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You searched for +publisher:"University of New England" +contributor:("Pamela Morgan"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Simon, Matt R. East Coast Salt Marsh Response To Sea Level Rise: Microbial Community Function And Structure.

Degree: MSin Biological Sciences, Biological Science, 2013, University of New England

Coastal salt marshes are under stress from anthropogenic climate change-induced sea level rise (SLR). Sediment microbial decomposition is a major driver of marsh subsidence and any impact of SLR on this biotic process would have a direct effect on marsh surface elevation relative to sea level. Furthermore, sensitivity to SLR of microbial community composition may play a role in the functional response. I collected sediment from six coastal marshes on the United States Atlantic East coast, exposed it to simulated sea level rise and measured total respired carbon over a three week period. My results indicated that SLR caused a decrease in microbial decomposition but that this functional response varied among sites and between elevations within sites (Chapter 1 of this thesis). Although differences in decomposition rates among sites were related to organic matter content, differential functional responses to sea-level rise among sites and elevations could not be explained by organic matter, nor a suite of environmental variables that have the potential to effect microbial activity (i.e., porewater pH, salinity and redox potential). In order to determine if changes in community composition might explain the functional response that I observed, I conducted a terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rDNA extracted from sediment from the Massachusetts and New Hampshire sites (Chapter 2 of this thesis). I found that microbial community composition varied between the two sites. Furthermore, increased inundation caused a decrease in microbial community compositional shift that corresponded to a decline in decomposition rate. My results suggest that microbial functional response to SLR may be linked to changes in community composition. Advisors/Committee Members: Steven Travis, Gregory Zogg, Pamela Morgan.

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Marine Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Simon, M. R. (2013). East Coast Salt Marsh Response To Sea Level Rise: Microbial Community Function And Structure. (Thesis). University of New England. Retrieved from https://dune.une.edu/theses/47

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Simon, Matt R. “East Coast Salt Marsh Response To Sea Level Rise: Microbial Community Function And Structure.” 2013. Thesis, University of New England. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://dune.une.edu/theses/47.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Simon, Matt R. “East Coast Salt Marsh Response To Sea Level Rise: Microbial Community Function And Structure.” 2013. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Simon MR. East Coast Salt Marsh Response To Sea Level Rise: Microbial Community Function And Structure. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New England; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://dune.une.edu/theses/47.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Simon MR. East Coast Salt Marsh Response To Sea Level Rise: Microbial Community Function And Structure. [Thesis]. University of New England; 2013. Available from: https://dune.une.edu/theses/47

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Slater, Michelle A. Transport Regimes And Spread Of The Common Reed, Phramites Australis, In The Saco River, ME, USA.

Degree: MSin Marine Sciences, Marine Science, 2015, University of New England

Allee effects are important to species invasions because population growth may be limited by low outcrossing potential in newly founded populations leading to depressed levels of fitness. Non-native Phragmites australis (common reed) has been present in the United States for over 200 years, but has been slow to reach some areas, possibly owing to the Allee phenomenon, whereby young or isolated Phragmites patches with initially low genotypic richness are slow to recruit viable seedlings due to inbreeding, which limits the rate of patch expansion. In order to explore the importance of the Allee effect in a recently invaded system, the Saco River estuary of southern Maine, we characterized the genotypic richness of Phragmites patches using molecular markers to determine whether it was correlated with patch vigor. In addition, we evaluated the degree to which genotypic richness was controlled by the hydrodynamics of the estuary, which would be expected to strongly influence waterborne propagule dispersal, as well as a variety of environmental influences, particularly land development. Our models indicate that patch vigor (i.e. expansion) was not influenced by genotypic richness directly, but that the two were driven by somewhat overlapping sets of environmental variables. Stem heights were found to be positively affected by ammonium levels in marsh sediments, although we did not see a correlation with other nutrients as observed in previous studies. Our findings indicate that genotypic richness was positively influenced by specific land-cover types: the presence of nearby open fresh water, barren sand, and low-level human development. Additionally, seed viability appeared both low and random. We conclude that there is evidence for an Allee effect in the Saco River estuary, in the form of a positive relationship between genotypic richness and patch vigor in the form of stem density, in addition to low levels of seed viability in most patches. Advisors/Committee Members: Charles Tilburg, Pamela Morgan, Steven Travis.

Subjects/Keywords: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Marine Biology; Plant Biology; Plant Breeding and Genetics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Slater, M. A. (2015). Transport Regimes And Spread Of The Common Reed, Phramites Australis, In The Saco River, ME, USA. (Thesis). University of New England. Retrieved from https://dune.une.edu/theses/35

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Slater, Michelle A. “Transport Regimes And Spread Of The Common Reed, Phramites Australis, In The Saco River, ME, USA.” 2015. Thesis, University of New England. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://dune.une.edu/theses/35.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Slater, Michelle A. “Transport Regimes And Spread Of The Common Reed, Phramites Australis, In The Saco River, ME, USA.” 2015. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Slater MA. Transport Regimes And Spread Of The Common Reed, Phramites Australis, In The Saco River, ME, USA. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New England; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://dune.une.edu/theses/35.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Slater MA. Transport Regimes And Spread Of The Common Reed, Phramites Australis, In The Saco River, ME, USA. [Thesis]. University of New England; 2015. Available from: https://dune.une.edu/theses/35

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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