which 15 occurred in Jericho where the availability of optimal habitat was higher (28%) than the study site average (17%). Averages of the two sites under conditions representative of the current moose density and recent weather conditions yielded similar, albeit lower, calf mortality (53-66%) and infestation level (37,635 ticks/calf) than measured in the field study (~70% calf mortality, 48,600 ticks/calf). Winter tick abundance and aggregation both influenced the occurrence and severity of infestation and mortality at each site. While the model used a conservative approach with regard to several parameters (e.g., moose activity, winter tick abundance, % ticks that desiccate during drought, and moose density), it produced patterns and trends congruent with those calculated during the field study, and demonstrated the future management potential of this method. Advisors/Committee Members: Russell G Congalton, Shadi Atallah.

Subjects/Keywords: Agent-Based Modeling; GIS; Home range; Moose; Winter Ticks; Wildlife conservation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Healy, C. (2018). MOOSE HABITAT USE DURING CRITICAL PERIODS IN THE WINTER TICK LIFECYCLE AND AGENT-BASED MODELING OF MOOSE-WINTER TICK RELATIONSHIPS IN NORTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE. (Thesis). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1205

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Healy, Christine. “MOOSE HABITAT USE DURING CRITICAL PERIODS IN THE WINTER TICK LIFECYCLE AND AGENT-BASED MODELING OF MOOSE-WINTER TICK RELATIONSHIPS IN NORTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE.” 2018. Thesis, University of New Hampshire. Accessed June 04, 2020. https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1205.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Healy, Christine. “MOOSE HABITAT USE DURING CRITICAL PERIODS IN THE WINTER TICK LIFECYCLE AND AGENT-BASED MODELING OF MOOSE-WINTER TICK RELATIONSHIPS IN NORTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE.” 2018. Web. 04 Jun 2020.

Vancouver:

Healy C. MOOSE HABITAT USE DURING CRITICAL PERIODS IN THE WINTER TICK LIFECYCLE AND AGENT-BASED MODELING OF MOOSE-WINTER TICK RELATIONSHIPS IN NORTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2018. [cited 2020 Jun 04]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1205.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Healy C. MOOSE HABITAT USE DURING CRITICAL PERIODS IN THE WINTER TICK LIFECYCLE AND AGENT-BASED MODELING OF MOOSE-WINTER TICK RELATIONSHIPS IN NORTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE. [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2018. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1205

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. McGinnis, Ian. Households' Preferences and Willingness to Pay for Hydrological Services in Veracruz, Mexico.

Degree: MS, 2019, University of New Hampshire

Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) are transfer payments from governing bodies, households, firms, or non-governmental organizations to incentivize natural resource owners and managers to carry out environmental conservation efforts that promote the provision of ecosystem services. PES programs targeting reduction of deforestation have gained popularity due to the extensive ecosystem services of forests including carbon storage, wildlife habitat, biodiversity, and the provision of hydrological services (HS), the ecosystem services that provide benefits such as water quality improvement, water damage mitigation, and non-use value. There is evidence in the literature that PES programs, while theoretically beneficial, face issues with long-term financial sustainability (Nava-Lopez et al., 2018). An increase in financing can be achieved through the introduction of a fee in the water bill of water users. However, these fees are often chosen arbitrarily without any rigorous assessment of households’ willingness-to-pay (WTP) for HS provided upstream (i.e., by forest landowners upstream from the cities) and little is known about the preferences of these households. This paper aims to estimate the value consumers have for HS through the use of a choice experiment (CE). The use of a CE allows us to elicit the preferences of the consumers of HS with respect to both the cost and the attributes of the PES program. We choose the state of Veracruz to conduct the CE because it is one of the most intensely deforested states that also struggles with both water quality and water damage issues. (Nava-Lopez et al., 2018). We developed and administered an in-person, tablet-based CE in October 2018 which used five attributes to describe the hypothetical Payments for Hydrological Services (PHS) program: Water Quality, Water Regulation Services, Eligible Land, Program Administration, and Fee. We obtained a sample of 777 observations, split between representative samples of Xalapa and Coatepec, the two cities of the state that have experience with hydrological PES programs. Water Quality and Water Regulation Services are the two attributes thought to be the main benefits that consumers would be interested in. Eligible Land has a policy implication because local governments are interested in increasing the eligibility to include shade-grown coffee. Program Administration will allow us to estimate whether consumer’s support for such PES program depends on the type of institution managing it. Fee is a variable with options 5, 20, 40, and 80 MXN per month, the amount added to household’s water bill to pay for the program. In this thesis, we construct conditional logit and mixed logit models to analyze discrete choice data. The results show that for the four non-monetary … Advisors/Committee Members: Shadi Atallah, Kelly Giraud, Ju-Chin Huang.

