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You searched for +publisher:"University of New England" +contributor:("Kathryn Ono"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Wilkinson, Erin B. Consumptive And Non-Consumptive Effects Of Predatory Fishes On Lobster In Southern Maine.

Degree: MSin Marine Sciences, Marine Science, 2013, University of New England

The American lobster, Homarus americanus, is an important consumer in the Gulf of Maine benthic community and supports the most valuable fishery in New England. Many fish predators that feed on juvenile lobster are found in the Gulf of Maine, but their abundance has varied over the previous decades. For example, striped bass, Morone saxatilis, have recovered from near extinction to become a viable recreational fishery on the east coast, and previous work examining the gut contents of striped bass found that juvenile lobsters were a large component of their diet during the summer in Massachusetts. However, striped bass diet has not been examined extensively in the Gulf of Maine and this raises questions as to how important lobster may be to striped bass diet in southern Maine coastal waters. There are also many management strategies in place to help restore other fish species known to consume juvenile lobster, such as Atlantic cod, to the Gulf of Maine. It has been suggested that the abundance of lobster may be inversely related to the abundance of coastal groundfish in the Gulf of Maine. In addition to consumptive effects through feeding activity these predators may also have non-consumptive effects on their targeted prey species by causing lobster to alter their behaviors. It is unclear what consumptive and non-consumptive effects the return of these large fish predators may be having on juvenile lobster in the Gulf of Maine. Chapter 1 examines the food habits of striped bass in Southern Maine coastal waters, with an emphasis on how important lobster is to their diet. Using stomach contents and stable isotope analysis I found that for all sizes of striped bass small pelagic fish species made of the majority of diet, and for large and extra-large fish crustaceans (lobster) were found more often than in the stomachs of smaller fish. Stable isotope analysis revealed that larger striped bass expressed stronger benthic signals of δ13C, indicating that prey such as lobsters are more important to larger striped bass diet in Southern Maine than stomach contents revealed. The 2nd chapter presented here examines what sizes of juvenile lobsters are most susceptible to predation, and how juvenile lobster anti-predator response varies among different predators (striped bass, cod, and sea raven). I found that small lobsters (<45mm carapace length) are most susceptible to predation, and observed that the strength of anti-predator responses displayed by lobster varied with predator type. Lobsters reacted to the presence of Atlantic cod or sea raven by decreasing activity levels and increasing shelter use, but did not alter behavior in the presence of striped bass. This varying level of response seems consistent with differences in predator foraging modality. Taken together, the results of these two studies can be used to increase our understanding of what long term consumptive and non-consumptive effects can be expected for juvenile lobsters in southern Maine if we continue to see the… Advisors/Committee Members: Phil Yund, Jonathan Grabowski, Kathryn Ono.

Subjects/Keywords: Marine Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wilkinson, E. B. (2013). Consumptive And Non-Consumptive Effects Of Predatory Fishes On Lobster In Southern Maine. (Thesis). University of New England. Retrieved from https://dune.une.edu/theses/105

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilkinson, Erin B. “Consumptive And Non-Consumptive Effects Of Predatory Fishes On Lobster In Southern Maine.” 2013. Thesis, University of New England. Accessed December 09, 2019. https://dune.une.edu/theses/105.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilkinson, Erin B. “Consumptive And Non-Consumptive Effects Of Predatory Fishes On Lobster In Southern Maine.” 2013. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Wilkinson EB. Consumptive And Non-Consumptive Effects Of Predatory Fishes On Lobster In Southern Maine. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New England; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: https://dune.une.edu/theses/105.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wilkinson EB. Consumptive And Non-Consumptive Effects Of Predatory Fishes On Lobster In Southern Maine. [Thesis]. University of New England; 2013. Available from: https://dune.une.edu/theses/105

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Harris, Jennifer. Two- And Three-Dimensional Photogrammetric Mass Estimation Techniques For Two Phocid Species: Halichoerus Grypus And Phoca Vitulina Concolor.

Degree: MSin Marine Sciences, Marine Science, 2012, University of New England

Collecting mass measurements of seals is a common technique used to determine health. To determine the mass of Western North Atlantic Grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) and Atlantic Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina concolor) pups, a researcher must physically measure each animal. This produces stress for both pups and their mothers. Photogrammetric analysis (PGA) (evaluating photographs to obtain characteristics of a subject) has been used to determine physical measurements in a number of marine mammals. The purpose of this study was to develop a nonintrusive method for determining the mass of grey and harbor seal pups. Through this study we developed two- and three-dimensional PGA multiple regression models for predicting body mass of weanlings of both species. Photographs of grey seal pups were taken in the field and harbor seal photographs were taken in a captive setting. Calibration parameters were determined in Matlab and Olympus software, using an object of known measurement as a scale. Three-dimensional stereo-PGA was the most accurate close-range mass estimation technique. The most accurate grey seal model demonstrated significant agreement (p=0.006, r2=0.913) between predictions and the true population mean at a 95% CI. The harbor seal model with the highest accuracy demonstrated significant agreement as well (p= r2=0.904). Two-dimensional grey and harbor seal PGA models functioned best when used for distance PGA, predicting mass within 4% - 20% accuracy, at distances up to 22 meters. PGA models were validated through results of models created from physical measurements. For instance, a high correlation, Adjusted r2=0.885, was seen in harbor seal physical models, however a strong correlation, Adjusted r2=0.807, was seen in harbor seal PGA models as well. Models built in this study will be useful in future field and captive setting work with both species. Using these models for distance PGA purposes will also limit mother-pup disturbance. Advisors/Committee Members: Kathryn Ono, Bruce Maxwell, Geoff Ganter.

