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You searched for +publisher:"University of Miami" +contributor:("Wesley Smith"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Miami

1. Alan, Ozgur. A Comparison of Two Different Types of High Intensity Interval Training on Cardiometabolic Health in Overweight/Obese Women.

Degree: PhD, Kinesiology and Sport Sciences (Education), 2018, University of Miami

The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of aerobic high intensity interval training (A-HIIT) and resistance-high intensity interval training (R-HIIT) to that of a control group (CON) on physical characteristics, cardiometabolic health, and self-reported well-being. A total of 48 overweight/obese women met the criteria for possessing one or more metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors and were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Following eight weeks of training, a total of 31 women completed the intervention and were included in the statistical analysis: A-HIIT (n=10), R-HIIT (n=10), and CON (n=11). Both experimental groups trained three times a week for 25 minutes throughout the eight-week protocol. Both A-HIIT and R-HIIT groups improved aerobic fitness compared to CON (p=0.029 for both groups). Only R-HIIT group showed increases in upper body power over CON (p=0.002). R-HIIT group also showed statistically significant reductions in fasting insulin levels (p=0.036) and insulin resistance (p=0.046) compared to CON. Furthermore, β-cell function scores were lower in R-HIIT compared to CON (p=0.017) and A-HIIT (p=0.002) groups. R-HIIT also had significantly higher scores on the physical function domain of Patient Reported Outcome Measurement System (PROMIS®)-57 well-being questionnaire compared to the CON group (p=0.035). Our study showed that R-HIIT can be considered as part of an optimal worksite-wellness strategy for improving physical characteristics, cardiometabolic health, and well-being in women at risk for or possessing MetS seeking an expeditious form of training. Advisors/Committee Members: Arlette Perry, Kevin Jacobs, Wesley Smith, Soyeon Ahn.

Subjects/Keywords: High intensity interval training; resistance training; insulin resistance; cardiometabolic; obese; worksite wellness

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Alan, O. (2018). A Comparison of Two Different Types of High Intensity Interval Training on Cardiometabolic Health in Overweight/Obese Women. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Miami. Retrieved from https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/2159

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Alan, Ozgur. “A Comparison of Two Different Types of High Intensity Interval Training on Cardiometabolic Health in Overweight/Obese Women.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Miami. Accessed December 13, 2019. https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/2159.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Alan, Ozgur. “A Comparison of Two Different Types of High Intensity Interval Training on Cardiometabolic Health in Overweight/Obese Women.” 2018. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Alan O. A Comparison of Two Different Types of High Intensity Interval Training on Cardiometabolic Health in Overweight/Obese Women. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Miami; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/2159.

Council of Science Editors:

Alan O. A Comparison of Two Different Types of High Intensity Interval Training on Cardiometabolic Health in Overweight/Obese Women. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Miami; 2018. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/2159


University of Miami

2. Flanagan, Emily White. Endogenous and Exogenous Estrogens on Biochemical and Performance Indicators of Exercise Induced Muscle Damage in Users and non-Users of Oral Contraceptives.

Degree: PhD, Kinesiology and Sport Sciences (Education), 2019, University of Miami

It has been proposed that endogenous estrogens may protect skeletal muscle integrity and promote the repair and recovery process after acute muscle damage. The purpose of this study was to examine both biochemical and performance indices of exercise-induced muscle damage (EiMD) across menstrual cycle phases and compare oral contraceptive pill users (OCP) and eumenorrheic non-users (EUC). A total of 12 women (5 EUC; 7 OCP) underwent a prolonged eccentric running EiMD protocol and were evaluated for biochemical markers of skeletal muscle damage including creatine kinase (CK), C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and myoglobin (MgB) as well as performance markers including strength, range of motion (ROM), soreness perception, and swelling during early follicular (EF), late follicular (LF), and luteal (LU) phases. Measurements were taken pre- and post-exercise and at 24, 48, and 72 h post exercise. No differences were observed in ROM, swelling, or pain perception in response to EiMD across menstrual cycle phases. The EUC and OCP groups showed similar increases in CK, MgB, and soreness perception in response to EiMD across menstrual cycle phases. Strength recovery differed across menstrual cycle phases and between the EUC and OCP groups (p=0.011), being optimal in phases with higher endogenous estrogen levels (LF and LU). We conclude that endogenous estrogens produced during the natural menstrual cycle may support improved strength recovery, despite immediate increases in muscle cell damage, regardless of oral contraceptive pill use. Advisors/Committee Members: Arlette Perry, Wesley Smith, Kevin Jacobs, Soyeon Ahn.

