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You searched for +publisher:"University of Nevada – Las Vegas" +contributor:("Steven deBelle"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Nevada – Las Vegas

1. Constantino, Benjamin. The Larval salivary gland of Drosophila melangogaster: A model system for temporal and spatial steroid hormone regulation.

Degree: PhD, Life Sciences, 2010, University of Nevada – Las Vegas

Drosophila melanogaster provides an ideal model organism to test genetic and molecular biological mechanisms within the context of a living animal. For over one hundred years Drosophila continues to produce a boundless extent of informative and important scientific data providing crucial insight into development, disease progression and genetic interactions. A century as a model organism allowed for the development of an abundance of unique genetic and molecular tools allowing researchers to tease apart cellular mechanisms with very little limitation. From the whole adult body to tissue function to molecular networks, if a biological question arises it most likely can be answered using the fruit fly. The Drosophila larval salivary gland is an organ that not only takes advantage of the many biological tools available, but also has innate properties favoring it as a model tissue to investigate nuclear hormone activity. In the final larval stage (third instar) of Drosophila, the salivary gland responds to the steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) by synthesizing and secreting a glycosylated polypeptide glue mix (glue). In the mid-third instar, a low titer of 20E initiates a complex of gene expression that targets the glue genes resulting in the synthesis of glue. Using fluorescent markers tagged to the glue, this event is easily monitored using confocal microscopy. The first part of my dissertation describes a model in which glue synthesis is a 20E-coordinated event and that surprisingly did not act through a canonical nuclear hormone receptor. Prior to my research, it was known that 20E-activated genes act through a nuclear hormone receptor comprised of a heterodimer between two proteins, ecdysone receptor (EcR) and ultraspirical (USP). However, I show that 20E-regulated glue synthesis is USP independent. Included in this section of my dissertation are experiments designed to test this model of glue synthesis that is independent of USP and to investigate the potential for another co-receptor functioning with EcR to initiate glue synthesis. Following the logic that another receptor is functioning with EcR in 20E-mediated glue synthesis, I investigated other candidate receptors. I found the nuclear receptor, DHR96, to be required for glue synthesis and performed experiments that suggest DHR96 may work with EcR to initiate glue synthesis in response to a 20E signal. The remaining sections of my dissertation are focused on the latter half of the third instar. This stage of the larval life cycle is the late-third instar and is marked in the salivary gland by the secretion of mature glue granules into the lumen of the gland in response to a large pre-metamorphic pulse of 20E. During this period, 20E initiates the expression of proteins that are mostly transcription factors; however, a gene was identified that had sequence similarity to both calmodulin and myosin light chains. This gene, E63-1, has been shown to trigger precocious glue secretion in glands overexpressing E63-1. However, E63-1… Advisors/Committee Members: Andrew J. Andres, Chair, Frank van Breukelen, Allen Gibbs, Steven deBelle.

Subjects/Keywords: Genetics; Molecular Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Constantino, B. (2010). The Larval salivary gland of Drosophila melangogaster: A model system for temporal and spatial steroid hormone regulation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Nevada – Las Vegas. Retrieved from https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/833

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Constantino, Benjamin. “The Larval salivary gland of Drosophila melangogaster: A model system for temporal and spatial steroid hormone regulation.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Nevada – Las Vegas. Accessed July 10, 2020. https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/833.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Constantino, Benjamin. “The Larval salivary gland of Drosophila melangogaster: A model system for temporal and spatial steroid hormone regulation.” 2010. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Constantino B. The Larval salivary gland of Drosophila melangogaster: A model system for temporal and spatial steroid hormone regulation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Nevada – Las Vegas; 2010. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/833.

Council of Science Editors:

Constantino B. The Larval salivary gland of Drosophila melangogaster: A model system for temporal and spatial steroid hormone regulation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Nevada – Las Vegas; 2010. Available from: https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/833


University of Nevada – Las Vegas

2. Boyles, Randy S. Presenilin is necessary for the function of CBP in the adult Drosophila CNS.

Degree: PhD, Life Sciences, 2010, University of Nevada – Las Vegas

Dominant mutations in Presenilin (Psn) have been correlated with the formation of Aß- containing plaques in patients with inherited forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, a clear mechanism directly linking amyloid plaques to the pathology of familial or sporadic forms of AD has remained elusive. Thus, recent discoveries of several new substrates for Psn protease activity have sparked alternative hypotheses to explain the preclinical symptoms of AD. CBP (CREB-binding protein) is a haplo- insufficient transcriptional co-activator with histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity that has been proposed to be a downstream target for Psn signaling. Individuals with reduced CBP levels have cognitive deficits that have been linked to several neurological disorders. However, there are contradictory reports in the vertebrate literature regarding the relationship between Psn activity and CBP levels. This dissertation using Drosophila melanogaster, provides evidence for the first time that Psn is required for normal CBP levels and for maintaining global acetylations of the central nervous system of the adult fly. This work also demonstrates that adult flies conditionally compromised for CBP display an altered geotaxis response to gravity that likely reflects a neurological defect. The association between Psn and CBP is most likely not direct, but through a signaling molecule released via Psn-mediated substrate processing. One possible candidate for this intermediate molecule is the transmembrane receptor Notch. Notch is attractive because it has been shown previously to be required for long-term memory, and I have provided evidence here that suggests Notch is required for neurite outgrowth through the culturing of primary neurons of the mushroom body (a region known to be important for learning and memory in flies). In addition I have located putative DNA binding sites for the Notch transcription factor Su(H) in the CBP enhancer, which suggests a regulatory role for Notch in CBP transcription. Although this is an attractive model, my data do not support it. Therefore it is likely that Notch and Psn/CBP control functions of the adult CNS through independent signaling molecules or pathways. If the model proves correct for vertebrates, it will have a significant impact on the development of new therapies and pharmaceuticals agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Advisors/Committee Members: Andrew J. Andres, Chair, Steven deBelle, Frank van Breukelen, Allen Gibbs.

Subjects/Keywords: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience; Neuroscience and Neurobiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Boyles, R. S. (2010). Presenilin is necessary for the function of CBP in the adult Drosophila CNS. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Nevada – Las Vegas. Retrieved from https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/886

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boyles, Randy S. “Presenilin is necessary for the function of CBP in the adult Drosophila CNS.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Nevada – Las Vegas. Accessed July 10, 2020. https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/886.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boyles, Randy S. “Presenilin is necessary for the function of CBP in the adult Drosophila CNS.” 2010. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Boyles RS. Presenilin is necessary for the function of CBP in the adult Drosophila CNS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Nevada – Las Vegas; 2010. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/886.

Council of Science Editors:

Boyles RS. Presenilin is necessary for the function of CBP in the adult Drosophila CNS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Nevada – Las Vegas; 2010. Available from: https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/886

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