Subjects/Keywords: non-intrusive mass determination; photogrammetric analysis; PGA model; seal; marine mammals; Marine Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harris, J. (2012). Two- And Three-Dimensional Photogrammetric Mass Estimation Techniques For Two Phocid Species: Halichoerus Grypus And Phoca Vitulina Concolor. (Thesis). University of New England. Retrieved from https://dune.une.edu/theses/12

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harris, Jennifer. “Two- And Three-Dimensional Photogrammetric Mass Estimation Techniques For Two Phocid Species: Halichoerus Grypus And Phoca Vitulina Concolor.” 2012. Thesis, University of New England. Accessed December 09, 2019. https://dune.une.edu/theses/12.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harris, Jennifer. “Two- And Three-Dimensional Photogrammetric Mass Estimation Techniques For Two Phocid Species: Halichoerus Grypus And Phoca Vitulina Concolor.” 2012. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Harris J. Two- And Three-Dimensional Photogrammetric Mass Estimation Techniques For Two Phocid Species: Halichoerus Grypus And Phoca Vitulina Concolor. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New England; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: https://dune.une.edu/theses/12.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harris J. Two- And Three-Dimensional Photogrammetric Mass Estimation Techniques For Two Phocid Species: Halichoerus Grypus And Phoca Vitulina Concolor. [Thesis]. University of New England; 2012. Available from: https://dune.une.edu/theses/12

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Sirak, Laura N. Grey (Halichoerus Grypus) And Harbor Seal (Phoca Vitulina) Bycatch And Depredation In New England Sink-Gillnet Fisheries.

Degree: MSin Marine Sciences, Marine Science, 2015, University of New England

Marine mammals interact with commercial fisheries via competition for resources, depredation (feeding on fish caught in gear), entanglement, and bycatch in fishing gear. In New England, gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) and harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) are often taken as bycatch in sink-gillnet fisheries and are believed to depredate fish in gillnets. As seal populations increase, interactions with fisheries are also likely to increase, affecting both seal stocks and the New England fishing industry. This study aims to understand seal bycatch in the New England sink-gillnet fisheries by identifying the spatial and temporal trends in bycatch as well as the characteristics of seals that are taken most frequently as bycatch. Depredation is also a concern in the commercial fishing industry, however, there is some controversy among fishermen and scientists concerning the identification of the species responsible for depredation (e.g. seal vs. spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias)). Therefore, a protocol for identifying seal and spiny dogfish depredation was developed and used to identify depredation in a small-scale study of the sink-gillnet fishery targeting skate. Data from the Northeast Fisheries Observer Program (NEFOP) from 2005 – 2013 were analyzed to assess seal bycatch in the Northeast sink-gillnet fishery. Male seals were taken significantly more frequently than females, with young of the year most commonly occurring as bycatch. Areas where seals were taken in New England shifted seasonally, generally following the annual life history of each seal species. Gray seal bycatch showed an increasing trend over the years of study, with highest bycatch occurring in the spring in areas closest to haul out sites: Muskeget and Monomoy Island, MA, USA. Harbor seal bycatch was much more variable between years, with highest bycatch occurring in the winter near major harbor seals haul out sites along the southern Maine coast and southeastern Massachusetts. This study was a crucial step to understanding the complexities of seal-fishery interactions in New England. In order to mitigate damage from depredation, it is important to know the source of the damage. Characteristics of seal and spiny dogfish bites were identified using foam imprints from jaws and bites by captive animals in the soft tissue of fish. Measurements from bite imprints and damaged fish were used to develop a protocol for identifying damage in the field. In general, dogfish bites were clean (flesh completely removed), circular in shape, and wider than long (bite ratio (bite length/bite width) < 0.6), whereas seal bites were ragged (flesh not completely removed, but partially torn from the bite), rectangular or trapezoidal in shape, and usually longer than wide or equal in length and width (bite ratio > 0.7). This protocol was used to identify damaged catch observed on a commercial gill-net fishing vessel targeting skate in New England waters June – August 2014. In this small-scale study, dogfish bites were identified as… Advisors/Committee Members: Kathryn Ono, Carrie Byron, Steven Travis.

Subjects/Keywords: Aquaculture and Fisheries; Marine Biology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sirak, L. N. (2015). Grey (Halichoerus Grypus) And Harbor Seal (Phoca Vitulina) Bycatch And Depredation In New England Sink-Gillnet Fisheries. (Thesis). University of New England. Retrieved from https://dune.une.edu/theses/120

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sirak, Laura N. “Grey (Halichoerus Grypus) And Harbor Seal (Phoca Vitulina) Bycatch And Depredation In New England Sink-Gillnet Fisheries.” 2015. Thesis, University of New England. Accessed December 09, 2019. https://dune.une.edu/theses/120.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sirak, Laura N. “Grey (Halichoerus Grypus) And Harbor Seal (Phoca Vitulina) Bycatch And Depredation In New England Sink-Gillnet Fisheries.” 2015. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Sirak LN. Grey (Halichoerus Grypus) And Harbor Seal (Phoca Vitulina) Bycatch And Depredation In New England Sink-Gillnet Fisheries. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New England; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: https://dune.une.edu/theses/120.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sirak LN. Grey (Halichoerus Grypus) And Harbor Seal (Phoca Vitulina) Bycatch And Depredation In New England Sink-Gillnet Fisheries. [Thesis]. University of New England; 2015. Available from: https://dune.une.edu/theses/120

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.