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You searched for +publisher:"University of Manchester" +contributor:("Erin, Charles"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Manchester

1. Lyons, Barry (finbar). ‘Who Is Silent Gives Consent’: Power And Medical Decision-Making For Children.

Degree: 2011, University of Manchester

This thesis seeks to examine how healthcare decisions are made for children, with a particular focus on situations where medical interventions that (1) are not intended to advance the medical welfare of the individual child (eg bone marrow donation and research without therapeutic intent involving young children), or (2) are contrary to the expressed will of the child (e.g. the imposition of life-saving treatment on adolescents who have refused it), are authorised by parents or the state. The authorisation of these procedures is contentious because they breach the child’s bodily integrity while either (a) lacking a clear therapeutic purpose with regard to that child, or (b) being imposed even though refused by a possibly competent adolescent. Their controversial nature has lead to attempts to justify these procedures, generally by the application of ideal-type adult-child relationship theories. The four papers at the core of this thesis examine these legitimising propositions, but demonstrate that they are insufficiently robust to legitimise the acts in question. Instead, this thesis raises questions about inequality; about why it is deemed acceptable to take the tissue of the vulnerable incompetent but not the capable adult; or why it is appropriate to impose different tests of mental capacity on the adolescent and the adult, or of competence on the ‘criminal’ child and ‘innocent’ teenager. It is proposed that the reason that inequitable treatment can occur is because adults sit in a position of power and authority relative to children. The common themes in all four papers are thus the issues of power, inequality and fairness. There is also a focus on the use of language, and it is argued that terms are used in academic debate about children’s healthcare issues that lead to a lack of clarity and transparency in discussions about the imposition of unchosen healthcare burdens on vulnerable populations. If we hold that children are morally relevant beings deserving of respect then debates about matters that concern them should take place using language that avoids obfuscation and the cloaking of adult interests. Advisors/Committee Members: BRAZIER, MARGOT MR, ERIN, CHARLES CA, Brazier, Margot, Erin, Charles, Brassington, Iain.

Subjects/Keywords: Children; Parents; Healthcare decision-making; Consent; Power

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lyons, B. (. (2011). ‘Who Is Silent Gives Consent’: Power And Medical Decision-Making For Children. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:123250

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lyons, Barry (finbar). “‘Who Is Silent Gives Consent’: Power And Medical Decision-Making For Children.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:123250.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lyons, Barry (finbar). “‘Who Is Silent Gives Consent’: Power And Medical Decision-Making For Children.” 2011. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Lyons B(. ‘Who Is Silent Gives Consent’: Power And Medical Decision-Making For Children. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2011. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:123250.

Council of Science Editors:

Lyons B(. ‘Who Is Silent Gives Consent’: Power And Medical Decision-Making For Children. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2011. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:123250

2. Snelling, Paul. Personal responsibility for health: meaning, extent and consequences.

Degree: 2014, University of Manchester

Like the rest of the western world, the UK faces a significant increase in the prevalence of diseases associated with lifestyle. Smoking rates have reduced, but increasing obesity has contributed to alarming increases in diabetes. Discovery of the correlation between behaviour and poor health has, since the 1970s, resulted in public health policies emphasising behaviour change, and personal responsibility; an emphasis that survived later research which demonstrated social, genetic and psychological determinants on behaviour and health. The latest version of the NHS constitution exhorts us to ‘recognise that you can make a significant contribution to your own, and your family’s, good health and wellbeing, and take personal responsibility for it.’ This thesis seeks to clarify the meaning and extent of personal responsibility for health, and at its core are four papers published in peer-reviewed journals. The first clarifies the concept concluding that it is best understood in a tripartite conception of a moral agent having obligations and being held responsible if he fails to meet them. The following two papers discuss the nature of the obligations, using utilitarian reasoning and arguments from analogy. First, an exploration of the moral obligations for our own health is undertaken via an analysis of the practice of tombstoning, jumping from height into water. I conclude that the obligations are of process rather than outcome, consisting of an epistemic duty to determine the health related consequences of our acts, and a reflective duty to consider these consequences for us and for those who share our lives. Second, following an examination of the moral status of blood donation, I conclude that despite its presentation as a praiseworthy and supererogatory act, it is more properly regarded as a prima facie obligation, supported by arguments from beneficence and justice. The final paper discusses the final part of the tripartite conception of personal responsibility for health: being held responsible. I discuss the nature of blame and extend the tombstoning analogy as a way of testing my own intuitions in response to an imagined adult son who has undertaken this dangerous activity. I argue that the notion of blame is not generally allowed as part of the patient – professional relationship, and yet without considering blame, the concept of personal responsibility for health is incomplete. I conclude that if the epistemic and reflective duties, individually applied, conclude that an obligation is owed, it is owed to those within personal relationships, and holding people responsible for their health-effecting behaviour is also best undertaken within these relationships.I conclude the thesis by considering the implications for professional practice. Inevitably this leads to consideration of the promotion of personal autonomy in health care. A more relational account of autonomy is suggested. Facilitating the epistemic duty so that individuals are better able to understand the risks of their behaviour requires rethinking of… Advisors/Committee Members: ERIN, CHARLES CA, BRASSINGTON, IAIN IM, Brazier, Margot, Erin, Charles, Brassington, Iain.

