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You searched for +publisher:"University of Michigan" +contributor:("Cardinale, Brad"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Weber, Caitlin. Ecological Impacts of Invasive Rat Removal on Mediterranean Sea Islands.

Degree: MS, Natural Resources and Environment, 2014, University of Michigan

Travel and trade activities have caused the worldwide spread of invasive species possibly resulting in ecological disruption. Rats (Rattus spp.) are one of the most widespread invasive species as their broad diet allows them to take advantage of various food sources. On island ecosystems, rats are thought to increase predation pressure on native flora and fauna, compete with native species for resources, and alter island characteristics such as nutrient availability. Rat eradication projects are becoming a common means to restore island communities; however, management is labor intensive and expensive. This makes it critical that eradication efforts are studied to determine effectiveness and target sites for management. This project evaluates the short-term impact of rat eradication on 15 islands supporting rats in the Aegean Sea (Greece): seven control and eight treatment sites. On each site, I collected baseline data on all levels of the islands food-web: vegetation biomass, invertebrate biomass and diversity, lizard density, and seabird abundance. Rats were then eradicated from all treatment islands using Brodifacoum baits. The same set of ecological data were collected one year following rat removal and changes were compared using control islands to correct for annual variation. I found minimal changes in ecosystem condition following rat removal. I speculate that sites with a long period of rat colonization have lost species susceptible to rats and do not rapidly respond to eradication. Most study sites likely supported rats for many years. However, one treatment site was colonized by rats for only one year. This site shows a higher degree of positive change when compared to averages for control sites and other eradication islands. While more research is needed, it is possible that species vulnerable to rats persist on sites with a short period of rat colonization allowing for a quick recovery following eradication. It is also possible that, in the Aegean, one year is insufficient time for sites to respond to eradication. Advisors/Committee Members: Foufopolous, Johannes (advisor), Cardinale, Brad (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Invasive Species; Rats; Island Ecology; Eradication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Weber, C. (2014). Ecological Impacts of Invasive Rat Removal on Mediterranean Sea Islands. (Masters Thesis). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/106545

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Weber, Caitlin. “Ecological Impacts of Invasive Rat Removal on Mediterranean Sea Islands.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Michigan. Accessed May 31, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/106545.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Weber, Caitlin. “Ecological Impacts of Invasive Rat Removal on Mediterranean Sea Islands.” 2014. Web. 31 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Weber C. Ecological Impacts of Invasive Rat Removal on Mediterranean Sea Islands. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Michigan; 2014. [cited 2020 May 31]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/106545.

Council of Science Editors:

Weber C. Ecological Impacts of Invasive Rat Removal on Mediterranean Sea Islands. [Masters Thesis]. University of Michigan; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/106545

2. Nolan, Madeline. Diversity of Algae Slows Growth of Microcystis.

Degree: MS, Natural Resources and Environment, 2015, University of Michigan

As harmful algal blooms (HABs) have expanded in both size and scope, there have been increased efforts to design models that try to predict which ecosystems are at the greatest risk for a bloom. However, predicting blooms is a difficult process that has had limited success which we believe partly stems from the fact that efforts to date have considered a relatively small set of variables that influence algal growth. In particular, the focus on hydrology and abiotic conditions fails to consider biotic interactions that ultimately control the final composition of ecological communities. In this study we examined how species richness of resident green algae influenced the growth and carrying capacity of Microcystis in both low and high nutrient environments. We found that when either nitrogen or phosphorous were reduced, competition with green algae had a significant negative impact on the growth rate and final biomass of Microcystis, but the species richness of the green algal assemblage had no discernible effect on outcomes. However, in a high nutrient environment, a species rich community of green algae had a greater negative impact on the invasion success of Microcystis than a species-poor community. These results suggest that biotic interactions with phytoplankton can be important in limiting the establishment and proliferation of HAB species like Microcystis, and diverse communities can be more resistant to proliferation of HABs under nutrient conditions that favor blooms. In the future, the inclusion of biotic variables that influence bloom formation, in addition to the physical and abiotic requirements of a HAB species, could more accurately predict HAB events allowing for more effective management of our freshwater resources in the future. Advisors/Committee Members: Cardinale, Brad (advisor), Allan, J. David (committee member), Johengen, Thomas (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: microcystis; harmful algae; species richness; Lake Erie

