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You searched for +publisher:"University of Michigan" +contributor:("Nagata, Donna K."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Michigan

1. Downey, Christina A. Lay Theories of Health: Multidimensional Conceptualizations of What Comprises Health in Young and Middle-Aged Adults.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2008, University of Michigan

The present research sought to identify the content, structure, and conceptual and behavioral correlates of lay theories of health in young and middle-aged adults. Lay theories of health are the unarticulated beliefs of laypeople about what it is to be healthy. These theories were assessed in a Prestudy through open-ended survey questioning of 262 adults at four community sites, as well as nationally over the Internet. After an initial coding and judgment process by trained research assistants, 325 distinct responses to the item asking participants to describe a “very healthy person” were identified. Further judgment resulted in an item pool of 259 items to be studied in the next stage of the research. These responses were then rated on their importance to health by laypeople and by experts in separate studies (Studies 1 and 1b). Lay and expert theories about dimensions of health were compared, and some differences were revealed. Items which were rated as most important to health by laypeople (95 items) were administered to a third sample of adult laypeople over the Internet (Study 2), along with some other reliable and valid wellness measures. Participants also rated a set of five empirically-derived profiles of fictional individuals on their healthiness and unhealthiness. These profiles were comprised of items which had been rated as important to health in Study 1 (e.g., by laypeople). Ratings of these profiles showed the hypothesized pattern of increasing with higher correspondence to an “ideal” health profile. Responses to the 95 layperson-generated items were analyzed through exploratory factor analytic procedures, and five dimensions of health were identified. These were labeled Social-Emotional Health, Positive Health Practices, Absence of Illness, Absence of Stress and Anxiety, and Adequate Rest. A new measure of lay theories of health was created measuring these dimensions, as well as a summary score called Multidimensional Health. Initial validation of this measure was conducted through comparing it to the other measures of well-being administered in Study 2, and through its associations with self-reports of selected health behaviors. Findings were discussed in relation to clinical practice, research in other disciplines, and various theories of health behavior. Advisors/Committee Members: Chang, Edward C. (committee member), Metzl, Jonathan Michel (committee member), Nagata, Donna K. (committee member), Peterson, Christopher M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Lay Theories; Multidimensional Health; Lay Theories of Health Inventory; Psychology; Social Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Downey, C. A. (2008). Lay Theories of Health: Multidimensional Conceptualizations of What Comprises Health in Young and Middle-Aged Adults. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/58386

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Downey, Christina A. “Lay Theories of Health: Multidimensional Conceptualizations of What Comprises Health in Young and Middle-Aged Adults.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/58386.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Downey, Christina A. “Lay Theories of Health: Multidimensional Conceptualizations of What Comprises Health in Young and Middle-Aged Adults.” 2008. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Downey CA. Lay Theories of Health: Multidimensional Conceptualizations of What Comprises Health in Young and Middle-Aged Adults. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2008. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/58386.

Council of Science Editors:

Downey CA. Lay Theories of Health: Multidimensional Conceptualizations of What Comprises Health in Young and Middle-Aged Adults. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/58386


University of Michigan

2. Cheng, Wendy J. Y. Overt and covert narcissism in Asian Americans, European Americans, and Asians.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2004, University of Michigan

