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You searched for +publisher:"University of Manchester" +contributor:("HEATH, ANTHONY AF"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Huang, Yinxuan. Religious Involvement as Social Capital: Its Nature and Implications for Integration in Britain.

Degree: 2016, University of Manchester

Scholars in America have suggested that religion serves as a mechanism that fosters social capital and facilitate integration (Putnam, 2000; Wuthnow, 2002). This PhD thesis aims to investigate whether this observation also holds in Britain, which is becoming more secular and has a different pattern of immigration. It seeks to contribute to existing knowledge in this field by addressing the nature of religious involvement and its implications to integration in Britain. Drawing on the Citizenship Survey data, this thesis conducts rigorous analyses on the sociocultural characteristics of religious involvement, the connection between religious involvement and social capital, and the effects of religious involvement on cultural integration (termed ‘identity bridging’) and civic and economic integration (termed ‘status bridging’). A range of statistical methods are used in the thesis, including some advanced techniques such as structural equation modelling and Heckman selection model. The empirical analysis finds that religious involvement can be classified in different forms according to patterns in religious community participation and degree of subjective religiosity. Results in the analysis also suggest that participation in religious organizations is underpinned by both formal and informal participation, which coincides with Putnam’s (2000) notion of ‘maching’ and ‘schmoozing’. Different forms of religious involvement are shown to have distinct sociocultural characteristics, which are embedded in differences in social standings and cultural identities. The thesis finds that religious community participation serves as a mechanism for social capital, as it does it America. Compared to non-participants, individuals who are active in religious participation appear to have a much richer stock of social capital. ‘Maching’ is found to be related to greater engagement in volunteering in the wider community and social trust, while ‘schmoozing’ is found to be positively associated with social trust. Overall, the analyses provide evidence that religious community participation in general contributes to both identity bridging and status bridging. Individuals who are involved in ‘maching’ and ’schmoozing’ are shown to be more successful in cultural, civic, and economic integration. By contrast, individuals who are not involved in religious community participation, not least those having high subjective religiosity, are often found to be underachieving in most domains of integration. However, there is also some evidence suggesting that the social implications of ‘maching’ and ‘schmoozing’ are considerably distinct. Under most circumstances, ‘maching’ appear to play a more important role in integration compared to schmoozing. Finally, the analyses in this thesis show that patterns of the association between religious involvement and integration vary significantly across different ethno-religious groups in Britain. The results point to the variations in immigrant-related characteristics in religious participation, which is linked to… Advisors/Committee Members: HEATH, ANTHONY AF, Li, Yaojun, Heath, Anthony.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Huang, Y. (2016). Religious Involvement as Social Capital: Its Nature and Implications for Integration in Britain. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:302405

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Huang, Yinxuan. “Religious Involvement as Social Capital: Its Nature and Implications for Integration in Britain.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:302405.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Huang, Yinxuan. “Religious Involvement as Social Capital: Its Nature and Implications for Integration in Britain.” 2016. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Huang Y. Religious Involvement as Social Capital: Its Nature and Implications for Integration in Britain. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:302405.

Council of Science Editors:

Huang Y. Religious Involvement as Social Capital: Its Nature and Implications for Integration in Britain. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2016. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:302405