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nolan, M. (2015). Diversity of Algae Slows Growth of Microcystis. (Masters Thesis). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113075

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nolan, Madeline. “Diversity of Algae Slows Growth of Microcystis.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Michigan. Accessed May 31, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113075.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nolan, Madeline. “Diversity of Algae Slows Growth of Microcystis.” 2015. Web. 31 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Nolan M. Diversity of Algae Slows Growth of Microcystis. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Michigan; 2015. [cited 2020 May 31]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113075.

Council of Science Editors:

Nolan M. Diversity of Algae Slows Growth of Microcystis. [Masters Thesis]. University of Michigan; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113075

3. Rakowski, Chase. Effects of Algal Richness on Community Biomass and Stability Depend on Herbivory an Aquatic Microcosm Experiment.

Degree: MS, Natural Resources and Environment, 2015, University of Michigan

Hundreds of studies exploring how changing biodiversity alters ecosystem functioning have led to a consensus that higher diversity tends to both increase and stabilize community biomass through time. However, the majority of this work has focused on a single trophic level, even though trophic interactions also influence community biomass and stability. The relatively few studies investigating the effects of changing diversity on trophic interactions such as herbivory have produced mixed results; whether such effects are important for community biomass and stability is unclear. We performed an experiment using freshwater laboratory microcosms to test for effects of algal diversity (one or four species) on community biomass and temporal variability in the presence of two different herbivores (cladocerans Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia pulex). We measured algal biomass, herbivore density, and the variability of both measurements over four weeks. We also tested for effects of algal diversity on the strength of herbivory by comparing to a control treatment with no herbivores. The effects of algal diversity differed qualitatively between herbivore treatments. With no herbivores, algal biomass was greater and less variable in the high diversity treatment. Total herbivory by C. dubia did not differ between diversity treatments, preserving the qualitative effects of diversity on algal biomass and variability, and leading to only weak effects of diversity on the herbivore population. In contrast, total herbivory by D. pulex was twice as great in polycultures, leading to a larger and less variable population of D. pulex but lower and more variable algal biomass in polycultures versus monocultures. Thus a differential effect of algal diversity on herbivory led to opposite effects of diversity on algal biomass and variability. Our results suggest that trophic interactions lead to a richer array of diversity-function relationships than previously documented by studies that have focused on a single trophic level. Advisors/Committee Members: Cardinale, Brad (advisor), Allan, J. David (committee member), Duffy, Meghan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: biodiversity; herbivory; stability; algae

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rakowski, C. (2015). Effects of Algal Richness on Community Biomass and Stability Depend on Herbivory an Aquatic Microcosm Experiment. (Masters Thesis). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113077

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rakowski, Chase. “Effects of Algal Richness on Community Biomass and Stability Depend on Herbivory an Aquatic Microcosm Experiment.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Michigan. Accessed May 31, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113077.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rakowski, Chase. “Effects of Algal Richness on Community Biomass and Stability Depend on Herbivory an Aquatic Microcosm Experiment.” 2015. Web. 31 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Rakowski C. Effects of Algal Richness on Community Biomass and Stability Depend on Herbivory an Aquatic Microcosm Experiment. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Michigan; 2015. [cited 2020 May 31]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113077.

Council of Science Editors:

Rakowski C. Effects of Algal Richness on Community Biomass and Stability Depend on Herbivory an Aquatic Microcosm Experiment. [Masters Thesis]. University of Michigan; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/113077

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