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You searched for +publisher:"University of New Hampshire" +contributor:("Charles W Walker"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Olson, Katrina K. Truncated mortalin in animal cancer.

Degree: MS, 2010, University of New Hampshire

Hematopoetic neoplasia or clam hemocyte cancer (a leukemia-like disease) has been studied in a number of bivalve molluscs for the last 20 years. Recent molecular studies of the hemocytes of the soft shell clam, Mya arenaria, have demonstrated an interaction between p53 and mortalin, the mitochondrial Hsp70. The former protein is intimately involved in the initiation of cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, and cell differentiation. In cancerous clams, wild-type p53 is sequestered in hemocyte cytoplasm by mortalin and cannot be translocated to the nucleus. This is critical because although p53 is functions properly, it is unable to enter the nucleus and initiate cell-cycle arrest. This allows the immortality of cancerous clam hemocytes (CCH). In CCH, wild-type p53 can be induced to enter the nucleus and trigger apoptosis genotoxically following treatment with the topoisomerase II inhibitor, etoposide, or non-genotoxically with the dye, MKT-077. Full-length and truncated (missing exon 3) clam variants of human mortalin have recently been cloned. Here I have generated and purified an antibody to the truncated variant of clam mortalin and have attempted to determine its location within cancerous clam hemocyte cytoplasm. I point out problems with the transfection of the truncated mortalin antibody into clam hemocyte cytoplasm and in localizing antibodies in cancerous clam hemocytes embedded in water-soluble resins. The results of this study demonstrate localization of truncated mortalin near mitochondria of cancerous clam hemocytes. Advisors/Committee Members: Charles W Walker.

Subjects/Keywords: Chemistry; Biochemistry; Biology; Molecular; Biology; Cell; Health Sciences; Oncology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Olson, K. K. (2010). Truncated mortalin in animal cancer. (Thesis). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/556

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Olson, Katrina K. “Truncated mortalin in animal cancer.” 2010. Thesis, University of New Hampshire. Accessed January 29, 2020. https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/556.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Olson, Katrina K. “Truncated mortalin in animal cancer.” 2010. Web. 29 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Olson KK. Truncated mortalin in animal cancer. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 29]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/556.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Olson KK. Truncated mortalin in animal cancer. [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2010. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/556

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Van Volkom, Kaitlin Samantha. THE EFFECTS OF INVASIVE TUNICATES ON THE GROWTH AND REPRODUCTION OF THE BLOOD STAR, HENRICIA SANGUINOLENTA.

Degree: MS, 2018, University of New Hampshire

Introduced species have become established in multiple systems around the globe where they are both predators and have been recognized as prey by native species. In the Gulf of Maine, introduced tunicates (Botrylloides violaceus, Diplosoma listeranium, and Didemnum vexillum) have become established in fouling and natural rocky benthic systems. In recent years, many native species such as Mitrella lunata and Stronglyocentrotus droebachiensis have recognized and begun to consume these introduced species. One such species is the native blood star, Henricia sanguinolenta. H. sanguinolenta, is a generalist sponge predator, but it has started to consume these invasive tunicate species as a result of declines in its native food source. Although tunicates appear to be an inferior food source when compared to native sponges, they are present in high abundances, specifically during the summer and fall periods. These studies recorded how the growth and reproduction of sea stars has been affected by these invasive tunicate species. A series of experiments was designed to examine changes in seasonal prey consumption of the blood star and effects that invasive colonial tunicates have on its growth and reproduction. Monthly monitoring of in situ blood star diet revealed they feed opportunistically on colonial tunicates. When tunicate abundance was low, they supplemented their diet with detritus, jingle shells (Anomia simplex), and barnacles (Semibalanus balanoides). It is apparent that sea stars are primarily foraging on invasive tunicate species, and they were not observed consuming their native sponge prey species. Growth and reproduction of H. sanguinolenta on invasive tunicates and native sponge (Haliclona oculata) diets were assessed through laboratory studies. Sea stars were fed one of 6 treatment diets consisting of a combination of the native sponge, H. oculata, and the invasive tunicates, B. violaceus, and D. listeranium. Their growth was monitored over several months and their final body, gonad, and pyloric caeca mass were recorded. Sea stars grew best when fed a diet of sponges, and lost weight on a diet of tunicates. Less weight was lost on a diet of D. listeranium than was on a diet of B. violaceus. In addition to measuring growth, reproduction was also assessed by weighing gonad and pyloric caecal mass. Gonadal masses across all treatments were statistically similar. However, individuals that fed on D. listeranium had higher pyloric caecal masses than those that fed on B. violaceus. These results suggest that sponges are a higher quality food source than tunicates, and that D. listeranium is a superior food source than B. violaceus. Prey choice experiments designed to test H. sanguinolenta’s preference for specific colonial tunicates or sponges was assessed through a flume study. Animals were presented with a combination of sponge and tunicate species and their movement and feeding behavior was recorded. Animals appeared to prefer H. oculata and D. listeranium over B. violaceus. However, they… Advisors/Committee Members: Larry G Harris, Jennifer A Dijkstra, Charles W Walker.

Subjects/Keywords: colonial ascidians; food webs; Henricia sanguinolenta; invasive species; native predator; Ecology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Van Volkom, K. S. (2018). THE EFFECTS OF INVASIVE TUNICATES ON THE GROWTH AND REPRODUCTION OF THE BLOOD STAR, HENRICIA SANGUINOLENTA. (Thesis). University of New Hampshire. Retrieved from https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1197

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Van Volkom, Kaitlin Samantha. “THE EFFECTS OF INVASIVE TUNICATES ON THE GROWTH AND REPRODUCTION OF THE BLOOD STAR, HENRICIA SANGUINOLENTA.” 2018. Thesis, University of New Hampshire. Accessed January 29, 2020. https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1197.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Van Volkom, Kaitlin Samantha. “THE EFFECTS OF INVASIVE TUNICATES ON THE GROWTH AND REPRODUCTION OF THE BLOOD STAR, HENRICIA SANGUINOLENTA.” 2018. Web. 29 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Van Volkom KS. THE EFFECTS OF INVASIVE TUNICATES ON THE GROWTH AND REPRODUCTION OF THE BLOOD STAR, HENRICIA SANGUINOLENTA. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 29]. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1197.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Van Volkom KS. THE EFFECTS OF INVASIVE TUNICATES ON THE GROWTH AND REPRODUCTION OF THE BLOOD STAR, HENRICIA SANGUINOLENTA. [Thesis]. University of New Hampshire; 2018. Available from: https://scholars.unh.edu/thesis/1197

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.