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You searched for +publisher:"University of Michigan" +contributor:("French, Katherine L."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Brown, Ayanna Sheree. 'That peace shall always dwell among them and true love be upheld’: Charity, the Seven Works of Mercy, and Lay Fellowship in Late Medieval and Early Reformation England.

Degree: PhD, History, 2014, University of Michigan

This study utilizes legal documents, literature, religious drama, art, and material culture in a two-fold examination of the gendering of the Christian virtue of charity as effected through the works of mercy. First, it explores charity as a “religious ideology” imagined by clerics, who sought to shape lay conduct through a catechetical program that both implicitly and explicitly advocated different methods of charitable living for men and women. By situating clerical pedagogy within medieval gender theories, this dissertation considers how the clergy adapted their teachings on charity to accommodate men’s and women’s social roles. Second, focusing on Lincolnshire, it investigates the different ways men and women responded to this clerical educational initiative in their religious practices and in daily life. By foregrounding the central role women played in the practice of the works of mercy, and considering ecclesiastical mechanisms of control and uniformity in conversation with the varying responses of the laity (reception and practice), this project demonstrates that late medieval catechesis had deeper social resonance than scholars have hitherto allowed. Charity was a fundamental component of medieval Christian doctrine, essential to understanding medieval piety. Therefore, this dissertation’s assessment of the effects clerical didactic efforts had on ordinary English men and women as they practiced their religion sheds light on a crucial aspect of medieval culture. It considers the influence of the clergy’s educational program by examining the laity’s performance of charity through an investigation of their charitable bequests, the corporate behavior of parish guilds, and sanctions against disobedience found in ecclesiastical and civic court records. By thus addressing the relationship between prescription and action between 1388 and 1534, this study traces evolving interpretations of a key Christian value, charity, at a crucial time in Christian history. In addition, this dissertation explores the gendered conceptions of charity that complicated the relationship between religious instruction and practice. While gendering charity gave women’s work a spiritual imperative and religious significance, it simultaneously reinforced traditional gender roles. Finally, a focus on the local contexts of lay catechetical appropriation demonstrates that pre-Reformation religious education affected laypeople more profoundly than earlier Reformation scholars had imagined. Advisors/Committee Members: French, Katherine L. (committee member), Green, Thomas A. (committee member), Sanok, Catherine (committee member), Squatriti, Paolo (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Medieval Religious Pedagogy and Practice; History (General); Humanities

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brown, A. S. (2014). 'That peace shall always dwell among them and true love be upheld’: Charity, the Seven Works of Mercy, and Lay Fellowship in Late Medieval and Early Reformation England. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/108982

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brown, Ayanna Sheree. “'That peace shall always dwell among them and true love be upheld’: Charity, the Seven Works of Mercy, and Lay Fellowship in Late Medieval and Early Reformation England.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed August 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/108982.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brown, Ayanna Sheree. “'That peace shall always dwell among them and true love be upheld’: Charity, the Seven Works of Mercy, and Lay Fellowship in Late Medieval and Early Reformation England.” 2014. Web. 24 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Brown AS. 'That peace shall always dwell among them and true love be upheld’: Charity, the Seven Works of Mercy, and Lay Fellowship in Late Medieval and Early Reformation England. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2014. [cited 2019 Aug 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/108982.

Council of Science Editors:

Brown AS. 'That peace shall always dwell among them and true love be upheld’: Charity, the Seven Works of Mercy, and Lay Fellowship in Late Medieval and Early Reformation England. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/108982


University of Michigan

2. Kamali, Elizabeth Papp. A Felonious State of Mind: Mens Rea in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century England.

