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You searched for +publisher:"University of Michigan" +contributor:("Blumenthal, Susanna"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Michigan

1. Belt, Rabia Shahin. Mental Disability and the Right to Vote.

Degree: PhD, American Culture, 2015, University of Michigan

Nearly forty states disfranchise people based on their mental status. Despite the patchwork of laws limiting the voting rights of people with mental disabilities, one of America’s largest minority groups, few researchers have investigated the constitutional strategy utilized for disenfranchisement or the subsequent legal challenges that arose. Through a fine-grained analysis of constitutional and legislative debates, court cases, trade documents, newspapers, and petitions, from the beginning of these suffrage restrictions to the enactment of the 19th Amendment, I describe a “common sense” disability model – the methodology behind barring people with alleged mental disabilities from the franchise. I consider how and why state legislators prohibited individuals’ right to vote based on mental capacity in state statutes and constitutions. I show that two groups –African Americans, and women – were labeled as unfit for suffrage and full political citizenship because of their assumed mental deficiencies, and how each of these groups deployed their own definitions of mental capacity as they fought for the franchise. I then examine the subsequent court and congressional challenges involving people alleged to have voted despite their being judged to lack the necessary mental capacity. I conclude by reflecting on the changed landscape of the twentieth century, as statutory provisions such as the American with Disabilities Act and the Voting Rights Act, and political movements such as the disability rights movement challenged the exclusion of the disempowered from the franchise. Advisors/Committee Members: Deloria, Philip J (committee member), Pernick, Martin S (committee member), Lassiter, Matthew D (committee member), Scott, Rebecca J (committee member), Jones, Martha (committee member), Blumenthal, Susanna (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Disability; Law; African-American History; Citizenship; Voting/Suffrage; Women's History; African-American Studies; American and Canadian Studies; History (General); Humanities (General); Women's and Gender Studies; Humanities

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APA (6th Edition):

Belt, R. S. (2015). Mental Disability and the Right to Vote. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/116625

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Belt, Rabia Shahin. “Mental Disability and the Right to Vote.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/116625.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Belt, Rabia Shahin. “Mental Disability and the Right to Vote.” 2015. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Belt RS. Mental Disability and the Right to Vote. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/116625.

Council of Science Editors:

Belt RS. Mental Disability and the Right to Vote. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/116625

2. Bruner, Nicolette Isabel. Corporate Impersonation: The Possibilities of Personhood in American Literature, 1886-1917.

Degree: PhD, English Language and Literature, 2015, University of Michigan

This dissertation analyzes the ways in which certain U.S. novels of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century engaged with the problem of the corporation, a form of business organization that had become ascendant over nearly every aspect of modern life. In a moment when legal scholars were deepening and expanding the ancient doctrine of corporate personhood (which grants corporations the status of people under the law), novelists used literature to explore how the changing status of the corporation might generate new possibilities of personhood for other groups with tenuous legal status — most notably women, immigrants, and animals. Through close reading of novels by Upton Sinclair, Edith Wharton, Theodore Dreiser, Richard Harding Davis, and Frank Norris, this manuscript argues that popular novels in the turn of the twentieth century were as much a part of the debate over the nature of corporate personhood as more traditional legal texts such as law reviews and court opinions. For Sinclair, the Beef Trust’s grotesque exploitation of livestock and immigrant workers alike forces the protagonist to reclaim his humanity by joining a socialist collective — another form of group personhood. Likewise Norris’s The Octopus explores the problems and possibilities of direct action against corporate power. For other writers, however, the corporation was less a force of oppression than a vehicle for personal and political transformation. Dreiser’s Cowperwood, by creating his own corporate self, is able to achieve a different kind of financial and social potential, while in Wharton’s The Fruit of the Tree, the corporate structure enables the empowerment of its female shareholders — even as the corporation itself becomes naturalized into the familiar collectivities of the family and of “society” writ small. Indeed, Davis’s Soldiers of Fortune goes so far as to valorize the multinational corporation as integral to the financial and social promises of the U.S. imperialist project. Although corporate personhood is often lampooned today as an absurd symbol of oligarchy, the authors in this dissertation grappled with the more complicated problem of how the corporation was changing the nature of personhood itself, for better or worse. Advisors/Committee Members: Crane, Gregg David (committee member), Lyons, Scott Richard (committee member), Freedman, Jonathan E. (committee member), Blumenthal, Susanna (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: American Literature; Legal Personhood; Corporations; Law and Literature; Animal Studies; Business Fiction; Law and Legal Studies; English Language and Literature; Government Information and Law; Humanities

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bruner, N. I. (2015). Corporate Impersonation: The Possibilities of Personhood in American Literature, 1886-1917. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/111632

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bruner, Nicolette Isabel. “Corporate Impersonation: The Possibilities of Personhood in American Literature, 1886-1917.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/111632.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bruner, Nicolette Isabel. “Corporate Impersonation: The Possibilities of Personhood in American Literature, 1886-1917.” 2015. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bruner NI. Corporate Impersonation: The Possibilities of Personhood in American Literature, 1886-1917. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/111632.

