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You searched for +publisher:"University of Michigan" +contributor:("Schultz, Celia E."). Showing records 1 – 10 of 10 total matches.

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University of Michigan

1. Allen, Kate. Stop and Smell the Romans: Odor in Roman Literature.

Degree: PhD, Classical Studies, 2015, University of Michigan

 In this dissertation, I examine the role of smell in Latin literature. Looking specifically at Roman comedy, epic, and epigram, I demonstrate both how smells… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: smell; sense perception; Latin literature; Roman culture; Classical Studies; Humanities

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APA (6th Edition):

Allen, K. (2015). Stop and Smell the Romans: Odor in Roman Literature. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/116729

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Allen, Kate. “Stop and Smell the Romans: Odor in Roman Literature.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/116729.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Allen, Kate. “Stop and Smell the Romans: Odor in Roman Literature.” 2015. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Allen K. Stop and Smell the Romans: Odor in Roman Literature. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/116729.

Council of Science Editors:

Allen K. Stop and Smell the Romans: Odor in Roman Literature. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/116729


University of Michigan

2. ten Berge, Bram L. H. Tacitus on Principate and Empire: from the Agricola to the Annales.

Degree: PhD, Classical Studies, 2016, University of Michigan

 This dissertation is a holistic examination of the relationship and interactions between Tacitus’ early monographs (the Agricola, Germania, and Dialogus de Oratoribus) and his later… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Tacitus; Roman Historiography; relationship and interactions between the opera minora and opera maiora; Agricola; Germania; Dialogus de Oratoribus; Classical Studies; Humanities

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APA (6th Edition):

ten Berge, B. L. H. (2016). Tacitus on Principate and Empire: from the Agricola to the Annales. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/120889

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

ten Berge, Bram L H. “Tacitus on Principate and Empire: from the Agricola to the Annales.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/120889.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

ten Berge, Bram L H. “Tacitus on Principate and Empire: from the Agricola to the Annales.” 2016. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

ten Berge BLH. Tacitus on Principate and Empire: from the Agricola to the Annales. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/120889.

Council of Science Editors:

ten Berge BLH. Tacitus on Principate and Empire: from the Agricola to the Annales. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/120889


University of Michigan

3. Loehndorff, Louise. Translation as Narrative and Translator as Active Guide: Rufinus' Process of Translating Origen's Narrative of the Soul's Descent.

Degree: PhD, Classical Studies, 2018, University of Michigan

 This dissertation is invested in an interdisciplinary approach to the study of translation in the antique world. From this perspective, the project demonstrates how the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Rufinus; Origen; moral psychology; Evagrius; Classical Studies; Linguistics; Philosophy; Religious Studies; Humanities

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APA (6th Edition):

Loehndorff, L. (2018). Translation as Narrative and Translator as Active Guide: Rufinus' Process of Translating Origen's Narrative of the Soul's Descent. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/145960

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Loehndorff, Louise. “Translation as Narrative and Translator as Active Guide: Rufinus' Process of Translating Origen's Narrative of the Soul's Descent.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/145960.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Loehndorff, Louise. “Translation as Narrative and Translator as Active Guide: Rufinus' Process of Translating Origen's Narrative of the Soul's Descent.” 2018. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Loehndorff L. Translation as Narrative and Translator as Active Guide: Rufinus' Process of Translating Origen's Narrative of the Soul's Descent. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/145960.

Council of Science Editors:

Loehndorff L. Translation as Narrative and Translator as Active Guide: Rufinus' Process of Translating Origen's Narrative of the Soul's Descent. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/145960


University of Michigan

4. Brock, Andrea L. Rome at Its Core: Reconstructing the Environment and Topography of the Forum Boarium.

Degree: PhD, Classical Art & Archaeology, 2017, University of Michigan

 This dissertation presents the results of a recent geoarchaeological investigation in the heart of Rome. Using an interdisciplinary approach with underutilized methodologies, namely coring survey… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Roman Archaeology; Environmental Reconstruction; Prehistoric Rome; Classical Studies; History (General); Humanities; Social Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Brock, A. L. (2017). Rome at Its Core: Reconstructing the Environment and Topography of the Forum Boarium. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/138718

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brock, Andrea L. “Rome at Its Core: Reconstructing the Environment and Topography of the Forum Boarium.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/138718.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brock, Andrea L. “Rome at Its Core: Reconstructing the Environment and Topography of the Forum Boarium.” 2017. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Brock AL. Rome at Its Core: Reconstructing the Environment and Topography of the Forum Boarium. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/138718.

Council of Science Editors:

Brock AL. Rome at Its Core: Reconstructing the Environment and Topography of the Forum Boarium. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/138718


University of Michigan

5. Diffendale, Daniel. The Roman Middle Republic at Sant'Omobono.

Degree: PhD, Classical Art & Archaeology, 2017, University of Michigan

 This dissertation presents the results of an analysis of the middle Republican (ca. 4th–3rd c. BCE) architectural remains of the Roman temples of Fortuna and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Roman archaeology; Temples of Fortuna and Mater Matuta; Roman architecture; Roman religious practice during the Middle Republic; Roman use of tuff (tufo); Roman temples; Architecture; Art History; Classical Studies; History (General); Humanities (General); Anthropology and Archaeology; Arts; Humanities; Social Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Diffendale, D. (2017). The Roman Middle Republic at Sant'Omobono. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/138777

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Diffendale, Daniel. “The Roman Middle Republic at Sant'Omobono.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/138777.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Diffendale, Daniel. “The Roman Middle Republic at Sant'Omobono.” 2017. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Diffendale D. The Roman Middle Republic at Sant'Omobono. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/138777.

