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You searched for +publisher:"University of Manitoba" +contributor:("Watt, David"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Manitoba

1. Stewart, Ryan. Diction in the description of dragons in Icelandic texts from c. 871 1600.

Degree: Icelandic, 2019, University of Manitoba

This thesis investigates the physical appearance of dragons as they appear in medieval Icelandic texts. I collected examples of descriptive diction from Icelandic texts to construct a pool of possible dragon descriptors. This pool, along with contemporaneous art, allowed me to construct a timeline of features that helped me evaluate common descriptions and to determine which terms correlated with others. The variety of terms collected present the Icelandic dragon as a chimeric entity, a being comprised from the anatomy of various creatures, including worms and serpents, fish and whales, as well as birds. When these features are consolidated, the Icelandic dragon as a whole functions as a symbol of domination that arises from a powerful and synergistic array of donor animals. Overall, this thesis shows that some previous translations and interpretations of the features of Icelandic dragons were misleading or incomplete. Correcting these translations and interpretations will not only help us to see the Icelandic dragon more clearly but will also help correct our understanding of their place in the global taxonomy of dragons. Advisors/Committee Members: Watt, David (English, Theatre, Film & Media) (supervisor), Bugslag, James (Art) (examiningcommittee), Bugslag, James (Fine Arts) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: Iceland; Dragon

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APA (6th Edition):

Stewart, R. (2019). Diction in the description of dragons in Icelandic texts from c. 871 1600. (Masters Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34293

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stewart, Ryan. “Diction in the description of dragons in Icelandic texts from c. 871 1600.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34293.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stewart, Ryan. “Diction in the description of dragons in Icelandic texts from c. 871 1600.” 2019. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Stewart R. Diction in the description of dragons in Icelandic texts from c. 871 1600. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34293.

Council of Science Editors:

Stewart R. Diction in the description of dragons in Icelandic texts from c. 871 1600. [Masters Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34293


University of Manitoba

2. Kizilgüneşler, Ilgin. Newspeak and new media: contemporary Orwell in interactive environments.

Degree: English, Film, and Theatre, 2018, University of Manitoba

Almost seventy years after its publication, George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, a canonical work of twentieth-century British literature, preserves its relevance not only in relation to politics, but also in relation to its portrayal of the boundaries of the individual in an authoritarian state. Drawing on theories in new media scholarship, and building on existing literary analyses of Nineteen Eighty-Four, this thesis examines Orwell’s last novel through the lens of digital culture. It focuses on the connections between the effects of Newspeak –the language created by Orwell in the novel –and interactive environments. In so doing, it aims to revive the core ideas that exist in Orwell’s story and analyze their significance for new media. Advisors/Committee Members: Warne, Vanessa (English, Theatre, Film & Media) (supervisor), Watt, David (English, Theatre, Film & Media) (examiningcommittee), Bak, Greg (History) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: Orwellian; Newspeak; New Media; Surveillance

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kizilgüneşler, I. (2018). Newspeak and new media: contemporary Orwell in interactive environments. (Masters Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33205

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kizilgüneşler, Ilgin. “Newspeak and new media: contemporary Orwell in interactive environments.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33205.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kizilgüneşler, Ilgin. “Newspeak and new media: contemporary Orwell in interactive environments.” 2018. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Kizilgüneşler I. Newspeak and new media: contemporary Orwell in interactive environments. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33205.

Council of Science Editors:

Kizilgüneşler I. Newspeak and new media: contemporary Orwell in interactive environments. [Masters Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33205


University of Manitoba

3. Burt, Cameron Bryce. Early modern editors and the value of middle english literature.

Degree: English, Film, and Theatre, 2019, University of Manitoba

My dissertation, “Early Modern Editors and the Value of Middle English Literature,” examines the emergence of editorial figures in sixteenth-century editions of Sir Isumbras, Robert Henryson’s Fables, John Lydgate’s Serpent of Division, and Geoffrey Chaucer’s poetry. My study argues that the increasing alterity of Middle English texts in the early modern period compelled editorial interventions designed to make the texts accessible as well as to identify, to emphasize, or to establish the texts’ relevance to contemporary audiences. Early editors managed and controlled the contents and appearance of the books in which the older literary texts appeared in order to redefine their value and purpose for a new audience. They accomplished this with practices such as editing the primary text, collecting or contributing paratext, selecting or designing codicological features, as well as through methods I have termed “codicological translation,” “gathering and framing,” and “selective copying and purposeful omission.” By comparing what these editors say they are doing in their prefatory writings to the results of their editorial contributions, my methodology allows me to determine what these early editors believed themselves to be doing, why, and in what context. These insights have significant implications for the study of both early modern book history and literature. Specifically, they contribute to developing academic conversations among critics like Stephanie Trigg, Tim William Machan, and A.E.B. Coldiron concerning the influence and authority of editors and craftspeople in the production of early modern books. Advisors/Committee Members: Watt, David (English, Theatre, Film and Media) (supervisor), Owens, Judith (English, Theatre, Film and Media) (examiningcommittee), Cossar, Roisin (History) (examiningcommittee), McGillivray, Murray (University of Calgary) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: Middle english literature; Early modern book history; Codicology; Textual Criticism; Editors

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burt, C. B. (2019). Early modern editors and the value of middle english literature. (Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33853

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burt, Cameron Bryce. “Early modern editors and the value of middle english literature.” 2019. Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33853.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burt, Cameron Bryce. “Early modern editors and the value of middle english literature.” 2019. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Burt CB. Early modern editors and the value of middle english literature. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33853.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Burt CB. Early modern editors and the value of middle english literature. [Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33853

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.