Council of Science Editors:

Bruner NI. Corporate Impersonation: The Possibilities of Personhood in American Literature, 1886-1917. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/111632

3. Erman, Samuel C. Puerto Rico and the Promise of United States Citizenship: Struggles around Status in a New Empire, 1898-1917.

Degree: PhD, American Culture, 2010, University of Michigan

By invading and annexing Puerto Rico and other Spanish lands in 1898-1899, the United States took an imperial turn that unsettled its constitutional order. This dissertation traces responses by two groups—one within the U.S. government and another comprised of Puerto Ricans—to the legal uncertainty that reigned until Congress extended U.S. citizenship to “citizens of Porto Rico” in 1917. It also reconstructs the social and legal terrain surrounding key legal actions: the Treaty of Paris, the Foraker Act, the Insular Cases, and the Jones Act. For representatives of the U.S. government—federal judges, elected officials, and appointed administrators—U.S occupation of the island imposed hard choices between the exigencies of imperial governance and what they saw as adherence to constitutional norms. For a group of Puerto Ricans, mostly male politicians, competing federal actors and priorities provided openings to advance individual and collective claims to status. This study traces the political and legal activities of officials and claimants as well as the metaphors they drew upon to explain their claims. U.S. officials characteristically expressed fidelity to legal concepts, alleged Anglo-Saxon superiority, and contrasted their actions with Spanish imperial misrule. Rather than reject racial hierarchies in U.S. imperialist and eugenic thought, Puerto Rican actors often claimed favorable positions within those hierarchies through Reconstruction metaphors and self-affirming historical accounts of their Spanish-era political participation. Close study of Puerto Ricans who sought citizenship or self-government in this period, especially the unusual grouping of claimants involved in Gonzales v. Williams (1904), reveals that existing accounts of the Insular Cases overemphasize the coherence of these decisions. The oft-cited Downes v. Bidwell (1901), moreover, should be read alongside Gonzales. For two decades the Court declined to completely embrace the doctrinal innovations or delineate the implications for Puerto Rican rights of the Downes ruling. The Insular Cases developed slowly and ambiguously, transforming U.S. citizenship for Puerto Ricans from a status that courts might recognize in individual islanders and that might bring them full constitutional protections and eventual U.S. statehood, into a largely empty vessel, achievable only through Congress and heralding indefinite colonialism. Advisors/Committee Members: Hoffnung-Garskof, Jesse E. (committee member), Scott, Rebecca J. (committee member), Blumenthal, Susanna (committee member), Jones, Martha (committee member), Primus, Richard A. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Citizenship; Puerto Rico; Constitutional History; Insular Cases; American Political Development; Gonzales V. Williams; Law and Legal Studies; American and Canadian Studies; History (General); Latin American and Caribbean Studies; Government, Politics and Law; Humanities; Social Sciences

…possible myriad aspects of this project: the University of Michigan Program in American Culture… …the University of Michigan Law School, the Rackham Graduate School of the Univeristy of… …Michigan, the University of Michigan Institute for Research on Women and Gender, Clara Belfield… …the University of Michigan International Institute, and the U.S. Department of Education… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Erman, S. C. (2010). Puerto Rico and the Promise of United States Citizenship: Struggles around Status in a New Empire, 1898-1917. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/75920

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Erman, Samuel C. “Puerto Rico and the Promise of United States Citizenship: Struggles around Status in a New Empire, 1898-1917.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/75920.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Erman, Samuel C. “Puerto Rico and the Promise of United States Citizenship: Struggles around Status in a New Empire, 1898-1917.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Erman SC. Puerto Rico and the Promise of United States Citizenship: Struggles around Status in a New Empire, 1898-1917. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/75920.

Council of Science Editors:

Erman SC. Puerto Rico and the Promise of United States Citizenship: Struggles around Status in a New Empire, 1898-1917. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/75920

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