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You searched for +publisher:"University of Michigan" +contributor:("Tso, Ivy"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Michigan

1. Mueller, Savanna. Paranoid Ideation and Social Anxiety in Undergraduates and Clinical Populations.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2016, University of Michigan

Recent research suggests that paranoia, like other psychiatric symptoms, may exist on a continuum with normal experiences. What pushes people from the normal to the severe end of the continuum has yet to be determined. Theoretical models of paranoia place importance on negative emotion, especially social anxieties, and cognitive reasoning biases. To fully understand the differences in paranoid ideation in non-clinical and schizophrenia populations, more information is needed regarding the causal mechanisms. Experimental paradigms provide the mechanism to test potential pathways through which persecutory ideation can develop. The goal of this study is to reveal mechanisms that may contribute to increases in paranoid ideation by experimentally manipulating fear and by identifying other potential individual factors. A sample of 253 undergraduates was randomly assigned to a neutral or fearful experimental emotion induction. In both conditions, the presence of self-referential thoughts and persecutory ideation was assessed. Following the induction, participants completed ratings of self-referential and persecutory ideation and additional measures of social anxiety, general anxiety, depression and cognitive reasoning biases. These responses were compared to the level of self-referential and persecutory ideation in a sample of 46 individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia who completed self-report ratings of self-referential and persecutory ideation, general anxiety and depression but did not participate in the emotion induction. We found that the fear manipulation increased persecutory and self-referential thoughts in undergraduates. Further, social anxiety and cognitive reasoning biases were related to increases in persecutory ideation, such that the undergraduate group who were high in social anxiety or cognitive biases at baseline had paranoia at equivalent level as the schizophrenia group following emotion induction. This study provides evidence that ideas of reference and persecutory thoughts are not confined to individuals diagnosed with psychotic disorders as they can be enhanced by fear in individuals high on social anxiety and cognitive biases. Together, the results suggest that fearful states, cognitive biases and social anxiety are potential mechanisms for increases in paranoid thought. Advisors/Committee Members: Deldin, Patricia J (committee member), Himle, Joseph Alan (committee member), Lopez-Duran, Nestor L (committee member), Tso, Ivy (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: paranoia; social anxiety; cognitive biases; persecutory ideation; Psychology; Social Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Mueller, S. (2016). Paranoid Ideation and Social Anxiety in Undergraduates and Clinical Populations. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/135866

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mueller, Savanna. “Paranoid Ideation and Social Anxiety in Undergraduates and Clinical Populations.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/135866.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mueller, Savanna. “Paranoid Ideation and Social Anxiety in Undergraduates and Clinical Populations.” 2016. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Mueller S. Paranoid Ideation and Social Anxiety in Undergraduates and Clinical Populations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/135866.

Council of Science Editors:

Mueller S. Paranoid Ideation and Social Anxiety in Undergraduates and Clinical Populations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/135866

2. Grove, Tyler. Emotional Experience, Paranoia, and Probabilistic Reasoning in Schizophrenia.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2018, University of Michigan

Schizophrenia (SZ) is a chronic mental disorder characterized by longstanding and severe social functioning deficits. In trying to better understand psychosocial factors that perpetuate these functional deficits, this dissertation included three studies that examine cognitive and affective factors with the potential to improve functional outcomes in SZ: 1) emotional experience, 2) paranoia, and 3) reasoning. Study one examined negative/positive affect and social functioning with self-report measures among SZ, affective disorders, and the general population. Study 2 assessed paranoia and its relationship with the interpretation of the environment via affective sound localization in SZ. Study 3 compared probabilistic reasoning when estimating the likely source of threatening and non-threatening affective stimuli while also examining the relationship between probabilistic reasoning and delusional thinking in SZ. The findings of this dissertation suggest that for people with schizophrenia: 1) treatment of heightened negative affect and reduced positive affect may improve social functioning, 2) paranoia may aid localization of natural sounds that occur in the environment, and 3) promoting more conservative probabilistic reasoning may help to reduce delusional thinking. Advisors/Committee Members: Deldin, Patricia J (committee member), Tso, Ivy (committee member), Taylor, Stephan F (committee member), Lustig, Cindy Ann (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: psychosis; Psychology; Social Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Grove, T. (2018). Emotional Experience, Paranoia, and Probabilistic Reasoning in Schizophrenia. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/146039

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Grove, Tyler. “Emotional Experience, Paranoia, and Probabilistic Reasoning in Schizophrenia.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/146039.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Grove, Tyler. “Emotional Experience, Paranoia, and Probabilistic Reasoning in Schizophrenia.” 2018. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Grove T. Emotional Experience, Paranoia, and Probabilistic Reasoning in Schizophrenia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2018. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/146039.

Council of Science Editors:

Grove T. Emotional Experience, Paranoia, and Probabilistic Reasoning in Schizophrenia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/146039

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