Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Nevada – Reno" +contributor:("Yerka, Melinda"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Eustis, Ashley. Evaluation of ten genotypes for leaf physiological performance under a simulated heat wave.

Degree: 2019, University of Nevada – Reno

Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) sensitivity to high temperatures is an impediment to adoption in regions prone to heat waves, despite quinoa being a highly resilient crop to a wide range of abiotic stresses. Although reductions in yield due to heat are usually associated with pollen viability, the present study aimed to understand the effects of high temperature on the leaf and its capacity for carbon assimilation. Several trials were conducted with 10 quinoa genotypes classified as being either sensitive or tolerant to heat stress on a previous screening of 112 lines. Plants were grown in the greenhouse at normal temperatures (i.e., control), and at the sixth growth stage were exposed to temperature treatments in growth chambers. The heat treatment simulated heat waves of four consecutive days with temperatures higher during the day and night (Heat: 45/30 ˚C, and Control: 20/14 ˚C). Chlorophyll fluorescence (predawn and day), leaf gas exchange (day) and dark respiration (night) were measured during several experiments. In addition, leaf cell membrane stability was evaluated in the laboratory at temperatures of 47, 51 and 55 ˚C. Results show that most quinoa genotypes under the heat treatment increased their photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance, resulting in a lower intrinsic water use efficiency. These results were partly corroborated by changes in the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). Dark respiration decreased under the heat treatment in most genotypes. The cell membrane stability assays showed that temperatures of 51 ˚C or higher increased the percent injury to >70%, and a temperature of 47 ˚C may be a better screening temperature as injury was around 35%. These results suggest that heat stress does not affect carbon assimilation capacity, but higher transpiration and lower intrinsic water use efficiency may lead to water deficits and exacerbate plant stress responses, resulting in lower yields. Advisors/Committee Members: Barrios-Masias, Felipe H. (advisor), Yerka, Melinda (committee member), Miller, Glenn (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: heat; heat stress; heat tolerance; quinoa

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Eustis, A. (2019). Evaluation of ten genotypes for leaf physiological performance under a simulated heat wave. (Thesis). University of Nevada – Reno. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11714/6030

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eustis, Ashley. “Evaluation of ten genotypes for leaf physiological performance under a simulated heat wave.” 2019. Thesis, University of Nevada – Reno. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11714/6030.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eustis, Ashley. “Evaluation of ten genotypes for leaf physiological performance under a simulated heat wave.” 2019. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Eustis A. Evaluation of ten genotypes for leaf physiological performance under a simulated heat wave. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Nevada – Reno; 2019. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11714/6030.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Eustis A. Evaluation of ten genotypes for leaf physiological performance under a simulated heat wave. [Thesis]. University of Nevada – Reno; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11714/6030

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Trowbridge, Julia. Toward Understanding the Genetic Basis of Cross-Incompatibility in Sorghum: de novo genome Assembly of Johnsongrass and Resequencing of Iap and BAM1 loci.

Degree: 2019, University of Nevada – Reno

Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] (referred to as “sorghum” hereafter) is a C4 grain crop in the grass family Poaceae. It is closely-related to other members of subfamily Panicoideae, including the staple crops maize [Zea mays L.] and rice [Oryza sativa L.], and is the 5th-most produced cereal crop in the world.31,33,72 The U.S. leads production of sorghum globally.34 Johnsongrass is the weedy species of sorghum, considered a noxious weed in 46 states in the United States and often found growing within close proximity to sorghum where it has been shown to contaminate harvest seed through gene flow. The risk of gene flow is the primary reason why GE sorghum has not been approved for commercialization by USDA-APHIS (personal communication, Dr. Subray Hegde, USDA Biotechnology Regulatory Services branch chief in the Biotechnology Risk Analysis Program). Many efforts71,73-77 have been made to determine the rate of gene flow between sorghum and Johnsongrass to empirically assess the risk of sorghum traits transferring to feral Johnsongrass populations, but these studies have used limited numbers of accessions from both species and the lack of high-throughput genotyping methods or a high-quality Johnsongrass reference genome have led to inconsistent results. Given the polyploid history of Johnsongrass (a putative allotetraploid [2n = 4x = 40] and the close relationship between ancestral genomes, this risk is not insignificant. In order to determine the frequency of sorghum alleles segregating in feral Johnsongrass populations, an assembled and annotated Johnsongrass reference genome is needed to identify species-specific alleles, and their copy number, that may differ from ii those in the existing, well-annotated sorghum reference genome. Availability of a Johnsongrass reference genome would enable researchers around the world to directly quantify stably introgressed sorghum alleles segregating in local Johnsongrass populations of interest. Local rates of gene flow are needed because different sorghum genotypes and production methods are used in different geographies, and both factors could impact rates of reproductive success, genetic drift, or the fixation of crop alleles. This thesis provides the basic genomic framework necessary to assist in NGSbased inquiries into the ancestry, speciation, and comparative genomics of Johnsongrass and sorghum. We completed the first Johnsongrass de novo genome assembly and amplified, through long-read resequencing, the putative reproductive barrier loci (Inhibition of Alien Pollen, Iap and Barely Any Meristem, BAM164) in Johnsongrass that are known to impact rates of gene flow among Sorghum species and closely-related genera (Zea and Saccharum). This new Johnsongrass reference genome and targeted competed resequencing data will greatly facilitate population genetic studies aimed to clarify empirical rates of gene flow among sorghum and Johnsongrass specifically, and within the Sorghum species complex generally. They will additionally assist with genetic and physiological… Advisors/Committee Members: Yerka, Melinda (advisor), Barrios-Masias, Felipe (committee member), Alvarez-Ponce, David (committee member), Harper, Jeff (committee member).

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Trowbridge, J. (2019). Toward Understanding the Genetic Basis of Cross-Incompatibility in Sorghum: de novo genome Assembly of Johnsongrass and Resequencing of Iap and BAM1 loci. (Thesis). University of Nevada – Reno. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11714/6685

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Trowbridge, Julia. “Toward Understanding the Genetic Basis of Cross-Incompatibility in Sorghum: de novo genome Assembly of Johnsongrass and Resequencing of Iap and BAM1 loci.” 2019. Thesis, University of Nevada – Reno. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11714/6685.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Trowbridge, Julia. “Toward Understanding the Genetic Basis of Cross-Incompatibility in Sorghum: de novo genome Assembly of Johnsongrass and Resequencing of Iap and BAM1 loci.” 2019. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Trowbridge J. Toward Understanding the Genetic Basis of Cross-Incompatibility in Sorghum: de novo genome Assembly of Johnsongrass and Resequencing of Iap and BAM1 loci. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Nevada – Reno; 2019. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11714/6685.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Trowbridge J. Toward Understanding the Genetic Basis of Cross-Incompatibility in Sorghum: de novo genome Assembly of Johnsongrass and Resequencing of Iap and BAM1 loci. [Thesis]. University of Nevada – Reno; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11714/6685

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.