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You searched for +publisher:"University of Manchester" +contributor:("Hann, Mark"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Manchester

1. Hughes-Morley, Adwoa. What are effective methods to recruit research participants into mental health trials?.

Degree: 2017, University of Manchester

Background: There is a great need for effective treatments for mental health problems. Randomised controlled trials are the gold standard for evaluating treatments, however recruitment into trials is challenging, highlighting a clear need for evidence-based recruitment strategies. This thesis aimed to systematically develop a recruitment intervention and evaluate its effectiveness for improving the recruitment of participants into mental health trials.Methods: A mixed-methods approach, adopting the Medical Research Council’s complex interventions framework: 1) a systematic review to identify the evidence base and describe the factors affecting recruitment into depression trials; 2) a qualitative study to understand patients’ decision-making process in declining to enrol in a depression trial; 3) development of a recruitment intervention, using Participatory Design methods; and 4) evaluation of the recruitment intervention, using a randomised controlled trial, embedded in an ongoing mental health trial (the EQUIP trial). The primary outcome was the proportion of participants enrolled in EQUIP. Results: From the systematic review, a conceptual framework of factors influencing the decision to participate was developed, which highlighted that the decision to enrol involves a judgement between risk and reward. Findings suggested that patient and public involvement in research (PPIR) might be advertised to potential participants to reduce such perceived risk. The qualitative study found positive views of trials. Interviewees’ decision making resembled a four-stage process; in each stage they either decided to decline or progressed to the next stage. In Stage 1, those with an established position of declining trials opted out – they are termed ‘prior decliners’. In Stage 2, those who opted out after judging themselves ineligible are termed ‘self-excluders’. In Stage 3, those who decided they did not need the trial therapy and opted out are termed ‘treatment decliners’. In Stage 4, those who opted out after judging that disadvantages outweighed advantages are termed ‘trial decliners’. While ‘prior decliners’ are unlikely to respond to trial recruitment initiatives, the factors leading others to decline are amenable to amelioration as they do not arise from a rejection of trials. We recruited a host mental health trial (EQUIP), and worked with key stakeholders, including mental health service users and carers, to develop an intervention using a leaflet to advertise the nature and function of the PPIR in EQUIP to potential trial participants. 34 community mental health teams were randomised and 8182 patients invited. For the primary outcome, 4% of patients in the PPIR group were enrolled versus 5.3% of the control group. The intervention was not effective for improving recruitment rates (adjusted OR= 0.75, 95% CI= 0.53 to 1.07, p=0.113). Conclusions: This thesis reports the largest ever trial to evaluate the impact of a recruitment intervention. It also reports the largest trial of a PPIR intervention and makes a contribution… Advisors/Committee Members: HANN, MARK RM, WAHEED, WAQUAS W, Bower, Peter, Hann, Mark, Waheed, Waquas.

Subjects/Keywords: Randomised controlled trial; Participant recruitment; Mental health; Patient and public involvement; Research methodology; Service user involvement; Study within a trial; Mesh: embedded trial; Mixed methods; Qualitative study; Meta-synthesis; Complex interventions framework; systematic review

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hughes-Morley, A. (2017). What are effective methods to recruit research participants into mental health trials?. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:306933

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hughes-Morley, Adwoa. “What are effective methods to recruit research participants into mental health trials?.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed November 18, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:306933.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hughes-Morley, Adwoa. “What are effective methods to recruit research participants into mental health trials?.” 2017. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Hughes-Morley A. What are effective methods to recruit research participants into mental health trials?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:306933.

Council of Science Editors:

Hughes-Morley A. What are effective methods to recruit research participants into mental health trials?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2017. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:306933


University of Manchester

2. Martinez, Yolanda. The Individual Contribution and Relative Importance of Self-Management and Quality of Care on Glycaemic Control in Mexican Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

Degree: 2013, University of Manchester

Introduction: The global burden of diabetes can be minimised by interventions focusing on the control of glucose levels. Effective self-management and quality of care have improved diabetes outcomes such as glycaemic levels. However, few studies directly evaluate the relative importance of individual aspects of self-management and quality of care on glycaemic control. Therefore, I evaluated the individual contribution and relative importance of specific aspects of self-management and quality of care on the glycaemic control of Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes.Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was conducted. Consecutive patients were recruited from the waiting rooms in five primary care practices in the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico (from December 2009 to April 2010). These practices are part of the largest social security institution in Mexico (the Mexican Institute for Social Security). Predictors of glycaemic control were measured from medical records and interviews with patients at baseline. Self-management was measured using four questionnaires: the Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ-24), the Medical Prescription Knowledge Questionnaire (MPKQ), the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA), and the Diabetes Self Efficacy Scale. Quality of care was measured using three questionnaires and by extracting data from medical records to evaluate an index of continuity of care (MMCI) and treatment intensification. The questionnaires used were the continuity of care scale from the General Practice Assessment Questionnaire (GPAQ), the Patient–Doctor Communication Scale (PDCS), and the Patient Satisfaction with Diabetes Care scale (PSDC). Glycaemic control (HbA1c levels) was measured at two time points: baseline and six month follow-up. The main analysis was a multivariate regression model with HbA1c at six-month follow-up as the dependent variable and with self-management and quality of care as predictors and demographic and clinical factors as covariates. A secondary analysis considered the interaction between self-management and quality of care in the prediction of HbA1c at six-month follow-up using a multivariate regression model including HbA1c at baseline in the model.Results: The multivariate linear regression model, that included all variables, was significant and explained 36 % of the variance (P <0.01). Patients had lower HbA1c at follow-up if they had lower levels of HbA1c at baseline, received care at one particular practice in the city, had diabetes of shorter duration, and were prescribed monotherapy. When HbA1c at baseline was removed from the model it explained 14% of the variance (P <0.01). Practice and medical prescription remained significant. In addition, lower levels of HbA1c at follow-up were related to the patient undergoing appropriate treatment intensification by their general practitioner. In the secondary analysis, the interaction showed that if treatment was not intensified, good self-managers had lower HbA1c (P <0.01) but if treatment was intensified, the level of… Advisors/Committee Members: GASK, LINDA L, CAMPBELL, STEPHEN SM, HANN, MARK RM, Gask, Linda, Campbell, Stephen, Bower, Peter, Hann, Mark.

Subjects/Keywords: Self-management; Quality of care; Type 2 diabetes; Glycaemic control

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Martinez, Y. (2013). The Individual Contribution and Relative Importance of Self-Management and Quality of Care on Glycaemic Control in Mexican Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:211266

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Martinez, Yolanda. “The Individual Contribution and Relative Importance of Self-Management and Quality of Care on Glycaemic Control in Mexican Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed November 18, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:211266.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Martinez, Yolanda. “The Individual Contribution and Relative Importance of Self-Management and Quality of Care on Glycaemic Control in Mexican Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.” 2013. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Martinez Y. The Individual Contribution and Relative Importance of Self-Management and Quality of Care on Glycaemic Control in Mexican Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2013. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:211266.

Council of Science Editors:

Martinez Y. The Individual Contribution and Relative Importance of Self-Management and Quality of Care on Glycaemic Control in Mexican Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2013. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:211266

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