Many contemporary theorists view people of Asian descent as less narcissistic than those of European descent. Empirical studies on narcissistic personality characteristics, in fact, attributed Asians' and Asian Americans' lower narcissism scores to their cultural upbringing. Two studies examined differential overt and covert narcissism expression in second generation Asian American, European American, and Asian undergraduate students. Study 1 showed that 100 second generation Asian Americans and 40 Asians, compared to 100 European Americans were more likely to express covert narcissism. There were no ethnocultural differences in overall overt narcissism expression but European Americans reported higher scores on the authoritativeness, superiority, and self-sufficiency overt narcissism subscales than Asian Americans. Modesty was negatively associated with overt narcissism but not associated with covert narcissism in European Americans and Asian Americans. European American and Asian American ethnic identities were positively correlated with overt narcissism while only Asian American ethnic identity was negatively correlated with covert narcissism. Neither modesty nor Asian ethnic identity was significantly associated with overt and covert narcissism in Asians. Study 2 replicated the findings by showing that 100 second generation Asian Americans, compared to 100 European Americans, reported more covert narcissism and equivalent overt narcissism. Asian Americans also reported more interdependent self construal and equivalent independent self construal as European Americans. Shame was positively correlated with covert narcissism for European Americans and Asian Americans but negatively correlated with overt narcissism for only Asian Americans. Both European Americans and Asian Americans with high scores on the covert narcissism scales reported lower subjective well-being. Results are discussed in terms of research, clinical and educational implications. Advisors/Committee Members: Nagata, Donna K. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Americans; Asian-american; Asians; Authoritativeness; Covert; European; Narcissism; Overt; Self-sufficiency

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cheng, W. J. Y. (2004). Overt and covert narcissism in Asian Americans, European Americans, and Asians. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/124377

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cheng, Wendy J Y. “Overt and covert narcissism in Asian Americans, European Americans, and Asians.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/124377.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cheng, Wendy J Y. “Overt and covert narcissism in Asian Americans, European Americans, and Asians.” 2004. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Cheng WJY. Overt and covert narcissism in Asian Americans, European Americans, and Asians. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2004. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/124377.

Council of Science Editors:

Cheng WJY. Overt and covert narcissism in Asian Americans, European Americans, and Asians. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/124377


University of Michigan

3. Banks, Josette Victoria. African Americans' perception of psychotherapists and the psychotherapy process.

Degree: PhD, Social Sciences, 2001, University of Michigan

Research suggests that in comparison to European Americans African Americans: are less likely to utilize mental health services; hold more negative expectations and attitudes about the mental health system; more likely to be focused on cultural or racial content in therapy sessions; and, more wary and concerned about therapist cultural competence. The present study used a video review methodology to determine if similar findings would emerge when examining African American and European American students' perceptions of a videotaped psychotherapy interaction. Sixty one African American and 61 European American female undergraduates completed a counseling expectations questionnaire prior to viewing one of two equivalent video versions of an enacted therapy interaction between a female European American therapist and female African American client. The therapist's response in the universal video version focused on issues universal to all people and omitted any reference to race, while the therapist's response in the cultural video version included racial issues raised by the client. Participants completed general evaluations of the therapist and interaction. They then viewed the video a second time, stopping the playback and commenting on whenever they thought a significant event had occurred. Next, participants completed questionnaires to assess their previous experience with psychotherapy and level of ethnic identity development. It was hypothesized that, in comparison to European American participants, African American study participants would: have significantly lower counseling expectations and evaluations of the therapist and interaction; have significantly more racially targeted words in their review commentary; stop the video significantly more times during review of, and give higher ratings to, the therapist in the cultural version; and, stop the video and speak significantly less during the video review. Data analyses provided partial evidence for African American participants having less positive expectations regarding psychotherapy; being more concerned with cultural content; and, being wary of the experimental situation. No evidence was found for African American participants being more concerned with therapist cultural competence. Results are discussed in terms of research and clinical implications. Advisors/Committee Members: Nagata, Donna K. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: African-americans; Counseling Expectations; Perception; Process; Psychotherapists; Psychotherapy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Banks, J. V. (2001). African Americans' perception of psychotherapists and the psychotherapy process. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/124723

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Banks, Josette Victoria. “African Americans' perception of psychotherapists and the psychotherapy process.” 2001. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/124723.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Banks, Josette Victoria. “African Americans' perception of psychotherapists and the psychotherapy process.” 2001. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Banks JV. African Americans' perception of psychotherapists and the psychotherapy process. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2001. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/124723.

Council of Science Editors:

Banks JV. African Americans' perception of psychotherapists and the psychotherapy process. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2001. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/124723

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