Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Manitoba" +contributor:("Watt, David (English, Theatre, Film and Media)"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Manitoba

1. Nickerson, Warren Thor. Teachers’ perspectives on planning for conceptual understanding in English language arts.

Degree: Education, 2017, University of Manitoba

This study explored the conceptual ideas of secondary English language arts (ELA) teachers when they planned backwards. ELA curricula in Western Canada had largely been framed as a set of literate processes and strategies, but some literacy research and ELA curricula have included a growing emphasis on conceptual understanding. This study examined the inclusion of concepts or “big ideas” among teachers who explicitly used backwards planning. The researcher interviewed eleven secondary (i.e., grades 7 -12) ELA teachers to explore the conceptual understanding embedded in their learning designs and to find out whether their experiences with backward planning were helpful. The participants were purposefully sampled from a variety of settings – from public and private schools, from integrated to stand-alone courses, from three Canadian provinces and one American state. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach (Charmaz, 2006), the interview transcripts and related artifacts from these varied settings were analyzed, coded, and themed. The analysis and interpretation of the transcripts and extant documents revealed the nature of goals, assessment practices, instructional strategies, and resources. One theme that emerged from analysis was that the concepts ELA teachers conceived for their unit plans varied in their source. Some ideas were derived from themes in texts, some concepts explored the artistry and craft within texts of various genre, and a third category of ideas went beyond texts to think critically and reflexively. The teachers’ interviews and planning documents also reflected the ways that they positioned texts in their courses: as a central object of study, as a marquee or headliner for a key idea, or simply as catalysts for students’ own lines of inquiry. In addition to the nature of learning designs, the study also examined the experience of planning backwards with conceptual understanding in mind. Participants contended backward planning brought a sense of clarity, purposefulness, connectedness, and relevance to teaching and learning. Participants used innovative pedagogy, embedded formative assessment, developed authentic summative evaluation and offered student choice. Also, participants shared ideas about planning collaboratively, identifying necessary conditions for successful collaborative planning (flexibility, time, expertise, leadership, and norms and protocols for collaboration). The dissertation concludes with ideas for further research. Advisors/Committee Members: Straw, Stanley (Education) Lutfiyya, Zana (Education) (supervisor), Smith, Karen E. (Education) (examiningcommittee), Honeyford, Michelle (Education) (examiningcommittee), Watt, David (English, Theatre, Film and Media) (examiningcommittee), Phillips, Linda (University of Alberta) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: English language arts; Curriculum planning; Backwards planning; Curriculum design; Conceptual understanding; Teacher planning; Constructivist grounded theory

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nickerson, W. T. (2017). Teachers’ perspectives on planning for conceptual understanding in English language arts. (Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33002

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nickerson, Warren Thor. “Teachers’ perspectives on planning for conceptual understanding in English language arts.” 2017. Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed February 22, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33002.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nickerson, Warren Thor. “Teachers’ perspectives on planning for conceptual understanding in English language arts.” 2017. Web. 22 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Nickerson WT. Teachers’ perspectives on planning for conceptual understanding in English language arts. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2017. [cited 2020 Feb 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33002.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Nickerson WT. Teachers’ perspectives on planning for conceptual understanding in English language arts. [Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33002

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Manitoba

2. Burt, Cameron Bryce. Early modern editors and the value of middle english literature.

Degree: English, Film, and Theatre, 2019, University of Manitoba

My dissertation, “Early Modern Editors and the Value of Middle English Literature,” examines the emergence of editorial figures in sixteenth-century editions of Sir Isumbras, Robert Henryson’s Fables, John Lydgate’s Serpent of Division, and Geoffrey Chaucer’s poetry. My study argues that the increasing alterity of Middle English texts in the early modern period compelled editorial interventions designed to make the texts accessible as well as to identify, to emphasize, or to establish the texts’ relevance to contemporary audiences. Early editors managed and controlled the contents and appearance of the books in which the older literary texts appeared in order to redefine their value and purpose for a new audience. They accomplished this with practices such as editing the primary text, collecting or contributing paratext, selecting or designing codicological features, as well as through methods I have termed “codicological translation,” “gathering and framing,” and “selective copying and purposeful omission.” By comparing what these editors say they are doing in their prefatory writings to the results of their editorial contributions, my methodology allows me to determine what these early editors believed themselves to be doing, why, and in what context. These insights have significant implications for the study of both early modern book history and literature. Specifically, they contribute to developing academic conversations among critics like Stephanie Trigg, Tim William Machan, and A.E.B. Coldiron concerning the influence and authority of editors and craftspeople in the production of early modern books. Advisors/Committee Members: Watt, David (English, Theatre, Film and Media) (supervisor), Owens, Judith (English, Theatre, Film and Media) (examiningcommittee), Cossar, Roisin (History) (examiningcommittee), McGillivray, Murray (University of Calgary) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: Middle english literature; Early modern book history; Codicology; Textual Criticism; Editors

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burt, C. B. (2019). Early modern editors and the value of middle english literature. (Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33853

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burt, Cameron Bryce. “Early modern editors and the value of middle english literature.” 2019. Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed February 22, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33853.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burt, Cameron Bryce. “Early modern editors and the value of middle english literature.” 2019. Web. 22 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Burt CB. Early modern editors and the value of middle english literature. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2019. [cited 2020 Feb 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33853.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Burt CB. Early modern editors and the value of middle english literature. [Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33853

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.