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You searched for +publisher:"University of Nevada – Las Vegas" +contributor:("Maria Raquel Casas"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Nevada – Las Vegas

1. Peardon, Aaron. Jackpot! A legal history of Indian gaming in California.

Degree: MAin History, History, 2011, University of Nevada – Las Vegas

Indian Gaming has transformed the economic, political, and sociological landscape of California. The growth of Indian casinos has had a profound impact on both Indian and non-Indian communities alike. California tribes took the lead in legalizing Indian Gaming throughout the nation. The efforts of California tribes in the legislative and political process have enabled many tribal groups to rise out of poverty and to gain prosperity that would otherwise be impossible to achieve. They have also brought increased revenue to local communities and have provided thousands of jobs to all Californians. This thesis discusses the historical relationships between Native American groups and the various government entities with which they have interacted. Starting with a general overview of the legal history of major legislative and judicial decisions affecting all aspects of tribal-government relations, the topics narrow to a discussion of the direct impact of court decisions both major and minor on Indian Gaming throughout the United States. These decisions led to congressional action including the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act which provided the foundation for legalized Indian Gaming. California Tribes were at the forefront of these decisions, and as the legal playing field continued to change, native groups adapted by taking their cause to the citizens of their state. The thesis provides a detailed explanation of the compacting process, a discussion of tribal struggles through the use of the direct initiative, and an illustration of how this battle led to unforeseen benefits for tribal enterprises. The thesis concludes in the year 2009 with a discussion of the current status of Indian Gaming in California and future concerns that face native governments in their ongoing effort towards greater tribal sovereignty. Advisors/Committee Members: Maria Raquel Casas, Chair, David Tanenhaus, William Bauer.

Subjects/Keywords: American Studies; Cultural History; Gaming and Casino Operations Management; Indian and Aboriginal Law; Indigenous Studies; Sociology; United States History

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APA (6th Edition):

Peardon, A. (2011). Jackpot! A legal history of Indian gaming in California. (Masters Thesis). University of Nevada – Las Vegas. Retrieved from https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/905

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Peardon, Aaron. “Jackpot! A legal history of Indian gaming in California.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Nevada – Las Vegas. Accessed September 22, 2019. https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/905.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Peardon, Aaron. “Jackpot! A legal history of Indian gaming in California.” 2011. Web. 22 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Peardon A. Jackpot! A legal history of Indian gaming in California. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Nevada – Las Vegas; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 22]. Available from: https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/905.

Council of Science Editors:

Peardon A. Jackpot! A legal history of Indian gaming in California. [Masters Thesis]. University of Nevada – Las Vegas; 2011. Available from: https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/905


University of Nevada – Las Vegas

2. Evans, Stefani Jan. From khaki to brown: Community formation, homeownership, and mobility in Santa Ana, California, 1950-2000.

Degree: MAin History, History, 2011, University of Nevada – Las Vegas

This thesis examines the first fifty years of a modest 1950 housing tract of one hundred thirty-nine houses and five commercial lots in Santa Ana, California. I analyzed deeds, maps, newspapers, powers of attorney, building permits, city directories, and promotional material and interviewed nearly one hundred former and current residents to determine who came to Santa Ana in the mid-twentieth century, why they came, and why they stayed or left. Contrary to what contemporary Los Angeles boosters might have thought, mid-century Santa Ana was not simply a suburb of Los Angeles. In 1950 Santa Ana, with 45,533 residents and forty manufactories, was the urban hub for El Toro Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) and for growing Orange County. By the end of the century the city’s housing units were the most densely populated in the U.S. My research suggests that between 1950 and 2000 most new residents, including the hundreds of thousands of Marines who transferred to and through El Toro MCAS, followed their jobs to Santa Ana; others came in search of cultural community. My analysis of deeds and interviews indicates that high numbers of active-duty military homeowners altered the community landscape by stimulating frequent housing turnover and a high number of absentee-landlord rental properties that continued through the end of the century. Historians Becky Nicolaides, Andrew Wiese, Greg Hise, and others who reexamine Kenneth Jackson’s 1985 Crabgrass Frontier identify alternate forms of postwar suburbs that differ from the Levittown model of popular imagery. The Santa Ana tract in this study represents one such variation that was integrated into the city through mixed land use and public through-traffic. In The Suburb Reader (2006) editors Nicolaides and Wiese call for historians to investigate the extent to which the postwar suburban nuclear family accurately reflected the ideal image. Although the Santa Ana developer originally sold houses only to white married couples, most families in this tract did not fit the traditional nuclear family model in several ways. Notably, the tract’s military families with often-absent husbands and fathers deviated significantly from the traditional ideal. However, death, marriage, divorce, migration, and economics affected nuclear family structure and homeownership for most families within the small tract from 1950, before the new houses closed escrow, through 2000, by which time the demographic and built profiles of the tract and the city had changed. Advisors/Committee Members: Greg Hise, Chair, Todd Robinson, Maria Raquel Casas.

