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You searched for +publisher:"University of Manitoba" +contributor:("Moola, Fiona (Kinesiology and Recreation Management) Bailis, Daniel (Psychology)"). One record found.

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1. Meade, Laura. Is there positive in the negative? Understanding the role of guilt and shame in physical activity self-regulation.

Degree: Kinesiology and Recreation Management, 2014, University of Manitoba

According to Cybernetic Control theories, negative emotions result when goal progress is thwarted and these emotions facilitate behavioural regulation (Carver & Scheier, 1998). Self-conscious emotions are recognized for their self-regulatory functions with guilt and shame being especially central to governing unhealthy behavior change (Dijkstra & Buunk, 2008). However limited research has explored the role of self-conscious emotions and exercise. In light of the concern about low physical activity rates among Canadians (Canadian Community Health Measures Survey, 2011) examining the role of guilt and shame in the self-regulation of exercise is warranted. Purpose. To examine the nature of guilt and shame related to recent exercise behavior. Procedures. In this online, observational study, 128 women and 47 men aged 18-64 (mean age 36, SD = 12.74) completed measures of recent physical activity, trait shame and guilt, exercise identity and demographics at baseline. On both a day when they did and did not engage in intended exercise, participants completed measures of recent exercise quantity and quality, exercise-related state shame and guilt, attributions (on the missed exercise day) and exercise intentions. Results. T-tests revealed that participants experienced more guilt and shame after a missed as opposed to an engaged-in intended exercise session, and that of these two emotions guilt was felt more intensely. Regression analyses determined that perceptions of exercise quality were negatively related to both guilt and shame, however these emotions were not related to exercise intentions. Guilt was associated with the attribution dimension of internal locus of casualty and shame with stability, but no relationships were found between the two emotions and exercise identity. Lastly, logistic regressions showed that shame, but not guilt, was associated with exercise behaviour with shame showing a negative relationship with behaviour. Findings add to the extant literature on the role of shame and guilt in exercise self-regulation. Advisors/Committee Members: Strachan, Shaelyn (Kinesiology and Recreation Management) (supervisor), Moola, Fiona (Kinesiology and Recreation Management) Bailis, Daniel (Psychology) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: Guilt; Physical Activity; Shame; Self-Regulation; Self-conscious emotions

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Meade, L. (2014). Is there positive in the negative? Understanding the role of guilt and shame in physical activity self-regulation. (Masters Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/23859

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Meade, Laura. “Is there positive in the negative? Understanding the role of guilt and shame in physical activity self-regulation.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/23859.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Meade, Laura. “Is there positive in the negative? Understanding the role of guilt and shame in physical activity self-regulation.” 2014. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Meade L. Is there positive in the negative? Understanding the role of guilt and shame in physical activity self-regulation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/23859.

Council of Science Editors:

Meade L. Is there positive in the negative? Understanding the role of guilt and shame in physical activity self-regulation. [Masters Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/23859

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