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You searched for +publisher:"University of Manchester" +contributor:("CASSELL, CATHERINE CM"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Manchester

1. Hayward, Simon. SUCCESS FACTORS IN THE TRANSITION TOWARDS DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP IN LARGE ORGANISATIONS.

Degree: 2015, University of Manchester

The thesis reviews recent and current literature on leadership, and in particular on distributed leadership and complexity leadership theories. It describes my research into the factors affecting the success of transition towards a more distributed approach to leadership in two cases: one is a large UK private company and the other is a large UK university. The longitudinal research was conducted over the period from 2011 to 2013, using repeated interviews at senior and middle management levels, document analysis and observation to collect a rich set of data about both cases. I used a template to help analyse the data from each case. Through subsequent cross-case analysis the thesis identifies certain factors that influence the degree of success in making the transition to a distributed form of leadership, which involves not only devolved decision making but also increased levels of collaboration and organisational agility, which are key concerns of leaders of large organisations according to recent research across top 250 companies in the UK (Ipsos MORI, 2015: 5). The conclusion from my research is a framework called connected leadership, which describes the critical success factors and how they inter-relate. The first factor is having senior leadership committed to being role models, which is a pre-requisite for successful transition. There are then two factors that lay a strong foundation for the transition, namely having a shared organisational purpose and vison and values-based approach to leadership behaviour. Finally there are factors that then make distributed leadership work in practice: consistently devolved decision making, an emphasis on collaborative achievement, and agility and learning. The thesis provides practitioners with insight at both the organisational and leadership role levels, based on the connected leadership model. At the organisational level, I have derived from the research certain indicators for each factor that help diagnose and plan for the introduction of a distributed leadership approach. At the leadership role level the framework provides a helpful guide to developing leadership capability and role definition. The connected leadership model represents a coherent guide for leaders to use as a template for successful transition to a more distributed, collaborative and agile organisation, which is able to compete effectively in the 21st century networked society. Academically, this thesis provides a synthesis of distributed and complexity leadership theories, as well as drawing on authentic leadership theory, in order to understand the organisational and human dynamics that influence the transition to a more distributed leadership approach. Both cases are large organisations, which means that the factor framework provides relevant insight into how distributed leadership can be effective in large and relatively complex organisations. Advisors/Committee Members: CASSELL, CATHERINE CM, Bresnen, Michael, Cassell, Catherine.

Subjects/Keywords: Leadership Distributed Connected Engagement Authentic Complexity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hayward, S. (2015). SUCCESS FACTORS IN THE TRANSITION TOWARDS DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP IN LARGE ORGANISATIONS. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:263168

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hayward, Simon. “SUCCESS FACTORS IN THE TRANSITION TOWARDS DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP IN LARGE ORGANISATIONS.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed December 13, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:263168.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hayward, Simon. “SUCCESS FACTORS IN THE TRANSITION TOWARDS DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP IN LARGE ORGANISATIONS.” 2015. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Hayward S. SUCCESS FACTORS IN THE TRANSITION TOWARDS DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP IN LARGE ORGANISATIONS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:263168.

Council of Science Editors:

Hayward S. SUCCESS FACTORS IN THE TRANSITION TOWARDS DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP IN LARGE ORGANISATIONS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2015. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:263168


University of Manchester

2. Goldblatt, Dana Lynn. An Investigation into the Determinants and Moderators of Women Attaining and Retaining CEO Positions.

Degree: 2017, University of Manchester

This thesis explores gender-related barriers in CEO successions. Only 4% of Fortune 500 CEOs are female despite the fact that women have held the majority of college degrees in the US since the late 1990’s and now comprise almost half of the workforce and the majority of managerial positions. Their representation is low even in comparison to the other two top management positions from which CEOs are typically sourced. It is less than one-third of the percentage of both female executive officers (15%) and board directors (17%). A holistic and qualitative research approach was utilized. Data were gathered on societal, individual and organizational factors through one-on-one, semi-structured interviews with board directors, executive search consultants and female CEOs, and analyzed using computer-assisted coding software. This thesis challenges the perception that women’s individual barriers are the main reason why there are so few female CEOs. While all three types of barriers were found, organizational barriers appear to be the most important. The convergence of predominately male board directors, CEOs and top executive search consultants with informal, subjective, secretive and disparate talent management and CEO successions programs effectively results in the CEO position being a better fit for men than women. While moderating factors were beneficial to the women who have become CEOs, many factors were found for why they cannot be relied upon to greatly increase the number of female CEOs. A deliberate and comprehensive effort by society, individuals and organizations is required.

Purpose - Only 4% of Fortune 500 CEOs are female despite the fact that women have held the majority of college degrees in the US since the late 1990’s and now comprise almost half of the workforce and the majority of managerial positions. Their representation is low even in comparison to the other two top management positions from which CEOs are typically sourced. It is less than one-third of the percentage of both female executive officers (15%) and board directors (17%). The purpose of this study was to explore barriers that women face in attaining and retaining CEO positions. Design/Methodology/Approach - The study utilized a qualitative and holistic research approach. Data were gathered on societal, individual and organizational factors through one-on-one, semi-structured interviews with board directors, executive search consultants and female CEOs, and analyzed using computer-assisted coding software.Originality/Value - Societal, individual and organizational gender-related CEO successions barriers were identified and their relative importance was determined. Practices that have helped female CEO overcome them and may have the potential to increase the number of female CEOs were also illuminated.

Advisors/Committee Members: CASSELL, CATHERINE CM, Rubery, Jill, Cassell, Catherine.

Subjects/Keywords: above the glass ceiling; CEO search; CEO succession; executive search; female board directors; female CEOs; female executives; gender barriers; succession planning; talent management; women in top management; workplace culture and climate; career barriers

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Goldblatt, D. L. (2017). An Investigation into the Determinants and Moderators of Women Attaining and Retaining CEO Positions. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:307122

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Goldblatt, Dana Lynn. “An Investigation into the Determinants and Moderators of Women Attaining and Retaining CEO Positions.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed December 13, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:307122.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Goldblatt, Dana Lynn. “An Investigation into the Determinants and Moderators of Women Attaining and Retaining CEO Positions.” 2017. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Goldblatt DL. An Investigation into the Determinants and Moderators of Women Attaining and Retaining CEO Positions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:307122.

Council of Science Editors:

Goldblatt DL. An Investigation into the Determinants and Moderators of Women Attaining and Retaining CEO Positions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2017. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:307122

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