Subjects/Keywords: Cultural History; History; Social History; United States History

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APA (6th Edition):

Evans, S. J. (2011). From khaki to brown: Community formation, homeownership, and mobility in Santa Ana, California, 1950-2000. (Masters Thesis). University of Nevada – Las Vegas. Retrieved from https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/1009

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Evans, Stefani Jan. “From khaki to brown: Community formation, homeownership, and mobility in Santa Ana, California, 1950-2000.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Nevada – Las Vegas. Accessed September 22, 2019. https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/1009.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Evans, Stefani Jan. “From khaki to brown: Community formation, homeownership, and mobility in Santa Ana, California, 1950-2000.” 2011. Web. 22 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Evans SJ. From khaki to brown: Community formation, homeownership, and mobility in Santa Ana, California, 1950-2000. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Nevada – Las Vegas; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 22]. Available from: https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/1009.

Council of Science Editors:

Evans SJ. From khaki to brown: Community formation, homeownership, and mobility in Santa Ana, California, 1950-2000. [Masters Thesis]. University of Nevada – Las Vegas; 2011. Available from: https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/1009


University of Nevada – Las Vegas

3. Christensen, David. “The Ground You Walk on Belongs to My People": Lakota Community Building, Activism, and Red Power in Western Nebraska, 1917-2000.

Degree: PhD, History, 2016, University of Nevada – Las Vegas

Framed by histories of Lakotas in the twentieth century, American Indian Activism, and the “long civil rights movement,” this dissertation seeks to provide new perspectives on the American Indian civil rights movement. Although the United States government removed Lakotas from western Nebraska in the late nineteenth century, some returned to a portion of their homeland, settling and working in the border town of Gordon and the region’s two largest towns, Alliance and Scottsbluff, in the twentieth century. Between 1917 and 2000, Lakotas living in off reservation communities in western Nebraska created a grassroots reform movement, whose goals differed from the national and pan-Indian civil rights movement. Although many were enrolled tribal members of the Oglala or Sičháŋğu Lakota Nations, Lakotas in western Nebraska were more concerned with ending segregation and racism in their communities than explicitly addressing tribal sovereignty. Lakota leaders not only fought to end discrimination, but also for the federal government to continue providing its trust responsibilities to Lakotas in western Nebraska. This dissertation reveals that American Indian civil rights’ origins are more diverse than being rooted in national American Indian organizations. The movement that arose in western Nebraska provides an example of American Indian activism that developed in a rural off reservation region. Advisors/Committee Members: William Bauer, Andrew Kirk, P. Jane Hafen, Maria Raquel Casas, Bradley Shreve.

Subjects/Keywords: History; Indigenous Studies; United States History

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Christensen, D. (2016). “The Ground You Walk on Belongs to My People": Lakota Community Building, Activism, and Red Power in Western Nebraska, 1917-2000. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Nevada – Las Vegas. Retrieved from https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/2653

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Christensen, David. ““The Ground You Walk on Belongs to My People": Lakota Community Building, Activism, and Red Power in Western Nebraska, 1917-2000.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Nevada – Las Vegas. Accessed September 22, 2019. https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/2653.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Christensen, David. ““The Ground You Walk on Belongs to My People": Lakota Community Building, Activism, and Red Power in Western Nebraska, 1917-2000.” 2016. Web. 22 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Christensen D. “The Ground You Walk on Belongs to My People": Lakota Community Building, Activism, and Red Power in Western Nebraska, 1917-2000. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Nevada – Las Vegas; 2016. [cited 2019 Sep 22]. Available from: https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/2653.

Council of Science Editors:

Christensen D. “The Ground You Walk on Belongs to My People": Lakota Community Building, Activism, and Red Power in Western Nebraska, 1917-2000. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Nevada – Las Vegas; 2016. Available from: https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/thesesdissertations/2653

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