Subjects/Keywords: Choice Experiment; Ecosystem Service Valuation; Hydrological Services; Non-market Valuation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McGinnis, I. (2019). Households' Preferences and Willingness to Pay for Hydrological Services in Veracruz, Mexico. (Thesis). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1278

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McGinnis, Ian. “Households' Preferences and Willingness to Pay for Hydrological Services in Veracruz, Mexico.” 2019. Thesis, University of New Hampshire. Accessed June 04, 2020. https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1278.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McGinnis, Ian. “Households' Preferences and Willingness to Pay for Hydrological Services in Veracruz, Mexico.” 2019. Web. 04 Jun 2020.

Vancouver:

McGinnis I. Households' Preferences and Willingness to Pay for Hydrological Services in Veracruz, Mexico. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2019. [cited 2020 Jun 04]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1278.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McGinnis I. Households' Preferences and Willingness to Pay for Hydrological Services in Veracruz, Mexico. [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2019. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1278

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Siddique, Talha. Agrobiodiversity For Pest Management: An Integrated Bioeconomic Simulation and Machine Learning Approach.

Degree: MS, 2019, University of New Hampshire

A pressing challenge of modern agriculture is to develop means of decreasing the negative impacts of pesticides while maintaining low pest pressure and high crop yield. Certain crop varieties, especially wild relatives of domesticated crops, provide pest regulation ecosystem services through chemical defense mechanisms. Benefits from these ecosystem service can be realized by intercropping cash crops with repellent wild varieties to reduce pest pressure. An opportunity cost exists, however, which consists of lower yield and market value. Such is the case of heirloom apple varieties that are more resistant to the codling moth but have a lower market value compared to commercial apples such as Red Delicious and Gala. In this thesis, I first develop a model to identify the bioeconomically optimal intercropping level of commercial and wild varieties with the purpose of pest management in the specific case of the codling moth. Second, I develop a model that uses a machine learning technique to determine pesticide application policies for the multi-variety orchard, where the solution is robust to model and data uncertainty. Model 1 is a tree-level, spatially-explicit, bioeconomic simulation model. In the baseline case, we find that the bioeconomically optimal variety mix consists of 20% cider variety and 80% commercial variety. We analyze the sensitivity of the optimal mix to the market price difference of the two apple varieties and find that the optimal proportion of cider decreases linearly and that 100% commercial variety is optimal if the price difference is greater than $0.3/lb. We consider eight different spatial configurations for the intercropping, in addition to the baseline random spatial intercropping and find that the diagonal configuration yields the highest net present value and requires the lowest amount of cider intercropping (4%). Random spatial intercropping, in contrast, ranks seventh and has the second-highest optimal proportion of cider (30%). We use the certainty equivalent measure to determine how the optimal mix changes for a grower who has a moderate level of risk aversion, where production risk is driven by the effect of temperature on codling moth infestation over the years. The optimal cider variety percentage for a moderately risk-averse grower increases to 38% compared to the baseline case of 20% of a risk-neutral grower. We also document the risk-reducing effect of apple agrobiodiversity by characterizing how the risk premium decreases with increasing proportions of cider. In Model 2, we determine the robust optimal pesticide application threshold, given an infested multi-variety orchard consisting of the optimal proportion of cider varieties, arranged in a random spatial configuration. We use historical degree-day (DD) data and associated established DD threshold-based spray recommendations to add pesticide application features to our Model 1 and then use it as a simulator to generate data on infestation and damage level over time. We then use Reinforcement Learning (RL) to… Advisors/Committee Members: Shadi Atallah, Marek Petrik, Jeffrey Garnas.

Subjects/Keywords: Agrobiodiversity; Bioeconomic modelling; Machine Learning; Multi-variety orchard; Pest Control; Reinforcement Learning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Siddique, T. (2019). Agrobiodiversity For Pest Management: An Integrated Bioeconomic Simulation and Machine Learning Approach. (Thesis). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1332

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Siddique, Talha. “Agrobiodiversity For Pest Management: An Integrated Bioeconomic Simulation and Machine Learning Approach.” 2019. Thesis, University of New Hampshire. Accessed June 04, 2020. https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1332.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Siddique, Talha. “Agrobiodiversity For Pest Management: An Integrated Bioeconomic Simulation and Machine Learning Approach.” 2019. Web. 04 Jun 2020.

Vancouver:

Siddique T. Agrobiodiversity For Pest Management: An Integrated Bioeconomic Simulation and Machine Learning Approach. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2019. [cited 2020 Jun 04]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1332.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Siddique T. Agrobiodiversity For Pest Management: An Integrated Bioeconomic Simulation and Machine Learning Approach. [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2019. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1332

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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