Degree: PhD, History, 2015, University of Michigan

This dissertation explores the role of mens rea, or guilty mind, as a factor in jury assessments of guilt and innocence during the first two centuries of the English criminal trial jury, from the early thirteenth through the fourteenth century. Drawing upon evidence from the plea rolls, but also relying heavily upon non-legal textual sources, including popular literature and guides for confessors, I argue that mind was central to how jurors determined whether a particular defendant should be convicted, pardoned, or acquitted outright. I analyze the meaning of the word “felony,” demonstrating that its meaning was considerably more complex in the medieval context than it is now, when it tends to serve as a placeholder for a category of serious crime. An examination of the word’s use in medieval England’s three primary languages—Latin, Middle English, and Anglo-Norman French—reveals that “felony” was often used interchangeably with such concepts as malice, iniquity, treason, and evil. Furthermore, jury acquittals and pardon recommendations reveal a default understanding of felony that involved, in its paradigmatic form, three essential elements: an act that was reasoned, willed in a way not constrained by necessity, and evil or wicked in its essence. Further chapters explore the complicating role of anger, which could exacerbate or reduce the level of guilt attached to an alleged felony; the contours and mechanisms of guilt assessment, including the gradation of particular sins and crimes and the use of confession to access guilty mind; and the peculiar dangers and difficulties involved in the task of judging, a task shared by judges and jurors within the medieval English system of felony adjudication. The dissertation engages with a long-standing discussion on the history of the medieval English criminal trial jury while also initiating a new discourse on this early chapter in the long Anglo-American history of ideas about criminal responsibility. It introduces a new methodological approach for the study of the early criminal trial jury, placing legal texts within a broader cultural context in order to illuminate the concerns of jurors otherwise largely silenced by the formality and brevity of the legal record. Advisors/Committee Members: Green, Thomas A. (committee member), Donahue Jr, Charles (committee member), Sanok, Catherine (committee member), French, Katherine L. (committee member), Hughes, Diane Owen (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: History of Mens Rea; History of Criminal Intent; Medieval English Legal History; History of the Criminal Trial Jury; Criminal Law and Emotion; History (General); Humanities

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kamali, E. P. (2015). A Felonious State of Mind: Mens Rea in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century England. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113574

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kamali, Elizabeth Papp. “A Felonious State of Mind: Mens Rea in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century England.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed August 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113574.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kamali, Elizabeth Papp. “A Felonious State of Mind: Mens Rea in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century England.” 2015. Web. 24 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Kamali EP. A Felonious State of Mind: Mens Rea in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century England. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2015. [cited 2019 Aug 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113574.

Council of Science Editors:

Kamali EP. A Felonious State of Mind: Mens Rea in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century England. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113574

3. Groves, Joseph Viguers. Ethics and Imperialism in Livy.

Degree: PhD, Classical Studies, 2013, University of Michigan

Ethics and Imperialism in Livy This dissertation shows that, during the mid Republic, the Romans evaluated the justice of their wars in terms of fides, “good faith,” a concept which, although conceived in terms of mutual obligation and benefaction, subtly advanced Roman hegemony and fostered expansion. Because defending allies was integral to fides, this model preserves much of the familiar and largely successful narrative of Roman expansion while providing a more internally consistent idea of how the Romans themselves justified their increasingly heavy-handed interventions in the eastern Mediterranean. This avoids the ethical anachronism of “defensive imperialism” that has dominated scholarship on Roman imperialism and highlights the internal consistency of the Romans own explanations of their wars. Because this model does not exclude aggression, it better explains how Rome could extend its influence and territory while denying the legitimacy of wars undertaken purely for conquest’s sake. Throughout Livy’s first ten books, the Romans attempt to obtain security by cultivating asymmetrical fides relationships with their neighbors, but learn that they must also enforce obedience through metus,fear. Livy imagines early Romans erring on the side of generosity and applying greater force with reluctance, as after the Latin revolt. This highly idealized version of Roman foreign policy may be the stuff of legend, but the ethics underlying the account were integral to Roman diplomacy. That this emphasis on fides also pervades Polybius’ own account indicates that this was a live concern that shaped how the Romans conceived of and justified their wars both at home and abroad. It also provides a more robust explanation of Roman expansion in the Greek world. The failure of the Greeks to put aside their quarrels, and Macedon its ambition, following Rome’s lead in return for what the Romans regarded as generous treatment, convinced the Romans that stability and security could only be achieved by a greater show of force. Even in the sack Corinth, and the most cynical Roman act, the obliteration of Carthage, it was not Roman power, but those cities’ breach of fides that the Romans held up to give their actions legitimacy. Advisors/Committee Members: Potter, David S. (committee member), French, Katherine L. (committee member), Terrenato, Nicola (committee member), Schultz, Celia E. (committee member), Forsdyke, Sara (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Roman History; Historiography; Latin; Imperialism; Classical Studies; Humanities

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Groves, J. V. (2013). Ethics and Imperialism in Livy. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97998

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Groves, Joseph Viguers. “Ethics and Imperialism in Livy.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed August 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97998.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Groves, Joseph Viguers. “Ethics and Imperialism in Livy.” 2013. Web. 24 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Groves JV. Ethics and Imperialism in Livy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2013. [cited 2019 Aug 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97998.

Council of Science Editors:

Groves JV. Ethics and Imperialism in Livy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97998

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