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You searched for +publisher:"University of New Hampshire" +contributor:("Jeffrey Garnas"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Brydon-Williams, Rhys Thomas. DISTRIBUTION, PRESENCE, ECOLOGY, AND HARVEST DYNAMICS OF THE CHAGA FUNGUS (INONOTUS OBLIQUUS) IN THE WHITE MOUNTAIN NATIONAL FOREST.

Degree: MS, 2019, University of New Hampshire

Inonotus obliquus is a fungal infection of birch trees that produces a large sterile conk, known colloquially as Chaga. When dried, Chaga has medicinal value as an anti-mutagen and for gastro-peptic relief. With the growth of the natural remedies market over the last decade, Chaga has increasingly become the target of harvest in the White Mountain National Forest (WMNF). Forest managers of the WMNF have asked USFS Forest Health Protection staff whether special use permitting for Chaga as a Non-Timber Forest Product (NTFP) should be allowed. However, it is difficult to make management recommendations or best management practices for harvesting Chaga because the abundance and ecology of the Chaga resource in the WMNF is currently unknown. This project sought to quantify the Chaga resource in the WMNF and determine incidence of Chaga by tree species, habitat type, and other variables. Two surveys were conducted in the 2017 and 2018 field seasons, with a total of 66 sites and 2,611 birch trees sampled across the WMNF. These surveys found positive correlations between Chaga presence and birch tree age, diameter at breast height, and site elevation. Chaga was also disproportionately associated with yellow birch. Chaga frequency in WMNF birch trees was low: only 2% of trees sampled had a visible Chaga conk. However, Chaga was present in 56% of stands surveyed. In addition, Chaga infections were seen to cluster together in four separate areas surveyed. There was no clear correlation between Chaga presence and either stand-level species composition or annual basal area increment. Additional damages to infected trees only associated with Chaga presence insofar as said damages resulted from Chaga presence. In summation, Chaga, while comparatively rare, is widely distributed across the WMNF and tends to prefer older, large-diameter yellow birches at higher elevations as hosts. These results will ultimately be used to craft a series of Best Management Practices (BMPs) for Chaga harvest with a better understanding of the fungus’ preferred habitat and potential for cultivation. Advisors/Committee Members: Heidi Asbjornsen, Isabel Munck, Jeffrey Garnas.

Subjects/Keywords: Birch; Chaga; Conk; Forest; Fungus; Pathogen

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brydon-Williams, R. T. (2019). DISTRIBUTION, PRESENCE, ECOLOGY, AND HARVEST DYNAMICS OF THE CHAGA FUNGUS (INONOTUS OBLIQUUS) IN THE WHITE MOUNTAIN NATIONAL FOREST. (Thesis). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1269

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brydon-Williams, Rhys Thomas. “DISTRIBUTION, PRESENCE, ECOLOGY, AND HARVEST DYNAMICS OF THE CHAGA FUNGUS (INONOTUS OBLIQUUS) IN THE WHITE MOUNTAIN NATIONAL FOREST.” 2019. Thesis, University of New Hampshire. Accessed June 04, 2020. https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1269.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brydon-Williams, Rhys Thomas. “DISTRIBUTION, PRESENCE, ECOLOGY, AND HARVEST DYNAMICS OF THE CHAGA FUNGUS (INONOTUS OBLIQUUS) IN THE WHITE MOUNTAIN NATIONAL FOREST.” 2019. Web. 04 Jun 2020.

Vancouver:

Brydon-Williams RT. DISTRIBUTION, PRESENCE, ECOLOGY, AND HARVEST DYNAMICS OF THE CHAGA FUNGUS (INONOTUS OBLIQUUS) IN THE WHITE MOUNTAIN NATIONAL FOREST. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2019. [cited 2020 Jun 04]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1269.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Brydon-Williams RT. DISTRIBUTION, PRESENCE, ECOLOGY, AND HARVEST DYNAMICS OF THE CHAGA FUNGUS (INONOTUS OBLIQUUS) IN THE WHITE MOUNTAIN NATIONAL FOREST. [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2019. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1269

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Siddique, Talha. Agrobiodiversity For Pest Management: An Integrated Bioeconomic Simulation and Machine Learning Approach.

