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You searched for +publisher:"University of Manitoba" +contributor:("Loewen, Royden (University of Winnipeg)"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Manitoba

1. Krahn, Elizabeth. An autoethnographic study of the legacies of collective trauma experienced by Russian Mennonite women who immigrated to Canada after WWII: implications on aging and the next generation.

Degree: Social Work, 2011, University of Manitoba

This thesis explores lifespan and intergenerational trauma effects experienced by Russian Mennonite women who fled from Stalinist Russia during WWII and migrated to Canada, and adult sons or daughters of this generation of women. As an adult child of survivors, I employed an autoethnographic methodology, conducting 1-on-1 interviews with eight women aged 78 to 96, and seven adult children aged 50 to 68. Older women demonstrated a lifelong emphasis on mental strength, faith, and resilience; the marginalization of emotions; evidence of insecure attachment styles; and potential for unresolved trauma to resurface in later life. The majority of adult children experienced attachment and identity issues; their life experiences are viewed through the lens of biological, psychological, familial, cultural (religious) transmission of trauma effects. Results highlight the importance of structural and narrative social work approaches that externalize and contextualize trauma and transform service environments that individualize and/or pathologize lifespan outcomes of trauma. Advisors/Committee Members: Cheung, Maria (Social Work) (supervisor), Heinonen, Tuula (Social Work) Loewen, Royden (University of Winnipeg) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: Life course approach; Critical gerontology; Collective trauma; Migration; Russian Mennonite women; Mental health; Lifespan trauma effects; Intergenerational trauma transmission; Insecure attachment; Narrative approaches; Externalizing and contextualizing trauma; Structural social work

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Krahn, E. (2011). An autoethnographic study of the legacies of collective trauma experienced by Russian Mennonite women who immigrated to Canada after WWII: implications on aging and the next generation. (Masters Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4821

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Krahn, Elizabeth. “An autoethnographic study of the legacies of collective trauma experienced by Russian Mennonite women who immigrated to Canada after WWII: implications on aging and the next generation.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed January 27, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4821.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Krahn, Elizabeth. “An autoethnographic study of the legacies of collective trauma experienced by Russian Mennonite women who immigrated to Canada after WWII: implications on aging and the next generation.” 2011. Web. 27 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Krahn E. An autoethnographic study of the legacies of collective trauma experienced by Russian Mennonite women who immigrated to Canada after WWII: implications on aging and the next generation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2011. [cited 2021 Jan 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4821.

Council of Science Editors:

Krahn E. An autoethnographic study of the legacies of collective trauma experienced by Russian Mennonite women who immigrated to Canada after WWII: implications on aging and the next generation. [Masters Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4821


University of Manitoba

2. Kaur, Preeti. Microfilm in the archives: past use, present sustainability and future transformation.

Degree: History, 2019, University of Manitoba

Up to the middle of the twentieth century, microfilm was a cutting-edge recordkeeping technology, much like digital technologies today. Commercial use of this technology changed the face of recordkeeping, ultimately affecting archival practice as well. The use of microfilm by archives has brought losses and gains in terms of materiality, access and preservation. Microfilmed records of the Department of the Interior demonstrate the importance of information being held in this particular medium, as these reels communicate the history of the dispossession of Indigenous communities, and the lack of Indigenous perspectives in the management of the records and the telling of their own story. Understanding the histories of recordkeeping practices of records containing Indigenous experiences allows archivists to update archival theory and practice to include Indigenous perspectives and decolonize records about the colonization of the West, which is achieved through the incorporation of Indigenous memory traditions into the records, and by digitizing the records and reordering them to reflect Indigenous perspectives. Records microfilmed in the early and mid-twentieth century are now prime candidates for digitization, a tool being used for preservation and access. Microfilm digitization projects, such as The Alberta Land Settlement Infrastructure Project and Canadiana Online are creating a new foundation to preserve records of the past and those being created now and in the future. This thesis will link microfilm’s past with its future, while discussing its current status in archives in relation to archival theory and practice. Advisors/Committee Members: Bak, Greg (History) (supervisor), Eyford, Ryan (University of Winnipeg) (examiningcommittee), Loewen, Royden (University of Winnipeg) (examiningcommittee), Rekrut, Ala (Archives of Manitoba) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: Microfilm

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kaur, P. (2019). Microfilm in the archives: past use, present sustainability and future transformation. (Masters Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34238

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kaur, Preeti. “Microfilm in the archives: past use, present sustainability and future transformation.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed January 27, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34238.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kaur, Preeti. “Microfilm in the archives: past use, present sustainability and future transformation.” 2019. Web. 27 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Kaur P. Microfilm in the archives: past use, present sustainability and future transformation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34238.

Council of Science Editors:

Kaur P. Microfilm in the archives: past use, present sustainability and future transformation. [Masters Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34238

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