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You searched for +publisher:"University of Nevada – Reno" +contributor:("Chandler, Dana"). One record found.

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1. Page, Reba A. "Wringing Their Bread from the Sweat of Other Men's Faces" The Persistent Use of Forced Labor in the Postbellum South.

Degree: 2017, University of Nevada – Reno

For many, “involuntary servitude” is intellectually understood as unconstitutional; it is viewed as a vague legal concept that is difficult to define. For its prey, “involuntary servitude” is a harmful and damaging reality in which they are forced to work for another and prevented from leaving. For black refugees of the great 1927 Mississippi River flood in Greenville, Mississippi, it seemed a nightmare return to slave-like conditions that were forbidden by law if not custom after the Civil War. This dissertation examines the events that took place, and key people who affected them, against the backdrop of three centuries of American law that facilitated or forbade the use of coerced labor, particularly against those of African American descent. Specific legal topics and relevant caselaw assessed include the development of slavery in colonial and post- revolutionary America; coerced labor and emerging civil rights as consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction; the use of racially-motivated violence to subvert freedmen’s rights; and President Theodore Roosevelt’s peonage investigation, which led to landmark decisions and new views on debt enslavement and misused convict labor as surrogates for chattel slavery. The dissertation builds on this historic legal framework to explore the question of whether Greenville’s black refugees were illegally victimized or simply mistreated within harsh but acceptable social norms.1. Introduction to the FloodThe devastation wrought by the 1927 Mississippi River flood remains almost beyond imagination. While official tallies are suspect, at least 245 people drowned, and a land mass exceeding 26,000 square miles spread over seven states was inundated by waters up to 80 miles wide; a map of the affected area is provided in figure (2). This was a cataclysmic natural event with geopolitical consequences that are little acknowledged, yet are still experienced today. Repercussions spurred an increasing number of African Americans to move from the South, and undermined the power of the Republican Party. The overwhelming task of meeting the needs of those affected by this overwhelming natural catastrophe helped change official disaster policy from a primary reliance upon charitable organizations, to greater federal funding and support for relief and recovery. The human toll of the floodwaters was compounded by racialized abuses in segregated refugee camps that were established by the American Red Cross (ARC). Black victims’ pleas for help went unmet until “leaks” to the northern “Negro press” ignited public outcry. When this scandal threatened to derail U.S. Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover’s presidential aspirations and diminish desperately needed donations, the ARC convened a “Colored Advisory Commission” (CAC) comprised of representatives from Tuskegee Institute and other leading African Americans to investigate the charges. CAC member Thomas Monroe Campbell (1883-1956) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the son of slaves, handled particularly… Advisors/Committee Members: Richardson, James T. (advisor), de Jong, Greta (committee member), Chen, James M. (committee member), Cuillier, David (committee member), Chandler, Dana (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: constitutional law; peonage

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APA (6th Edition):

Page, R. A. (2017). "Wringing Their Bread from the Sweat of Other Men's Faces" The Persistent Use of Forced Labor in the Postbellum South. (Thesis). University of Nevada – Reno. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11714/1970

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Page, Reba A. “"Wringing Their Bread from the Sweat of Other Men's Faces" The Persistent Use of Forced Labor in the Postbellum South.” 2017. Thesis, University of Nevada – Reno. Accessed February 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11714/1970.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Page, Reba A. “"Wringing Their Bread from the Sweat of Other Men's Faces" The Persistent Use of Forced Labor in the Postbellum South.” 2017. Web. 26 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Page RA. "Wringing Their Bread from the Sweat of Other Men's Faces" The Persistent Use of Forced Labor in the Postbellum South. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Nevada – Reno; 2017. [cited 2021 Feb 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11714/1970.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Page RA. "Wringing Their Bread from the Sweat of Other Men's Faces" The Persistent Use of Forced Labor in the Postbellum South. [Thesis]. University of Nevada – Reno; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11714/1970

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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