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You searched for +publisher:"University of Michigan" +contributor:("Strobbe, Stephen"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Michigan

1. Schuh, Amanda L. Building Resilience in Military Families: Development and Evaluation of a Military Child Intervention.

Degree: PhD, Nursing, 2016, University of Michigan

Over two million children in the United States have been directly affected by the deployment of a family service member since 2001. The impact of deployment on these children may pose significant mental health risks and emotional disturbances, including depression, anxiety, and behavioral problems. However, many military children and family members do exhibit resilience and thrive throughout the deployment cycle. A modified Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment and Adaptation was used to inform further exploration of resilience and child adjustment in military children. This dissertation includes three papers, each addressing mental health and resilience in military children. First, a detailed quantitative analysis paper reviews the effect of maternal stress and mental health on child adjustment in the context of a military deployment. A longitudinal study was conducted with National Guard family members who experienced a deployment, with a focus on maternal perspectives of positive and negative child adjustment outcomes before and after a military deployment. Results indicated that maternal mental health and parenting stress significantly predicted adverse child adjustment during pre- and post-deployment. In the second paper, a review of the literature examined current evidence-based interventions to promote resilience in military families. This paper introduces the concept of resilience and reviews opportunities to incorporate strength-based skills into clinical interventions. Despite the need for interventions to address the unique needs of military children, limited programs are currently available. Recommendations for future interventions are presented. Finally, the third paper introduces a resiliency intervention for military children and discusses its pilot findings. A case series was performed to provide detailed descriptive information from intervention participants. Parent-report of child mental health revealed a reduction in total emotional and behavioral difficulties after participation in the intervention. Participants reported reduced depression, anxiety, household chaos, and parenting stress after program participation. Findings indicated adequate feasibility and acceptability from participants. In summary, these findings contribute to greater understanding of resilience and child adjustment outcomes in military children. Future work should focus on continued intervention development and evaluation to provide evidence-based programs for integration into nursing research and practice. Advisors/Committee Members: Hagerty, Bonnie M (committee member), Himle, Joseph Alan (committee member), Strobbe, Stephen (committee member), Sullivan, Barbara-Jean (committee member), Boyd, Carol J (committee member), Kees, Michelle Renee (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Military Child; Intervention; Parenting Stress and Household Chaos; Resilience; Deployment; Nursing; Nursing; Health Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schuh, A. L. (2016). Building Resilience in Military Families: Development and Evaluation of a Military Child Intervention. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/133435

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schuh, Amanda L. “Building Resilience in Military Families: Development and Evaluation of a Military Child Intervention.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/133435.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schuh, Amanda L. “Building Resilience in Military Families: Development and Evaluation of a Military Child Intervention.” 2016. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Schuh AL. Building Resilience in Military Families: Development and Evaluation of a Military Child Intervention. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2016. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/133435.

Council of Science Editors:

Schuh AL. Building Resilience in Military Families: Development and Evaluation of a Military Child Intervention. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/133435

2. Hoyland Domenico, Lisa. Self-Schemas as Cognitive Foundations for Impaired Problem Recognition in Alcohol Use Disorder.

Degree: PhD, Nursing, 2015, University of Michigan

Background: Impaired problem recognition (IPR) has been identified as the primary barrier that must be overcome in order for alcohol use disorder (AUD) treatment and recovery to be successful. However, the cognitive mechanisms undergirding IPR continue to remain poorly understood. The Self-Schema Model of the Self-Concept has the potential to identify the structural and functional properties of neurocognitive networks undergirding IPR and drinking behavior. The purpose of this cross-sectional correlational study was, first, to determine the availability of a drinking-related self-schema among individuals who met criteria for moderate to severe alcohol use disorder, in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, 5th Edition. In the presence of a drinking-related self-schema, subsequent goals were to 1) identify structural properties (i.e., valence and elaboration) and, 2) establish relationships between these structural properties and IPR. Methods: The sample consisted of 55 men and women, over the age of 21, recruited from sobriety courts, public advertisements, and personal referrals in a Midwestern state. Participants completed measures related to alcohol use, the self-concept, problem recognition, and treatment-seeking. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson product-moment correlation, and multiple regression. Results: All participants displayed availability of a drinking-related self-schema comprised predominantly of negatively valenced content. Elaboration of the drinking-related self-schema was negatively correlated with taking steps toward recovery (r= -.35, n=55, p<.01) and positively correlated with frequency of drinking (r=.41, n=55, p<.01). Negative valence was positively correlated with problem recognition (r= .49, n=55, p<.01) and ambivalence (r= .34, n=55, p<.05). Positive valence was negatively correlated with problem recognition (r= -.40, n=55, p<.01). Elaboration and valence of a drinking-related self-schema predicted impaired problem recognition (R2 adjusted=0.37, F(8,46)=4.99, p<.001). Elaboration of a recovery-related self-schema predicted taking steps toward modifying drinking behaviors (R2 adjusted=0.46, F(8,46)=6.81, p<.001). Elaboration of a recovery-related self-schema and elaboration of a drinking-related self-schema predicted frequency of drinking (R2 adjusted=0.24, F(4, 50)=5.17, p<.001). Conclusion: Findings suggest that structural properties of a drinking-related self-schema influence problem recognition, drinking, and recovery behaviors. Therapeutic interventions directed toward modifying valence and elaboration of drinking-related self-schemas may offer promising new treatment options for alcohol use disorder. Advisors/Committee Members: Pressler, Susan Jane (committee member), Strobbe, Stephen (committee member), Giordani, Bruno J. (committee member), Hagerty, Bonnie M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Alcohol Use Disorder; Neurocognition; Self-Schema; Problem Recognition; Treatment Seeking; Drinking Behavior; Nursing; Health Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hoyland Domenico, L. (2015). Self-Schemas as Cognitive Foundations for Impaired Problem Recognition in Alcohol Use Disorder. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113314

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hoyland Domenico, Lisa. “Self-Schemas as Cognitive Foundations for Impaired Problem Recognition in Alcohol Use Disorder.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113314.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hoyland Domenico, Lisa. “Self-Schemas as Cognitive Foundations for Impaired Problem Recognition in Alcohol Use Disorder.” 2015. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Hoyland Domenico L. Self-Schemas as Cognitive Foundations for Impaired Problem Recognition in Alcohol Use Disorder. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2015. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113314.

Council of Science Editors:

Hoyland Domenico L. Self-Schemas as Cognitive Foundations for Impaired Problem Recognition in Alcohol Use Disorder. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113314

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