Subjects/Keywords: skeletal muscle; estrogen; women's health; exercise induced muscle damage; exercise

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Flanagan, E. W. (2019). Endogenous and Exogenous Estrogens on Biochemical and Performance Indicators of Exercise Induced Muscle Damage in Users and non-Users of Oral Contraceptives. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Miami. Retrieved from https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/2296

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Flanagan, Emily White. “Endogenous and Exogenous Estrogens on Biochemical and Performance Indicators of Exercise Induced Muscle Damage in Users and non-Users of Oral Contraceptives.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Miami. Accessed December 13, 2019. https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/2296.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Flanagan, Emily White. “Endogenous and Exogenous Estrogens on Biochemical and Performance Indicators of Exercise Induced Muscle Damage in Users and non-Users of Oral Contraceptives.” 2019. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Flanagan EW. Endogenous and Exogenous Estrogens on Biochemical and Performance Indicators of Exercise Induced Muscle Damage in Users and non-Users of Oral Contraceptives. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Miami; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/2296.

Council of Science Editors:

Flanagan EW. Endogenous and Exogenous Estrogens on Biochemical and Performance Indicators of Exercise Induced Muscle Damage in Users and non-Users of Oral Contraceptives. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Miami; 2019. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/2296


University of Miami

3. Edwards, David A. ADL-Specific Versus Standard Aquatic Exercise in Older Persons.

Degree: PhD, Kinesiology and Sport Sciences (Education), 2011, University of Miami

With aging there is a decrease in a person’s ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) which may be most effectively addressed using training patterns that are biomechanically similar to ADL. Since aquatic exercise offers the opportunity to provide resistance with a high level of safety, the pool may afford the ideal environment for ADL-specific training in an aging population. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to compare a traditional aquatic exercise program (TRAD) to an aquatic program tailored to target ADL (ADLspec). Methods: Eighteen independently living individuals (68.7 + 7.5 years) were randomly assigned to a TRAD or ADLspec aquatic exercise group. The exercise groups attended 1 hr exercise sessions, 2 times per week for 8 weeks. ADL ability was assessed using the short version of the Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance Test (PFP-10); while strength and power were assessed using the 30s arm curl and 30 sec. chair stand tests. Results: Mixed design ANOVAs revealed a significant group x time interaction for floor sweep time with the ADLspec group outperforming the TRAD and control (CON) groups (p = .043). Additionally, the ADLspec group improved the pan weight and scarf time components of the PFP-10 (p < .020), while the TRAD group improved pan time and laundry time (p < .046). Both training groups showed similar improvements for jacket time, grocery weight, and 6-min walk, (p < .046). The ADLspec and TRAD groups also made similar improvements in upper and lower body strength, as well as lower body power across time, (p < .043). A student’s t-test revealed the TRAD group spent more time exercising during the hour session than the ADLspec group (p < .05). Conclusion: The results indicate that performing an ADLspec aquatic exercise program can increase performance of ADL that require more complex sequential movements; however, ADL more dependent on fitness may be better addressed using a TRAD intervention. These results can be helpful when designing a periodized aquatic training program to increase independence in older persons. Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph F. Signorile, Arlette Perry, Wesley Smith, Bernard A. Roos.

Subjects/Keywords: elderly; activities of daily living; aquatic; exercise; biomechanical specificity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Edwards, D. A. (2011). ADL-Specific Versus Standard Aquatic Exercise in Older Persons. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Miami. Retrieved from https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/588

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Edwards, David A. “ADL-Specific Versus Standard Aquatic Exercise in Older Persons.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Miami. Accessed December 13, 2019. https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/588.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Edwards, David A. “ADL-Specific Versus Standard Aquatic Exercise in Older Persons.” 2011. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Edwards DA. ADL-Specific Versus Standard Aquatic Exercise in Older Persons. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Miami; 2011. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/588.

Council of Science Editors:

Edwards DA. ADL-Specific Versus Standard Aquatic Exercise in Older Persons. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Miami; 2011. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/588

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