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You searched for +publisher:"University of Manitoba" +contributor:("Scuse, David (Computer Science) McNeill, Dean (Electrical and Computer Engineering)"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Gunn, Tyler. Dynamic heterogeneous team formation for robotic urban search and rescue.

Degree: Computer Science, 2012, University of Manitoba

I developed a framework to support the maintenance of teams of heterogeneous robots operating in complex and dynamic environments such as disaster zones. Given an established team, my work also facilitates the discovery of work to be done during the team's mission and its subsequent assignment to members of the team in a distributed fashion. I evaluated my framework through the development of an example implementation where robots perform exploration in order to locate victims in a simulated disaster environment. Advisors/Committee Members: Anderson, John (Computer Science) (supervisor), Scuse, David (Computer Science) McNeill, Dean (Electrical and Computer Engineering) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: agent; team; role; AI; USAR

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APA (6th Edition):

Gunn, T. (2012). Dynamic heterogeneous team formation for robotic urban search and rescue. (Masters Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/5217

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gunn, Tyler. “Dynamic heterogeneous team formation for robotic urban search and rescue.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed April 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/5217.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gunn, Tyler. “Dynamic heterogeneous team formation for robotic urban search and rescue.” 2012. Web. 23 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Gunn T. Dynamic heterogeneous team formation for robotic urban search and rescue. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/5217.

Council of Science Editors:

Gunn T. Dynamic heterogeneous team formation for robotic urban search and rescue. [Masters Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/5217

2. de Denus, Michael Andrew Rolland. Adaptive Formation Control for Heterogeneous Robots With Limited Information.

Degree: Computer Science, 2013, University of Manitoba

In many robotics tasks, it is advantageous for robots to assemble into formations. In many of these applications, it is useful for the robots to have differing capabilities (i.e., be heterogeneous). These differences are task specific, but the most obvious differences lie in sensing and locomotion capabilities. Groups of robots may also have only imperfect or partially-known information about one another as well. One key piece of information that robots lack is how many other robots are in the environment. This thesis describes a method for formation control that allows heterogeneous robots with limited information to dynamically assemble into formations, merge smaller formations together, and correct errors that may arise in the formation. The approach is shown to be scalable and robust against robot failure, and is evaluated in multiple simulated environments. Advisors/Committee Members: Anderson, John ( Computer Science ) (supervisor), Scuse, David ( Computer Science ) McNeill, Dean ( Electrical and Computer Engineering ) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: Artificial Intelligence; Robotics; Formation; Heterogeneity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

de Denus, M. A. R. (2013). Adaptive Formation Control for Heterogeneous Robots With Limited Information. (Masters Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/18331

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

de Denus, Michael Andrew Rolland. “Adaptive Formation Control for Heterogeneous Robots With Limited Information.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed April 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/18331.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

de Denus, Michael Andrew Rolland. “Adaptive Formation Control for Heterogeneous Robots With Limited Information.” 2013. Web. 23 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

de Denus MAR. Adaptive Formation Control for Heterogeneous Robots With Limited Information. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/18331.

Council of Science Editors:

de Denus MAR. Adaptive Formation Control for Heterogeneous Robots With Limited Information. [Masters Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/18331


University of Manitoba

3. Fiawoo, Seth. Independent activity and local opportunity for dynamic robot team management in dangerous domains.

Degree: Computer Science, 2019, University of Manitoba

Dangerous domains are a challenge for teams of heterogeneous robots, since robot losses may involve the loss of particular skills that might be rare in the domain. Previous research has resulted in a framework that allows teams to rebalance and recruit from the environment. However, there is currently no consideration of situations where agents may at times provide more useful work globally by not joining a team, or situations where it might be discovered that types of work might be associated with a given locality. My thesis extends this framework to give agents the ability to refuse to join teams and work for times on their own, by considering current satisfaction in the use of their skills, the likely rarity of their skills, and the distribution of places those skills are used in the environment. I examine this work in a simulated Urban Search and Rescue domain. My results show that in scenarios where a robot’s special skills are rare and tasks requiring those skills are only available at a few fixed locations in the environment, a robot is more useful if it suspends its team commitment to make itself available to all teams. Advisors/Committee Members: Anderson, John (Computer Science) (supervisor), Scuse, David (Computer Science) McNeill, Dean (Electrical and Computer Engineering) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: Robotics; Multi-Robot Systems; Urban Search and Rescue; Heterogeneous Robot Teams; Robot Satisfaction; Rare Skills; Recruitment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fiawoo, S. (2019). Independent activity and local opportunity for dynamic robot team management in dangerous domains. (Masters Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34202

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fiawoo, Seth. “Independent activity and local opportunity for dynamic robot team management in dangerous domains.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed April 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34202.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fiawoo, Seth. “Independent activity and local opportunity for dynamic robot team management in dangerous domains.” 2019. Web. 23 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Fiawoo S. Independent activity and local opportunity for dynamic robot team management in dangerous domains. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34202.

Council of Science Editors:

Fiawoo S. Independent activity and local opportunity for dynamic robot team management in dangerous domains. [Masters Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34202

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