Council of Science Editors:

Diffendale D. The Roman Middle Republic at Sant'Omobono. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/138777


University of Michigan

6. Zapelloni Pavia, Arianna. Cultural Change in the Religious Sphere of Ancient Umbria between the Sixth and the First century BCE.

Degree: PhD, Classical Art & Archaeology, 2020, University of Michigan

 This dissertation examines the architecture and votive deposits from Umbrian sanctuaries between the sixth and early first century BCE. In line with traditional approaches to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Pre-Roman Italy; Sacred places; Roman expansion; Archaeology of religion; Classical Studies; Humanities

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APA (6th Edition):

Zapelloni Pavia, A. (2020). Cultural Change in the Religious Sphere of Ancient Umbria between the Sixth and the First century BCE. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/155029

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zapelloni Pavia, Arianna. “Cultural Change in the Religious Sphere of Ancient Umbria between the Sixth and the First century BCE.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/155029.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zapelloni Pavia, Arianna. “Cultural Change in the Religious Sphere of Ancient Umbria between the Sixth and the First century BCE.” 2020. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Zapelloni Pavia A. Cultural Change in the Religious Sphere of Ancient Umbria between the Sixth and the First century BCE. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2020. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/155029.

Council of Science Editors:

Zapelloni Pavia A. Cultural Change in the Religious Sphere of Ancient Umbria between the Sixth and the First century BCE. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/155029


University of Michigan

7. Fertik, Harriet H. Publicity, Privacy, and Power in Neronian Rome.

Degree: PhD, Classical Studies, 2014, University of Michigan

 I examine Roman ideas of public and private and their relationship to the conception of absolute power. My study synthesizes a wide range of literary… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Roman Political Culture; Nero; Seneca; Lucan; Roman Visual Culture; Public and Private; Classical Studies; Humanities

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APA (6th Edition):

Fertik, H. H. (2014). Publicity, Privacy, and Power in Neronian Rome. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/109041

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fertik, Harriet H. “Publicity, Privacy, and Power in Neronian Rome.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/109041.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fertik, Harriet H. “Publicity, Privacy, and Power in Neronian Rome.” 2014. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Fertik HH. Publicity, Privacy, and Power in Neronian Rome. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/109041.

Council of Science Editors:

Fertik HH. Publicity, Privacy, and Power in Neronian Rome. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/109041

8. Stimson, Jacqueline. Killing Romans: Legitimizing Violence in Cicero and Caesar.

Degree: PhD, Classical Studies, 2017, University of Michigan

 In this dissertation, I examine Cicero and Caesar’s attitudes towards the legality of executing Roman citizens in the name of the state, with a particular… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Roman history and literature; Gaius Julius Caesar; Marcus Tullius Cicero; Violence and Politics; Classical Studies; Humanities

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APA (6th Edition):

Stimson, J. (2017). Killing Romans: Legitimizing Violence in Cicero and Caesar. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/137159

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stimson, Jacqueline. “Killing Romans: Legitimizing Violence in Cicero and Caesar.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/137159.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stimson, Jacqueline. “Killing Romans: Legitimizing Violence in Cicero and Caesar.” 2017. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Stimson J. Killing Romans: Legitimizing Violence in Cicero and Caesar. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/137159.

Council of Science Editors:

Stimson J. Killing Romans: Legitimizing Violence in Cicero and Caesar. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/137159

9. Groves, Joseph Viguers. Ethics and Imperialism in Livy.

Degree: PhD, Classical Studies, 2013, University of Michigan

 Ethics and Imperialism in Livy This dissertation shows that, during the mid Republic, the Romans evaluated the justice of their wars in terms of fides,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Roman History; Historiography; Latin; Imperialism; Classical Studies; Humanities

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APA (6th Edition):

Groves, J. V. (2013). Ethics and Imperialism in Livy. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97998

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Groves, Joseph Viguers. “Ethics and Imperialism in Livy.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97998.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Groves, Joseph Viguers. “Ethics and Imperialism in Livy.” 2013. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Groves JV. Ethics and Imperialism in Livy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97998.

Council of Science Editors:

Groves JV. Ethics and Imperialism in Livy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97998

10. Kemmerle, Allison. The Performance of Identity in Classical Athens.

Degree: PhD, Greek and Roman History, 2019, University of Michigan

 Between 350 and 330 BCE, Athenians, facing growing anxieties about attacks on the citizen body, passed a series of laws that penalized foreigners who usurped… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Classical Athens; civic identity; performance studies; Classical Studies; Humanities

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APA (6th Edition):

Kemmerle, A. (2019). The Performance of Identity in Classical Athens. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/149997

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kemmerle, Allison. “The Performance of Identity in Classical Athens.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/149997.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kemmerle, Allison. “The Performance of Identity in Classical Athens.” 2019. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Kemmerle A. The Performance of Identity in Classical Athens. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/149997.

Council of Science Editors:

Kemmerle A. The Performance of Identity in Classical Athens. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/149997

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