Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Manchester" +contributor:("Sergeant, Jamie"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Manchester

1. Hughes, David Tom. The Value of Periodic Health Examination for Injury Prediction in Elite Football: Is the Prognosis Good?.

Degree: 2020, University of Manchester

The incidence of musculoskeletal injuries in elite football (soccer) is high. Injury prevention strategies have potential benefits to teams, such as improving player availability and therefore team performance, and reducing demand on medical and financial resources. Periodic health examination (PHE) is perceived to be key to injury prevention. Used by the majority of elite football teams, PHE consists of medical, musculoskeletal, functional and performance tests, typically evaluated during preseason and in-season periods. PHE is used to detect pathology that may be dangerous or performance limiting, to monitor rehabilitation and performance, and to measure factors thought to increase, or predict, an athlete's future injury risk. However, this latter function of PHE, and its use in informing individual injury prevention strategies, is contentious. Through eight papers, this thesis explores the value of PHE for injury prediction in elite football. The first paper describes the conceptual differences between aetiology and injury prediction, and argues that the related concept of prognosis is more relevant to PHE in practice. The second paper is a systematic review which demonstrates the serious limitations of the current evidence. Only age and a history of a previous hamstring injury have a confirmed association with future hamstring injuries, and no previous prognostic prediction models have been developed for any spinal or lower extremity injuries in elite players. The third paper is an audit of routinely collected injury and PHE data available at Manchester United Football Club, where index indirect muscle injury (I-IMI) outcomes affecting the lower extremity and sixty candidate prognostic factors are shown to be eligible for inclusion in prognosis research. The fourth and fifth papers investigate whether data recorded with inertial measurement units (IMUs) during two routinely used PHE tests at the Club could provide eligible candidate prognostic factors. These papers demonstrate that kinematic evaluation of single leg squats and kinetic analysis of running using these IMU systems are insufficiently reliable to be of value in prognostic research or for rehabilitation monitoring. The sixth paper is a protocol for a study to: 1) develop and internally validate a multivariable prognostic prediction model for individual injury risk prediction, and; 2) to explore the associations between additional PHE-derived factors and injury outcomes during a season in elite football players. The seventh and eighth papers contain the results of this study. The seventh paper shows that it is currently only possible to develop a modestly performing multivariable prognostic model with low potential for clinical utility. The eighth paper shows that while there may be a prognostic association between I-IMI occurrence and a hamstring injury greater than 12 months prior to PHE, no other factors have clear prognostic value over and above a player's age. In conclusion, PHE has no current value for injury prediction purposes and should only be… Advisors/Committee Members: SERGEANT, JAMIE JC, Callaghan, Michael, Sergeant, Jamie.

Subjects/Keywords: Athlete; Injury prevention; Muscle strain; Prediction; Prognosis; Screening; Sport; Sprains and strains

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hughes, D. T. (2020). The Value of Periodic Health Examination for Injury Prediction in Elite Football: Is the Prognosis Good?. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:325000

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hughes, David Tom. “The Value of Periodic Health Examination for Injury Prediction in Elite Football: Is the Prognosis Good?.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:325000.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hughes, David Tom. “The Value of Periodic Health Examination for Injury Prediction in Elite Football: Is the Prognosis Good?.” 2020. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Hughes DT. The Value of Periodic Health Examination for Injury Prediction in Elite Football: Is the Prognosis Good?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2020. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:325000.

Council of Science Editors:

Hughes DT. The Value of Periodic Health Examination for Injury Prediction in Elite Football: Is the Prognosis Good?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2020. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:325000


University of Manchester

2. Binkley, George Michael. An investigation of adherence to statin therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Degree: 2016, University of Manchester

BackgroundRheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are more likely to experience a cardiovascularevent (CVE) than the general population. This is a result of atherosclerotic diseaseaugmented by systemic inflammation. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarylcoenzyme A) reductase inhibitors (statins) lower the risk of CVEs;further, pleiotropic effects are of clinical relevance for RA disease activity. Manypatients do not achieve ideal clinical outcomes because of poor medicationadherence. This study sought to determine the rates and predictors of adherence inthe TRACE-RA population.MethodsData collected from the Trial of Atorvastatin for the primary prevention ofCardiovascular Events in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (TRACE-RA) wereused to meet these aims. Two thousand nine hundred and eighty six patients from102 centres were randomised to receive either atorvastatin or placebo. Adherencewas determined up to 3, 6 and 12 months using data on pill counts and self-reports.Rates and responses were dichotomised as adherent (>80% consumption or ‘Mosttablets consumed’) and non-adherent (<80% consumption or ‘Some/None tabletsconsumed’). Univariate logistic regression analysis and multivariate logisticregression analysis were performed to determine predictors of adherence for patientswith complete data in both arms of TRACE-RA and for those solely in theatorvastatin arm. The multivariate models were adjusted for age and gender.ResultsAdherence to trial medication was 49.4%, 49.1% and 50.1% up to 3, 6 and 12months respectively. No significant differences for the rates of adherence wereobserved between arms. Patients who consumed alcohol on a monthly or less basis(OR=0.65, 95%CI 0.42-0.97) were less likely to adhere to the allocated TRACE-RAintervention than patients who never consumed alcohol. Patients who reported‘extreme pain/ discomfort’ were 67% more likely to adhere to the TRACE-RAintervention than those who reported no pain/ discomfort (OR=1.67, 95%CI 0.96-2.90). In the atorvastatin arm, patients with a high disease activity were moreadherent towards statin therapy than patients in remission (OR=1.64, 95%CI 0.83-3.24).ConclusionAdherence to trial medication was sub-optimal in TRACE-RA. This research hasimportance for adherence in RA populations, predictors of adherence to statintherapy, and interventions such as counselling or adherence programmes.Underlying attitudes, motivations and beliefs of non-adherent patients requirefurther examination. Advisors/Committee Members: KITAS, GEORGE G, VERSTAPPEN, SUZANNE S, SERGEANT, JAMIE JC, Symmons, Deborah, Kitas, George, Verstappen, Suzanne, Sergeant, Jamie.

Subjects/Keywords: adherence; statin; rheumatoid arthritis; cardiovascular event; primary prevention; TRACE-RA

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Binkley, G. M. (2016). An investigation of adherence to statin therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:306313

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Binkley, George Michael. “An investigation of adherence to statin therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:306313.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Binkley, George Michael. “An investigation of adherence to statin therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.” 2016. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Binkley GM. An investigation of adherence to statin therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:306313.

Council of Science Editors:

Binkley GM. An investigation of adherence to statin therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2016. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:306313

.