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You searched for +publisher:"University of Manchester" +contributor:("Gilman, Tucker"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Manchester

1. Invernizzi, Edith. The evolution of human post-marital residence.

Degree: 2016, University of Manchester

Post-marital residence is an aspect of human cultures strongly connected to ecology. It influences the dynamics of fitness conflict within the family nucleus, but it also interacts with environment’s ecology through its dependence on resources. The problem of why this trait should take different forms within the same species has been the subject of a longstanding debate. Here, I will present a theoretical simulation study modelling the emergence of post-marital residence strategies (PMRS), whose results show how reproductive cost and offspring investment are drivers of sex-biased dispersal. The mechanism described represents an underlying factor to strategy evolution, in-built in human life-history, with which other ecological aspects are likely to interact. This outcome places the two factors mentioned at the centre of the discussion on strategy emergence. To attempt an empirical investigation of sex differences in offspring investment, I will present a fieldwork study conducted among a Chinese ethnic minority, the Mosuo, in which members of a married couple reside separately, each with their matrilineal kin. This study consists in a series of exploratory analyses of labour effort allocation and is aimed at addressing the problem of male contribution to household subsistence (here seen as a form of family investment). My perspective, as formed from the results, is of the emergence of different strategies as (also) resulting from the unstable balances reached in the conflict for reproductive investment between the sexes.

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Advisors/Committee Members: GILMAN, TUCKER RT, Gilman, Tucker, Chamberlain, Andrew.

Subjects/Keywords: Human sex-biased dispersal; Cultural evolution; Human behavioural ecology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Invernizzi, E. (2016). The evolution of human post-marital residence. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:306507

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Invernizzi, Edith. “The evolution of human post-marital residence.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed October 14, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:306507.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Invernizzi, Edith. “The evolution of human post-marital residence.” 2016. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Invernizzi E. The evolution of human post-marital residence. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:306507.

Council of Science Editors:

Invernizzi E. The evolution of human post-marital residence. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2016. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:306507


University of Manchester

2. Gómez, Miguel. Plasticity in reproductive behaviours as a response to ecological changes.

Degree: 2018, University of Manchester

The thesis presented here utilizes a variety of methods and study systems to address how ecological promote plasticity in reproductive behaviours. We study mate choice, copulation and parental care as the different reproductive behaviours, as they can be envisioned as representatives of different stages of the reproductive cycle and can be subject to different selection pressures. With the use of computer simulations we study the conditions of sex ratio and cost of courting under which a learned mate preference in males or in both sexes can evolve. We found that for males, maternal imprinting is the most advantageous imprinting strategy, but when both sexes imprint, paternal imprinting in both sexes is the most advantageous strategy. We show that environmental change can lead to the evolution of sexual imprinting by both sexes. A study using mesocosm and mating trial experiments, measuring female survival and male mating success was used to study the role of intra- and interspecific interactions in mating behaviour (competition and harassment) in Calopteryx splendens. We showed that intense intraspecific male-male competition reduces harassment over females and increases female survival. On the other side, interspecific reproductive interference can reduce male mating success and can increase female survival. Finally, theory on the use of social learning was tested using Drosophila melanogaster oviposition site choice. We show that fruit flies use social learning more after they experience heterogeneous environments. However, our results suggest that the use of social learning was driven by fruit flies signalling more when they experience heterogeneous environments, instead of driven by copying others decisions, as theoretical predictions suggest. We also show that the use of social learning is an innate trait, opening the opportunity for the study of the genomic basis of social learning. Advisors/Committee Members: NAVARRO LOPEZ, EVA EM, Gilman, Tucker, Navarro Lopez, Eva.

Subjects/Keywords: sexual selection; plasticity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gómez, M. (2018). Plasticity in reproductive behaviours as a response to ecological changes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:315700

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gómez, Miguel. “Plasticity in reproductive behaviours as a response to ecological changes.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed October 14, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:315700.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gómez, Miguel. “Plasticity in reproductive behaviours as a response to ecological changes.” 2018. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Gómez M. Plasticity in reproductive behaviours as a response to ecological changes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:315700.

Council of Science Editors:

Gómez M. Plasticity in reproductive behaviours as a response to ecological changes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2018. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:315700

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