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You searched for +publisher:"University of New Hampshire" +contributor:("Michael Middleton"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Koritz, Kirsten Nerissa. Linking goals to outcomes: Exploring students' achievement goals, strategy use, and standards of success for learning.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of New Hampshire

This study explored stability in achievement goals and learning behaviors within a two-part learning project. Based on previous literature exploring stability in achievement goal orientation, it was hypothesized that students' goals and self-efficacy would show evidence of change within and between the two task sessions. This was tested through a series of self-report surveys. Literature on the relationship between achievement goals and reading strategies showed that mastery oriented students used more reading strategies than performance oriented students. This was tested by imposing a performance oriented measure on one half of the participants. Data was analyzed with quantitative methods. Findings from this study supported only the first hypothesis. Goals and self-efficacy showed evidence of instability within and between the two sessions. However, students in both the performance and mastery conditions used similar learning behaviors. This suggests learning projects are an important area on which motivation research should continue to focus. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael Middleton.

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Educational Psychology; Education; Reading; Psychology; Cognitive

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Koritz, K. N. (2011). Linking goals to outcomes: Exploring students' achievement goals, strategy use, and standards of success for learning. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/558

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koritz, Kirsten Nerissa. “Linking goals to outcomes: Exploring students' achievement goals, strategy use, and standards of success for learning.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Hampshire. Accessed April 26, 2019. https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/558.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koritz, Kirsten Nerissa. “Linking goals to outcomes: Exploring students' achievement goals, strategy use, and standards of success for learning.” 2011. Web. 26 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Koritz KN. Linking goals to outcomes: Exploring students' achievement goals, strategy use, and standards of success for learning. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Hampshire; 2011. [cited 2019 Apr 26]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/558.

Council of Science Editors:

Koritz KN. Linking goals to outcomes: Exploring students' achievement goals, strategy use, and standards of success for learning. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Hampshire; 2011. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/558

2. Young, Michael. An Analysis of Appreciative Inquiry as Organizational Development for an Alternative School.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of New Hampshire

Schools and youth development programs are continually under pressure to reform and improve. Recent scholarship in the organizational development field suggests that a post modern approach to such efforts may yield new and generative results. Appreciative Inquiry (AI) is an Action Research methodology used for organizational development that is based on a number of post modern assumptions. Because AI has seen a rapid increase in use, including implementations in educational settings, and because of its potential to offer new insights into organizational development, a further understanding of how it works is warranted. This interpretive case study, grounded in a social constructionist conceptual framework, uses a discourse analysis methodology to explore the linguistic possibilities AI offers participants. By exploring the presence of accounts, repair sequences, and the use of laughter and humor within the discourse recorded during an AI process facilitated by the researcher at an alternative school, the study empirically demonstrates the presence of an appreciative interpretive repertoire (or way of talking) as evidence of the AI process at work. The appreciative approach is not fully accepted however, and the implications of this partial rejection are discussed in relation to the stressed and often crisis driven nature of schools and programs serving alternative populations. Also discussed is the mediating influence on AI of a broader and complimentary Positive Youth Development Discourse previously present at the school and likely present in other similar schools and programs as well. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael Middleton.

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Evaluation; Speech Communication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Young, M. (2011). An Analysis of Appreciative Inquiry as Organizational Development for an Alternative School. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/565

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Young, Michael. “An Analysis of Appreciative Inquiry as Organizational Development for an Alternative School.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Hampshire. Accessed April 26, 2019. https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/565.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Young, Michael. “An Analysis of Appreciative Inquiry as Organizational Development for an Alternative School.” 2011. Web. 26 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Young M. An Analysis of Appreciative Inquiry as Organizational Development for an Alternative School. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Hampshire; 2011. [cited 2019 Apr 26]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/565.

Council of Science Editors:

Young M. An Analysis of Appreciative Inquiry as Organizational Development for an Alternative School. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Hampshire; 2011. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/565

3. Rheingold, Alison Ann. Stories worth telling: How one school navigates tensions between innovation and standards.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of New Hampshire

This dissertation examines the cultural practice of assessment at King Middle School, a grades 6 – 8 school in Portland, Maine. I trace this school's reform efforts over 23 years, within the current development of school-wide practices over time, in relation to making work public. I used a sociocultural framework, which allowed for an examination of the situation-as-a-whole, to see learning as distributed among people, time and objects, and to view artifacts of student work as boundary objects  – sites of negotiation among people from different, but related, social worlds. A sociocultural perspective also allowed for an expansive notion of assessment that included not just individual classroom strategies or school-wide practices, but also the system of assessment across communities. I adopted a grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis. My research yielded a mid-level theory about how sharing work with audiences – and the resulting recognition – shapes students, teachers, institutions and communities. Accordingly, this theory also describes a dialectic process – how institutions, communities, teachers and students shape the cultural practice of assessment. In line with a sociocultural perspective, I also found that recognition was not simply something produced through student work, but was an inherent feature of the activity. In conclusion, I share implications on three levels: conceptual, methodological and practical. Conceptually, I offer a developmental understanding of recognition in which recognition can be seen as a rich site of acknowledgement for contributions to, and membership in, communities. My practical findings include recommendations for policy, schools and classrooms such as: (1) Allowing multiple types of evidence to 'count' as measures of academic achievement; (2) intentionally perforating the traditional boundaries of school; (3) creating opportunities for students to engage in reciprocal caring; and (4) seeing assessment as integral to, rather than separate from, learning. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael Middleton.

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Middle School

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rheingold, A. A. (2011). Stories worth telling: How one school navigates tensions between innovation and standards. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/632

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rheingold, Alison Ann. “Stories worth telling: How one school navigates tensions between innovation and standards.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Hampshire. Accessed April 26, 2019. https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/632.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rheingold, Alison Ann. “Stories worth telling: How one school navigates tensions between innovation and standards.” 2011. Web. 26 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Rheingold AA. Stories worth telling: How one school navigates tensions between innovation and standards. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Hampshire; 2011. [cited 2019 Apr 26]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/632.

Council of Science Editors:

Rheingold AA. Stories worth telling: How one school navigates tensions between innovation and standards. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Hampshire; 2011. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/dissertation/632

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