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You searched for +publisher:"University of Miami" +contributor:("John Soliday"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Miami

1. Browning, David Eric. Dark Façades: Gender and the Films of Stanley Kubrick.

Degree: MA, Communication Studies (Communication), 2013, University of Miami

The work of iconic film director Stanley Kubrick is generally studied in terms of visual style and its reliance on male protagonists. Looking past the traditional focal points, one is able to examine the truly fascinating female protagonists that inhabit these dark worlds. By uncovering three distinct types of women included in the filmography of Stanley Kubrick: the instigator, the victim, and the empowered, I have reasoned that the director evolved alongside these female characters as his career advanced. Focusing on the instigating nature of the women in his early films, I have showcased how these individuals held powerful grips over the men in their lives, leading to violent outcomes. The victims in Kubrick’s work reside primarily in the mid-portion of his career, and are shown as reactionary examples of femininity in response to an overpowering androcentric world. Finally, the empowered Alice in Eyes Wide Shut showcases Kubrick’s evolution by featuring a woman with agency, who is not reactionary in any way. Alice is capable of making her own decisions based on her own desires and need for change. The evolution of Kubrick as a director can be traced alongside the transformation of his female characters, highlighting the true importance of these individuals in seemingly male driven works. Advisors/Committee Members: Christina Lane, William Rothman, John Soliday.

Subjects/Keywords: Stanley Kubrick; Gender; Nicole Kidman; Feminist Theory; Eyes Wide Shut

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Browning, D. E. (2013). Dark Façades: Gender and the Films of Stanley Kubrick. (Thesis). University of Miami. Retrieved from https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_theses/423

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Browning, David Eric. “Dark Façades: Gender and the Films of Stanley Kubrick.” 2013. Thesis, University of Miami. Accessed June 25, 2019. https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_theses/423.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Browning, David Eric. “Dark Façades: Gender and the Films of Stanley Kubrick.” 2013. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Browning DE. Dark Façades: Gender and the Films of Stanley Kubrick. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Miami; 2013. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_theses/423.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Browning DE. Dark Façades: Gender and the Films of Stanley Kubrick. [Thesis]. University of Miami; 2013. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_theses/423

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Miami

2. Tatum, Maryann E. Digital Storytelling as a Cultural-Historical Activity: Effects on Information Text Comprehension.

Degree: PhD, Teaching and Learning (Education), 2009, University of Miami

New literacies in reading research demand for the study of comprehension skills using multiple modalities, through a more complex, multi-platform view of reading. Taking into account the robust roll of technology in our daily lives, research suggests that educators need activities to connect students' lack of reading skills with their growing multimodal literacy. During the post-reading phase of a directed reading activity (DRA), students were engaged in digital storytelling, where they created digital videos and slideshows based on information text read during DRA. Previous studies highlighting the use of digital storytelling have been limited to narrative formats and the influence that participation in this activity has on self-esteem and identity. This activity has been widely recommended for improving writing among teachers and in teaching journals, but it has not been empirically studied in the classroom as a comprehension activity. The theoretical framework that supported this study was Vygotsky's Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT). The researcher used the CHAT framework and Burke's Pentad of Analysis (1969) to study the nature of student interactions. Research questions for this study were answered through both quantitative and qualitative methods. The questions being asked by the researcher were: 1.What were the effects of participation in directed reading activity (DRA) modified to include digital storytelling in the post-reading phase of DRA on 6th graders' comprehension of information text? 2. Did the interactions observed during participation in directed reading activity modified to include digital storytelling reflect the principles promoted by Cultural-Historical Activity Theory? Eighty sixth-grade students were randomly assigned to their digital storytelling groups. The subjects participated in whole-class DRA on two information texts, with the treatment group creating digital stories based on the texts. Cloze scores indicated that there was no significant difference in comprehension due to the treatment. However, there was ample evidence to support the claim that participation in digital storytelling instantiates the principles of CHAT. Overall, digital storytelling does show promise as a multimodal instructional activity, and the discussion expands to several implications and recommendations of future research on this instructional activity. Advisors/Committee Members: William Blanton - Committee Chair, Eugene Provenzo - Committee Member, Shawn Post - Committee Member, John Soliday - Outside Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: Directed Reading Activity; Literacy; Reading; Education; Multiplatform; Multimodal; Reading Lesson

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tatum, M. E. (2009). Digital Storytelling as a Cultural-Historical Activity: Effects on Information Text Comprehension. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Miami. Retrieved from https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/222

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tatum, Maryann E. “Digital Storytelling as a Cultural-Historical Activity: Effects on Information Text Comprehension.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Miami. Accessed June 25, 2019. https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/222.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tatum, Maryann E. “Digital Storytelling as a Cultural-Historical Activity: Effects on Information Text Comprehension.” 2009. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Tatum ME. Digital Storytelling as a Cultural-Historical Activity: Effects on Information Text Comprehension. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Miami; 2009. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/222.

Council of Science Editors:

Tatum ME. Digital Storytelling as a Cultural-Historical Activity: Effects on Information Text Comprehension. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Miami; 2009. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/222

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