Subjects/Keywords: Responsibility for health; Health promotion; Tombstoning; Blood donation; Blame

…Copyright”) and s/he has given The University of Manchester the right to use such Copyright… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Snelling, P. (2014). Personal responsibility for health: meaning, extent and consequences. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:240186

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Snelling, Paul. “Personal responsibility for health: meaning, extent and consequences.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:240186.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Snelling, Paul. “Personal responsibility for health: meaning, extent and consequences.” 2014. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Snelling P. Personal responsibility for health: meaning, extent and consequences. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:240186.

Council of Science Editors:

Snelling P. Personal responsibility for health: meaning, extent and consequences. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2014. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:240186

3. Heavey, Patrick Joseph. Ethical Issues in Synthetic Biology.

Degree: 2013, University of Manchester

Synthetic biology has been defined as: “the design and construction of new biological parts, devices, and systems, and the re-design of existing, natural biological systems for useful purposes” (syntheticbiology.org). The convergence of scientific fields such as molecular biology, computer science and others have rendered it a natural progression, based on existing knowledge.The fact that humanity has reached a stage of development where it seems feasible to “create” life, or design it to a high degree of specificity, is a significant milestone in its history. It generates important ethical questions: Is synthetic biology something good, a natural use of humanity’s talents, or is it a step towards megalomania, playing God, a usurpation of his role? Is it really a natural progression, nature advancing to a state where its products can, in turn, improve nature itself; or does it challenge the dignity of nature by virtue of its “unnaturalness”? Is it an expression of the creative talent of humanity, thus enhancing human dignity, and perhaps that of all life, or does it challenge the dignity of life itself? Regarding its potential consequences, it may, if it succeeds, lead humanity to a new level of development, a paradigm shift comparable with the scientific or industrial revolutions, through a vast increase in scientific knowledge, and subsequent technological developments in all relevant areas, including medicine, food production and fuel development. However, there is potential for serious accidents if synthetic organisms interact with naturally occurring ones, possibly affecting the future course of evolution. Synthetic biology also offers the possibility of creating ever more powerful weapons, more easily than ever before; the technology is reaching a stage where any interested members of the public may be able to create weapons of mass destruction. Synbio is a dual use technology, offering potential for both good and evil. Its potential for either appears to be greater than any other technology that has existed.In this thesis I evaluate the ethics of synthetic biology from the following ethical perspectives – deontology, consequentialism and theology. I am approaching it from several viewpoints so as to give as wide an analysis of the issues as possible. I also evaluate the effectiveness of these standard ethical tools for evaluating synbio ethics. In addition, I examine whether ethics should be more deeply integrated into the day-to-day scientific research in synbio. As a secondary study, I discuss regulation, the main legal issue that synthetic biology generates. Advisors/Committee Members: STANTON, CATHERINE CE, Harris, John, Erin, Charles, Stanton, Catherine.

Subjects/Keywords: Synthetic biology; Ethics; Catholic; God; Theology; Methodology; Regulation; Bioterror; Biosafety

…x29; and he has given the University of Manchester the right to use such Copyright for any… …Issues in Synthetic Biology.” Presentation, University of Manchester School of Law Postgraduate… …albeit footnoting them where appropriate. 1 University of Manchester, School of Law… …FORM OF THIS THESIS The PhD in Bioethics and Medical Jurisprudence at the University of… …Manchester is assessed by a “structured doctoral thesis,” which differs somewhat from normal… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Heavey, P. J. (2013). Ethical Issues in Synthetic Biology. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:196435

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Heavey, Patrick Joseph. “Ethical Issues in Synthetic Biology.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:196435.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Heavey, Patrick Joseph. “Ethical Issues in Synthetic Biology.” 2013. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Heavey PJ. Ethical Issues in Synthetic Biology. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:196435.

Council of Science Editors:

Heavey PJ. Ethical Issues in Synthetic Biology. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2013. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:196435

.