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You searched for +publisher:"University of Nevada – Reno" +contributor:("Barrios-Masias, Felipe H."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Bristow, Steven Tyler. Utilization of tomato rootstock as a strategy to increase crop performance under suboptimal soil temperatures.

Degree: 2020, University of Nevada – Reno

Suboptimal soil temperatures (SST) reduce root establishment, growth, nutrient and water uptake thus impeding shoot growth and delaying harvests. Growers in northern latitudes and higher elevations such as in northern Nevada can encounter adequate air temperatures during the day but production can still be challenged by SST (≤20 °C) for summer crops. To adapt and optimize warm-vegetable production early in the season, growers may be able to rely on improved performance by using chilling-tolerant rootstocks. However, information on which rootstocks and how they can improve performance does not exist. We evaluated four commercial tomato rootstocks (Estamino, Maxifort, RST-04-106T and Supernatural) grafted with a common scion and the non-grafted scion/cultivar (BHN-589) under prolonged chilling stress. Several root and shoot physiological traits were evaluated regarding plant performance, water and nutrient uptake. Exposure to SST reduced plant water uptake as indicated by reduced root hydraulic conductivity (Lp) and conductance, stomatal conductance (gs¬¬), and plant biomass. Reduced Lp was partially explained by increased cortex area of primary roots under SST. While all grafted phenotypes demonstrated higher gs than the non-grafted cultivar under optimal soil temperatures, only two grafted phenotypes maintained higher gs under SST. All phenotypes showed greater reductions in shoot biomass than root biomass resulting in increased root-to-shoot ratios. In the hoop houses, most grafted phenotypes increased early canopy cover, NDVI, shoot biomass, and fruit yield. We demonstrate that some commercial rootstocks possess traits that can improve plant functions and contribute towards earlier plant establishment and improved performance under the SST conditions present in northern Nevada. Advisors/Committee Members: Barrios-Masias, Felipe H. (advisor), Verburg, Paul (committee member), Kosma, Dylan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: grafting; mineral nutrition; root anatomy; root hydraulic conductivity; Solanum lycopersicum; stomatal conductance

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APA (6th Edition):

Bristow, S. T. (2020). Utilization of tomato rootstock as a strategy to increase crop performance under suboptimal soil temperatures. (Thesis). University of Nevada – Reno. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11714/7692

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bristow, Steven Tyler. “Utilization of tomato rootstock as a strategy to increase crop performance under suboptimal soil temperatures.” 2020. Thesis, University of Nevada – Reno. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11714/7692.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bristow, Steven Tyler. “Utilization of tomato rootstock as a strategy to increase crop performance under suboptimal soil temperatures.” 2020. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Bristow ST. Utilization of tomato rootstock as a strategy to increase crop performance under suboptimal soil temperatures. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Nevada – Reno; 2020. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11714/7692.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bristow ST. Utilization of tomato rootstock as a strategy to increase crop performance under suboptimal soil temperatures. [Thesis]. University of Nevada – Reno; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11714/7692

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Eustis, Ashley. Evaluation of ten genotypes for leaf physiological performance under a simulated heat wave.

Degree: 2019, University of Nevada – Reno

Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) sensitivity to high temperatures is an impediment to adoption in regions prone to heat waves, despite quinoa being a highly resilient crop to a wide range of abiotic stresses. Although reductions in yield due to heat are usually associated with pollen viability, the present study aimed to understand the effects of high temperature on the leaf and its capacity for carbon assimilation. Several trials were conducted with 10 quinoa genotypes classified as being either sensitive or tolerant to heat stress on a previous screening of 112 lines. Plants were grown in the greenhouse at normal temperatures (i.e., control), and at the sixth growth stage were exposed to temperature treatments in growth chambers. The heat treatment simulated heat waves of four consecutive days with temperatures higher during the day and night (Heat: 45/30 ˚C, and Control: 20/14 ˚C). Chlorophyll fluorescence (predawn and day), leaf gas exchange (day) and dark respiration (night) were measured during several experiments. In addition, leaf cell membrane stability was evaluated in the laboratory at temperatures of 47, 51 and 55 ˚C. Results show that most quinoa genotypes under the heat treatment increased their photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance, resulting in a lower intrinsic water use efficiency. These results were partly corroborated by changes in the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). Dark respiration decreased under the heat treatment in most genotypes. The cell membrane stability assays showed that temperatures of 51 ˚C or higher increased the percent injury to >70%, and a temperature of 47 ˚C may be a better screening temperature as injury was around 35%. These results suggest that heat stress does not affect carbon assimilation capacity, but higher transpiration and lower intrinsic water use efficiency may lead to water deficits and exacerbate plant stress responses, resulting in lower yields. Advisors/Committee Members: Barrios-Masias, Felipe H. (advisor), Yerka, Melinda (committee member), Miller, Glenn (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: heat; heat stress; heat tolerance; quinoa

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Eustis, A. (2019). Evaluation of ten genotypes for leaf physiological performance under a simulated heat wave. (Thesis). University of Nevada – Reno. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11714/6030

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eustis, Ashley. “Evaluation of ten genotypes for leaf physiological performance under a simulated heat wave.” 2019. Thesis, University of Nevada – Reno. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11714/6030.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eustis, Ashley. “Evaluation of ten genotypes for leaf physiological performance under a simulated heat wave.” 2019. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Eustis A. Evaluation of ten genotypes for leaf physiological performance under a simulated heat wave. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Nevada – Reno; 2019. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11714/6030.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Eustis A. Evaluation of ten genotypes for leaf physiological performance under a simulated heat wave. [Thesis]. University of Nevada – Reno; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11714/6030

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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