Degree: MS, 2019, University of New Hampshire

A pressing challenge of modern agriculture is to develop means of decreasing the negative impacts of pesticides while maintaining low pest pressure and high crop yield. Certain crop varieties, especially wild relatives of domesticated crops, provide pest regulation ecosystem services through chemical defense mechanisms. Benefits from these ecosystem service can be realized by intercropping cash crops with repellent wild varieties to reduce pest pressure. An opportunity cost exists, however, which consists of lower yield and market value. Such is the case of heirloom apple varieties that are more resistant to the codling moth but have a lower market value compared to commercial apples such as Red Delicious and Gala. In this thesis, I first develop a model to identify the bioeconomically optimal intercropping level of commercial and wild varieties with the purpose of pest management in the specific case of the codling moth. Second, I develop a model that uses a machine learning technique to determine pesticide application policies for the multi-variety orchard, where the solution is robust to model and data uncertainty. Model 1 is a tree-level, spatially-explicit, bioeconomic simulation model. In the baseline case, we find that the bioeconomically optimal variety mix consists of 20% cider variety and 80% commercial variety. We analyze the sensitivity of the optimal mix to the market price difference of the two apple varieties and find that the optimal proportion of cider decreases linearly and that 100% commercial variety is optimal if the price difference is greater than $0.3/lb. We consider eight different spatial configurations for the intercropping, in addition to the baseline random spatial intercropping and find that the diagonal configuration yields the highest net present value and requires the lowest amount of cider intercropping (4%). Random spatial intercropping, in contrast, ranks seventh and has the second-highest optimal proportion of cider (30%). We use the certainty equivalent measure to determine how the optimal mix changes for a grower who has a moderate level of risk aversion, where production risk is driven by the effect of temperature on codling moth infestation over the years. The optimal cider variety percentage for a moderately risk-averse grower increases to 38% compared to the baseline case of 20% of a risk-neutral grower. We also document the risk-reducing effect of apple agrobiodiversity by characterizing how the risk premium decreases with increasing proportions of cider. In Model 2, we determine the robust optimal pesticide application threshold, given an infested multi-variety orchard consisting of the optimal proportion of cider varieties, arranged in a random spatial configuration. We use historical degree-day (DD) data and associated established DD threshold-based spray recommendations to add pesticide application features to our Model 1 and then use it as a simulator to generate data on infestation and damage level over time. We then use Reinforcement Learning (RL) to… Advisors/Committee Members: Shadi Atallah, Marek Petrik, Jeffrey Garnas.

Subjects/Keywords: Agrobiodiversity; Bioeconomic modelling; Machine Learning; Multi-variety orchard; Pest Control; Reinforcement Learning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Siddique, T. (2019). Agrobiodiversity For Pest Management: An Integrated Bioeconomic Simulation and Machine Learning Approach. (Thesis). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1332

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Siddique, Talha. “Agrobiodiversity For Pest Management: An Integrated Bioeconomic Simulation and Machine Learning Approach.” 2019. Thesis, University of New Hampshire. Accessed June 04, 2020. https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1332.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Siddique, Talha. “Agrobiodiversity For Pest Management: An Integrated Bioeconomic Simulation and Machine Learning Approach.” 2019. Web. 04 Jun 2020.

Vancouver:

Siddique T. Agrobiodiversity For Pest Management: An Integrated Bioeconomic Simulation and Machine Learning Approach. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2019. [cited 2020 Jun 04]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1332.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Siddique T. Agrobiodiversity For Pest Management: An Integrated Bioeconomic Simulation and Machine Learning Approach. [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2019. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1332

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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