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You searched for +publisher:"University of Manchester" +contributor:("WONG, CECILIA YLC"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Manchester

1. Zhang, Yi. Urban Street Design in Modern China: Standards, Practices and Outcomes.

Degree: 2013, University of Manchester

This thesis investigates and discusses the current design approaches and development trends of urban streets in China. As the methodological focus, multiple case studies and interviews are used to examine actual street design practice to identify the development policy bias of local governments. Since the 1990s, the great economic achievement in most Chinese cities has evoked significant growth in the number of automobiles, as well as the increasingly serious problems of road casualties and congestion. The traffic-engineering-based design approach which used to be widely adopted and implemented in western countries has dominated the development patterns of urban streets in modern China. The conventional paradigm exclusively focuses on the traffic function in urban streets resulting in morphological changes to the urban circulation environment and keeps on neglecting non-vehicular movement and non-traffic needs. The automobile- dominated urban circulation environment has had negative economic, social and public health impacts. Thus, a paradigm shift which calls for a more inclusive design approach for urban streets which balances functions of place and movement is urgently needed in China. To determine the challenges and opportunities for the new paradigm, this research identifies the cultural, political and technical factors for the traffic-centred design trends and the policy bias. Based on this, policy recommendations and an agenda for revolutionary change for achieving better design practice for urban streets in post-modern China are suggested. Advisors/Committee Members: WONG, CECILIA YLC, Wong, Cecilia, Hebbert, Michael.

Subjects/Keywords: urban street design; standards; practices; paradigm shift

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhang, Y. (2013). Urban Street Design in Modern China: Standards, Practices and Outcomes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:202124

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhang, Yi. “Urban Street Design in Modern China: Standards, Practices and Outcomes.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed November 17, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:202124.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhang, Yi. “Urban Street Design in Modern China: Standards, Practices and Outcomes.” 2013. Web. 17 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Zhang Y. Urban Street Design in Modern China: Standards, Practices and Outcomes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2013. [cited 2019 Nov 17]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:202124.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhang Y. Urban Street Design in Modern China: Standards, Practices and Outcomes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2013. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:202124


University of Manchester

2. Jarvis, Charles Edward Martin. The Reform of Sub-Market Housing in England: The Introduction of For-Profit Providers.

Degree: 2018, University of Manchester

The thesis examines the introduction of for-profit actors into the contemporary social housing market in England, with particular reference to the management and development of new social and affordable housing. It is an under-researched segment of social housing. The research aims to improve the understanding of how for-profit actors operate through an examination of the institutional and organisational responses in the social housing market. It conceptualises a tripartite theoretical framework, using principal-agent, institutional and organisational theory to assess the impacts that the introduction of these for-profit actors has had on the market. It will argue that for-profit actors are not new phenomena. There have been three waves of policy intervention used to introduce for-profit actors and modernise the social housing market. The latest wave, which enabled these actors to be licenced landlords, has been available since 2004, but it was only formalised by the Housing and Regeneration Act 2008. The 2008 Act opened the market up to regulated for-profit landlords and enabled them to operate and compete on a level playing field with existing not-for-profit landlords. The thesis has categorised three types of for-profit providers operating in the social housing market: legitimisers, opportunists and optimisers. It identified hybrid providers that have expanded their operations outside of the housing sector. The research also identified two types of market Disrupter operating in the broader regulated and unregulated sub-market. The first are developers that build housing and the second are subsidiaries of large international financial institutions new to the sector. During times of austerity and retrenchment of government funding, these findings propose a broader definition ‘sub-market price housing’ for policymakers to better describe the totality of the market. This new definition includes all the variants of housing provided using government subsidy and also those using market-led solutions. A formative research methodology was used combining document analysis, interviews with elite actors in the sector, case studies and summative interviews. Advisors/Committee Members: WONG, CECILIA YLC, Deas, Iain, Wong, Cecilia.

Subjects/Keywords: housing studies; social housing; hybrid organisations; for profit organisations; not for profit organisations; institutional theory; principal agent theory; organisational theory; organisational studies; typologies; market disrupters; contemporary social housing market; Housing and Regneration Act 2008; regulation; finance

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jarvis, C. E. M. (2018). The Reform of Sub-Market Housing in England: The Introduction of For-Profit Providers. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:315021

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jarvis, Charles Edward Martin. “The Reform of Sub-Market Housing in England: The Introduction of For-Profit Providers.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed November 17, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:315021.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jarvis, Charles Edward Martin. “The Reform of Sub-Market Housing in England: The Introduction of For-Profit Providers.” 2018. Web. 17 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Jarvis CEM. The Reform of Sub-Market Housing in England: The Introduction of For-Profit Providers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2018. [cited 2019 Nov 17]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:315021.

Council of Science Editors:

Jarvis CEM. The Reform of Sub-Market Housing in England: The Introduction of For-Profit Providers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2018. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:315021

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