Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of New Hampshire" +contributor:("Michel Charpentier"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Brown, Jonathan W. Adaptive Network on Chip Routing using the Turn Model.

Degree: MS, 2013, University of New Hampshire

To create a viable network on chip, many technical challenges need to be solved. One of the aspects of solutions is the routing algorithm: how to route packets from one component (e.g., core CPU) to another without deadlock or livelock while avoiding congestion or faulty routers. Routing algorithms must deal with these problems while remaining simple enough to keep the hardware cost low. We have created a simple to implement, deadlock free, and livelock free routing algorithm that addresses these challenges. This routing algorithm, Weighted Non-Minimal OddEven (WeNMOE), gathers information on the state of the network (congestion/faults) from surrounding routers. The algorithm then uses this information to estimate a routing cost and routes down the path with the lowest estimated cost. A simulator was developed and used to study the performance and to compare the new routing algorithm against other state of the art routing algorithms. This simulator emulates bit reverse, complement, transpose, hotspots, and uniform random traffic patterns and measures the average latency of delivered packets. The results of the simulations showed that WeNMOE outperformed most routing algorithms. The only exception was the XY routing algorithm on uniform random and complement traffic. In these traffic patterns, the traffic load is uniformly distributed, limiting the opportunity for an improved route selection by WeNMOE. Advisors/Committee Members: Michel Charpentier.

Subjects/Keywords: Computer Science; Computer Science

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brown, J. W. (2013). Adaptive Network on Chip Routing using the Turn Model. (Thesis). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/779

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brown, Jonathan W. “Adaptive Network on Chip Routing using the Turn Model.” 2013. Thesis, University of New Hampshire. Accessed June 20, 2019. https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/779.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brown, Jonathan W. “Adaptive Network on Chip Routing using the Turn Model.” 2013. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Brown JW. Adaptive Network on Chip Routing using the Turn Model. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2013. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/779.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Brown JW. Adaptive Network on Chip Routing using the Turn Model. [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2013. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/779

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Hebert, Chris. Inferring Types to Eliminate Ownership Checks in an Intentional JavaScript Compiler.

Degree: MS, 2015, University of New Hampshire

Concurrent programs are notoriously difficult to develop due to the non-deterministic nature of thread scheduling. It is desirable to have a programming language to make such development easier. Tscript comprises such a system. Tscript is an extension of JavaScript that provides multithreading support along with intent specification. These intents allow a programmer to specify how parts of the program interact in a multithreaded context. However, enforcing intents requires run-time memory checks which can be inefficient. This thesis implements an optimization in the Tscript compiler that seeks to improve this inefficiency through static analysis. Our approach utilizes both type inference and dataflow analysis to eliminate unnecessary run-time checks. Advisors/Committee Members: Phil Hatcher, Michel Charpentier, Wheeler Ruml.

Subjects/Keywords: compiler; javascript; optimization; Computer science

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hebert, C. (2015). Inferring Types to Eliminate Ownership Checks in an Intentional JavaScript Compiler. (Thesis). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1021

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hebert, Chris. “Inferring Types to Eliminate Ownership Checks in an Intentional JavaScript Compiler.” 2015. Thesis, University of New Hampshire. Accessed June 20, 2019. https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hebert, Chris. “Inferring Types to Eliminate Ownership Checks in an Intentional JavaScript Compiler.” 2015. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Hebert C. Inferring Types to Eliminate Ownership Checks in an Intentional JavaScript Compiler. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hebert C. Inferring Types to Eliminate Ownership Checks in an Intentional JavaScript Compiler. [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2015. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1021

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Li, Ying. INTERMITTENTLY CONNECTED DELAY-TOLERANT WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of New Hampshire

Intermittently Connected Delay-Tolerant Wireless Sensor Networks (ICDT-WSNs), a branch of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), have features of WSNs and the intermittent connectivity of Opportunistic Networks. The applications of ICDT-WSNs are increasing in recent years; however, the communication protocols suitable for this category of networks often fall short. Most of the existing communication protocols are designed for either WSNs or Opportunistic Networks with sufficient resources and tend to be inadequate for direct use in ICDT-WSNs. In this dissertation, we study ICDT-WSNs from the perspective of the characteristics, chal- lenges and possible solutions. A high-level overview of ICDT-WSNs is given, followed by a study of existing work and our solutions to address the problems of routing, flow control, error control, and storage management. The proposed solutions utilize the utility level of nodes and the connectedness of a network. In addition to the protocols for information transmissions to specific destinations, we also propose efficient mechanisms for information dissemination to arbitrary destinations. The study shows that our proposed solutions can achieve better performance than other state of the art communication protocols without sacrificing energy efficiency. Advisors/Committee Members: Radim Bartos, R. Daniel Bergeron, Michel Charpentier.

Subjects/Keywords: Computer science

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Li, Y. (2015). INTERMITTENTLY CONNECTED DELAY-TOLERANT WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/2199

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Li, Ying. “INTERMITTENTLY CONNECTED DELAY-TOLERANT WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Hampshire. Accessed June 20, 2019. https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/2199.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Li, Ying. “INTERMITTENTLY CONNECTED DELAY-TOLERANT WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS.” 2015. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Li Y. INTERMITTENTLY CONNECTED DELAY-TOLERANT WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Hampshire; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/2199.

Council of Science Editors:

Li Y. INTERMITTENTLY CONNECTED DELAY-TOLERANT WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Hampshire; 2015. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/2199

.