University of Manchester

2. Zhang, Min. Social Mobility over Three Generations in Britain.

Degree: 2018, University of Manchester

Social mobility has been extensively documented based on two-generational associations. Whereas a few studies suggest that the approach related to social inequalities should be open to multigenerational associations, the topic of social mobility over multiple generations is still at its blooming stage. Very little is known about multigenerational effects on education in Britain and about empirical evidence of the mechanisms that underlie multigenerational effects. Drawing on the British Household Panel Survey and the UK Longitudinal Household Study, this thesis examines social mobility over three generations in Britain. The central aims of the thesis are to explore direct grandparental effects on grandchildren’s educational and class attainments independent of parental influences. In particular, it focuses on mechanisms through which grandparental effects operate. The thesis finds that grandparental class is significantly associated with grandchildren’s educational achievement, despite parental class, parental education, and parental wealth being taken into account. Regarding the mechanisms, the evidence suggests first that the impacts of grandparental class on education remain even though grandparents have passed away at the time of the survey, and second that the impacts disappear only when grandparents have only infrequent contact with the family. Furthermore, I find that grandparental effects are significantly stronger on grandchildren originating from advantaged parents than on those from disadvantaged parents, indicating the strong persistence of inequalities at the top of social stratification. The research also highlights significant, albeit modest, effects of grandparental class on grandchildren’s class attainment over and above parental influences. For grandsons, maternal grandparental class still matters even after grandsons’ education has been controlled for. In particular, self-employed grandparents have a strong impact on grandsons’ likelihood of engagement in self-employment, a pattern that holds true even when parents are not self-employed. For granddaughters, neither paternal nor maternal grandparental class is found to have a direct substantial impact on granddaughters’ class after granddaughters’ education has been controlled for. The thesis suggests that the conventional social mobility approach based on parentchild associations may overestimate the effects of parental characteristics and underestimate the effects of family origins. Family advantages run deep; they are maintained over generations in Britain. Advisors/Committee Members: HEATH, ANTHONY AF, Li, Yaojun, Heath, Anthony.

Subjects/Keywords: social mobility; educational inequality; class inequality; grandparents; multigenerational inequality

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhang, M. (2018). Social Mobility over Three Generations in Britain. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:314677

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhang, Min. “Social Mobility over Three Generations in Britain.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:314677.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhang, Min. “Social Mobility over Three Generations in Britain.” 2018. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Zhang M. Social Mobility over Three Generations in Britain. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2018. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:314677.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhang M. Social Mobility over Three Generations in Britain. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2018. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:314677


University of Manchester

3. Sevilla Encinas, Alejandro Miguel. Disentangling inequality of educational opportunities: The transition to higher education in Chile.

Degree: 2018, University of Manchester

This thesis examines inequality of educational opportunities (IEO) in the transition to higher education. IEO measures the difference in higher education entry rates across social groups. The theoretical framework lays on Boudon's decomposition of IEO into primary and secondary effects of stratification. Furthermore, the theoretical propositions of Maximally Maintained Inequality (MMI) and Effectively Maintained Inequality (EMI) were also assessed to gain further understanding of IEO. The longitudinal data for the empirical analysis was created for a student cohort by linking administrative records of Chile's national student register, standardised tests and higher education enrolment. The student cohort was followed through the 12-years of compulsory education up to the transition to higher education, a year after completing secondary education. The results from the empirical analysis showed that secondary effects were consistently predominant over primary effects, driving the overall IEO. On the other hand, controlling for school characteristics increased the relative importance of secondary effects. However, primary effects explained a large extent of IEO in the transition to traditional (most prestigious) universities, by the same token, in the transition to undergraduate programmes. Differences in parental education levels between secondary education completion and higher education transitions proved to be consistent with MMI. Likewise, the higher likelihood of less advantaged students to enrol in vocational colleges or vocational programmes, and the higher likelihood of advantaged students to enrol in traditional universities or undergraduate programmes, evidenced support for EMI. The modelling setting was based on non-linear mediation modelling, accounting for sample-selection in the student cohort, two-level cross-classification between primary and secondary schools, and multinomial outcomes for type of institution and programme. This thesis contributes to the educational attainment literature by finding evidence that, in emerging economies like Chile, educational inequality persists despite the sustained expansion of the educational system. Advisors/Committee Members: HEATH, ANTHONY AF, CHANDOLA, TARANI T, Li, Yaojun, Heath, Anthony, Chandola, Tarani.

Subjects/Keywords: educational inequality; higher education; primary and secondary effects; mediation model; sample-selection; educational system

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sevilla Encinas, A. M. (2018). Disentangling inequality of educational opportunities: The transition to higher education in Chile. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:313441

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sevilla Encinas, Alejandro Miguel. “Disentangling inequality of educational opportunities: The transition to higher education in Chile.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:313441.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sevilla Encinas, Alejandro Miguel. “Disentangling inequality of educational opportunities: The transition to higher education in Chile.” 2018. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Sevilla Encinas AM. Disentangling inequality of educational opportunities: The transition to higher education in Chile. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2018. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:313441.

Council of Science Editors:

Sevilla Encinas AM. Disentangling inequality of educational opportunities: The transition to higher education in Chile. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2018. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:313441

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