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You searched for +publisher:"University of Michigan" +contributor:("Van Etten Lee, Michelle"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Levine, Debra Siegel. Discrimination and Identity: An Investigation of How Cultural Correlates Relate to the Expression, Evaluation, and Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2014, University of Michigan

The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate how cultural and racial factors impact the evaluation, expression and treatment of social anxiety disorder (SocAD) in racial minority populations. This investigation involved three distinct, but related projects. The first project used the National Survey of American Life (NSAL), the most comprehensive study of black Americans in the U.S., to investigate how discrimination impacts SocAD at an epidemiological level. Previous work highlighted a strong association between discrimination and mental health symptoms, but few studies have examined the effects of particular types of discrimination on specific anxiety disorders among different black subgroups. In this study, logistic regression analyses indicated that everyday but not major experiences of discrimination are associated with SocAD for African Americans, Caribbean blacks and non-Hispanic whites. The second project investigated cultural correlates of SocAD in a socio-economically deprived, largely minority, job-seeking population. This research built on an existing project in a vocational service setting led by Dr. Joseph Himle, which involved developing and disseminating a cognitive behavioral (CBT) group therapy intervention designed to enhance the employment success of people whose job attainment efforts have been undermined by the presence of SocAD. This study investigated how racial identity and experiences of discrimination relate to SocAD in this population. Our findings indicated that higher levels of racial discrimination and lower levels of private regard were associated with increased SocAD symptoms. The third project in this dissertation evaluated whether the SocAD assessment procedures used at the vocational services center are functioning adequately in this low income, largely minority population. Overall, the Mini-SPIN demonstrated sound psychometric properties in this sample, showing that it can be used as a screener in this population. Given the Mini-SPIN’s brevity combined with ease of scoring and interpretation, it may be able to identify individuals in a variety of settings that may benefit from treatment. Taken together, this dissertation aims to understand SocAD in a culturally and racially sensitive context at both local and national levels to help demonstrate how cultural competence can inform the expression, assessment, and treatment of SocAD. Advisors/Committee Members: Himle, Joseph Alan (committee member), Nagata, Donna Kiyo (committee member), Sellers, Robert M. (committee member), Van Etten Lee, Michelle (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Cultural Correlates of Social Anxiety Disorder; Psychology; Social Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Levine, D. S. (2014). Discrimination and Identity: An Investigation of How Cultural Correlates Relate to the Expression, Evaluation, and Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/107262

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Levine, Debra Siegel. “Discrimination and Identity: An Investigation of How Cultural Correlates Relate to the Expression, Evaluation, and Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed December 01, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/107262.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Levine, Debra Siegel. “Discrimination and Identity: An Investigation of How Cultural Correlates Relate to the Expression, Evaluation, and Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder.” 2014. Web. 01 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Levine DS. Discrimination and Identity: An Investigation of How Cultural Correlates Relate to the Expression, Evaluation, and Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2014. [cited 2020 Dec 01]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/107262.

Council of Science Editors:

Levine DS. Discrimination and Identity: An Investigation of How Cultural Correlates Relate to the Expression, Evaluation, and Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/107262

2. Minonne, Giovanni A. Therapist Adherence, Patient Alliance, and Depression Change in the NIMH Treatment for Depression Collaborative Research Program.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2008, University of Michigan

Using data from the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program (NIMH TDCRP), this dissertation examined the relationship between the patient alliance (Vanderbilt Therapeutic Alliance Scale patient factor) and therapist adherence to five subscales of the Collaborative Study Psychotherapy Rating Scale: Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), Interpersonal Therapy (IPT), Clinical Management (CM), Facilitative Conditions (FC), and Explicit Directiveness (ED) and their influence on depression change as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory. Analyses were conducted using path models examining the interrelationship between early and later alliance and adherence as predictors of depression change for the full TDCRP sample (n = 239) and for each treatment comprising the TDCRP: CBT (n = 59), IPT (n = 61), imipramine plus clinical management (IMI-CM; n = 57), and placebo plus clinical management (PLA-CM; n = 62). The results indicate that, in each of the treatments, early patient alliance predicted later patient alliance, and later patient alliance predicted depression change. Early therapist adherence rarely predicted later therapist adherence and later therapist adherence rarely predicted depression change with the following exceptions. Later IPT adherence predicted greater reductions in depression in IPT and later CBT adherence predicted greater reductions in depression in both IPT and in PLA-CM. Across all the treatments, there was a positive relationship between both IPT and FC adherence and patient alliance, and a negative relationship between both ED and CM adherence and patient alliance. In each treatment group, the relationship between adherence and the patient alliance was different. In IPT, greater ED predicted reduced patient alliance. In CBT and PLA-CM, greater CM adherence predicted reduced patient alliance. Early patient alliance predicted: (a) greater later FC, IPT, and CBT adherence in CBT; (b) greater IPT adherence in IPT; and (c) greater FC adherence in PLA-CM. These results have important implications for psychotherapy training and clinical practice. Particularly relevant are the findings that non-target techniques had a positive influence on patient alliance and depression change, and that therapist directiveness negatively influenced the patient alliance in IPT. In sum, this study highlights the complex interrelationship of relational and technical dimensions of psychotherapy. Advisors/Committee Members: Hatcher, Robert L. (committee member), Pole, Nnamdi (committee member), Flynn, Heather A. (committee member), Peterson, Christopher M. (committee member), Van Etten Lee, Michelle (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Therapist Adherence; Patient Alliance; TDCRP; Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depression; Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapy for Depression; Psychology; Social Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Minonne, G. A. (2008). Therapist Adherence, Patient Alliance, and Depression Change in the NIMH Treatment for Depression Collaborative Research Program. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/60744

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Minonne, Giovanni A. “Therapist Adherence, Patient Alliance, and Depression Change in the NIMH Treatment for Depression Collaborative Research Program.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed December 01, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/60744.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Minonne, Giovanni A. “Therapist Adherence, Patient Alliance, and Depression Change in the NIMH Treatment for Depression Collaborative Research Program.” 2008. Web. 01 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Minonne GA. Therapist Adherence, Patient Alliance, and Depression Change in the NIMH Treatment for Depression Collaborative Research Program. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2008. [cited 2020 Dec 01]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/60744.

Council of Science Editors:

Minonne GA. Therapist Adherence, Patient Alliance, and Depression Change in the NIMH Treatment for Depression Collaborative Research Program. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/60744

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