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You searched for +publisher:"University of Missouri – Columbia" +contributor:("Thornburg, Kathy R."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Missouri – Columbia

1. Lane, Valeri J., 1952-. Emotional labor in early intervention.

Degree: PhD, 2005, University of Missouri – Columbia

The purpose of this study was to examine the scope and impact of emotional labor in early intervention. Focus groups and individual interviews were analyzed to determine the presence of emotional labor in the work, and the impact of emotional labor on participants' personal and professional activities. Findings from this study show emotional labor to be present in the work of Early Head Start home visitors. Participants experienced physical and emotional effects from managing their emotions in order to maintain an appropriate presence with families. Primary factors contributing to emotional labor include a relationship-based approach, the intimacy of the work, and the scope of work with families in poverty. Study participants identified strategies to balance the effects of emotional labor. Implications of this study suggest the need for additional investigation into emotional labor in early intervention, and the implementation of policies that will ameliorate this aspect of early intervention work. Advisors/Committee Members: Thornburg, Kathy R. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Emotions; Stress (Psychology); Family services

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APA (6th Edition):

Lane, Valeri J., 1. (2005). Emotional labor in early intervention. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Missouri – Columbia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4169

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lane, Valeri J., 1952-. “Emotional labor in early intervention.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Missouri – Columbia. Accessed February 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4169.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lane, Valeri J., 1952-. “Emotional labor in early intervention.” 2005. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Lane, Valeri J. 1. Emotional labor in early intervention. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Missouri – Columbia; 2005. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4169.

Council of Science Editors:

Lane, Valeri J. 1. Emotional labor in early intervention. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Missouri – Columbia; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4169


University of Missouri – Columbia

2. Henk, Jennifer K. (Jennifer Katherine). Dyadic reciprocity in the emerging relationship between low-income African American mothers and their toddlers.

Degree: PhD, 2006, University of Missouri – Columbia

The present study will adopt a dual focus: on the description of dyadic reciprocity among mother-child dyads and on the antecedents proposed to influence its development. As research on the nature of dyadic reciprocity as the means of parent-child interaction among African American families is lacking, the first set of goals will be to provide descriptive data on reciprocity in a comprehensive framework for this sample. The second set of goals examined questions regarding individual differences in the development of early reciprocity. Child characteristics, such as temperament, maternal characteristics, such as personality and depression, and dyadic characteristics, such as attachment, were all expected to impact the development of reciprocal interactions. Results are discussed in the contexts of the cultural validity of the dyadic reciprocity construct and potential uses of dyadic reciprocity in early intervention services. Advisors/Committee Members: Thornburg, Kathy R. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: African American mothers; Mother and child; Dyadic analysis (Social sciences)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Henk, J. K. (. K. (2006). Dyadic reciprocity in the emerging relationship between low-income African American mothers and their toddlers. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Missouri – Columbia. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4454

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Henk, Jennifer K (Jennifer Katherine). “Dyadic reciprocity in the emerging relationship between low-income African American mothers and their toddlers.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Missouri – Columbia. Accessed February 19, 2019. https://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4454.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Henk, Jennifer K (Jennifer Katherine). “Dyadic reciprocity in the emerging relationship between low-income African American mothers and their toddlers.” 2006. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Henk JK(K. Dyadic reciprocity in the emerging relationship between low-income African American mothers and their toddlers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Missouri – Columbia; 2006. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4454.

Council of Science Editors:

Henk JK(K. Dyadic reciprocity in the emerging relationship between low-income African American mothers and their toddlers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Missouri – Columbia; 2006. Available from: https://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4454


University of Missouri – Columbia

3. Mathews, Michelle Christine. Measuring the quality of informal home-based care programs.

Degree: PhD, 2006, University of Missouri – Columbia

[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Informal child care has a long history and remains a popular choice for many parents, especially parents with infants and toddlers and families with low-incomes. As researchers we need to know more about informal arrangements, the quality of these programs, and how informal child care is best measured. The purpose of this study is to validate the Quality Instrument for Informal Child Care (QIC) as one measure that can be used to appropriately assess the quality of informal child care arrangements. The overall goal is to develop a reliable and valid tool that can be used by providers, practitioners, and researchers. Results indicate that the QIC has high levels of inter-rater reliability and internal consistency. The QIC was also shown to have face, content, and convergent validity with the Family Day Care Rating Scale (FDCRS) and Caregiver Interaction Scale (CIS). The strengths of the QIC, as compared to the FDCRS, are that it is easier to score, less subjective, and does not require an interview for non-observable items. Due to the simple design, it is also likely that training would be minimal. Because the QIC is highly correlated with the FDCRS and CIS it could be used in lieu of those two instruments and would be a less intrusive alternative for both research and program improvement. Advisors/Committee Members: Thornburg, Kathy R. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Child care; Caregivers; Psychometrics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mathews, M. C. (2006). Measuring the quality of informal home-based care programs. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Missouri – Columbia. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5882

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mathews, Michelle Christine. “Measuring the quality of informal home-based care programs.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Missouri – Columbia. Accessed February 19, 2019. https://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5882.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mathews, Michelle Christine. “Measuring the quality of informal home-based care programs.” 2006. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Mathews MC. Measuring the quality of informal home-based care programs. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Missouri – Columbia; 2006. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5882.

Council of Science Editors:

Mathews MC. Measuring the quality of informal home-based care programs. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Missouri – Columbia; 2006. Available from: https://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5882

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