Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Manchester" +contributor:("Burton, Jamie"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Manchester

1. Al-Abdi, Yaser. A Three-Dimensional Customer Commitment Model: Its Impact on Relational Outcomes.

Degree: 2010, University of Manchester

Customer’s ever increasing bargaining power makes it particularly important that practitioners and researchers more thoroughly understand the complex nature of customer commitment. Not surprisingly, however, although the construct of commitment has emerged as one of the key constructs in relationship marketing and has been widely studied in literature, there has been very little agreement on the conceptualisation of the construct.Building upon relationship marketing and organisational behaviour literature, the aim of this research is to extend our understanding of the nature of customer commitment by developing a three-dimensional customer commitment model relaying on commitment theory from the organisational behaviour literature; affective desire-based (AC), calculative cost-based (CC), and normative obligation-based (NC). Relationships among the commitment dimensions and relationships with a number of loyalty relational outcomes, namely, intention to stay (ITS), word of mouth (WOM), and willingness to pay (WTP) were investigated in this study. Using survey questionnaire distributed among customers of cell phone services (N=525), the data was analysed by structural equation modeling (SEM) and then additional analysis was employed to further demystify the complexity of the commitment concept.The results suggest that AC is the dominant source that generates customer loyalty, in line with the state of literature. Both cost-based and surprisingly obligation-based have shown detrimental effects on maintaining and developing the customer-service provider relationship. Additional analysis with various scenarios was implemented using mean split as cut score for high/low commitment dimensions. The findings suggest NC turns to have important positive role on relational outcomes when both AC and CC are below the mean split. When both AC and CC are high NC negatively affect at least ITS but at the same time make a clear positive effect on WTP. The findings can be instructional for identifying how firms can bend various marketing sources to secure more loyal customers to the service provider. Advisors/Committee Members: BURTON, JAMIE AJ, Burton, Jamie, Kang, Jikyeong.

Subjects/Keywords: calculative commitment; affective commitment; normative commitment; word-of-mouth; willingness to pay; intention to stay

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Al-Abdi, Y. (2010). A Three-Dimensional Customer Commitment Model: Its Impact on Relational Outcomes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:98629

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Al-Abdi, Yaser. “A Three-Dimensional Customer Commitment Model: Its Impact on Relational Outcomes.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed June 15, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:98629.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Al-Abdi, Yaser. “A Three-Dimensional Customer Commitment Model: Its Impact on Relational Outcomes.” 2010. Web. 15 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Al-Abdi Y. A Three-Dimensional Customer Commitment Model: Its Impact on Relational Outcomes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2010. [cited 2019 Jun 15]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:98629.

Council of Science Editors:

Al-Abdi Y. A Three-Dimensional Customer Commitment Model: Its Impact on Relational Outcomes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2010. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:98629


University of Manchester

2. Crowley, Edward Andrew. The Impact of National Culture and Other Cognitive Factors on Servitization.

Degree: 2019, University of Manchester

Servitization research has provided rich insight into servitization at the organisational level and at a broad level across industries; however, understanding of servitization at the individual industry level has been limited. The research began as an exploration of the servitization of the office products (OP) industry. This thesis defined servitization as the shift from a product-centric business model and logic to a service-centric approach (Kowalkowski et al., 2017), which can be measured by comparing the proportion of the firm’s (or business unit’s) revenue from services to total revenue for that firm (or business unit). Quantitative grounded theory was used to analyse longitudinal data from interviews with 5,913 corporate decision makers responsible for service contract decisions between 2008 and 2012. Consistent with the grounded theory method, data guided the analysis and indicated that industry level servitization shows similar characteristics to servitization at the firm level in terms of the evolution of service offerings and the customer outcomes achieved from these offerings. The analysis also indicated that within the OP industry firms were not achieving a consistent level of servitization (as measured by service revenues), despite their similar service offerings and results. To understand this phenomenon, a second phase of research was undertaken using in-depth personal interviews with industry executives to understand why some firms were not achieving the same level of servitization despite their desire to achieve a higher level of servitization. This desire for a higher level of servitization is identified as servitization intent. The second phase of research identified a set of cognitive factors, including what is valued, tradition, belief in services, risk tolerance, intentionality, perspective to service, desire, change tolerance and trust, that appear to represent challenges in the servitization process for some firms. These appear to be limiting factors to achieving servitization intent for firms headquartered in Japan but not for firms headquartered in the United States (US). The servitization process thus appears to be influenced by the national culture of the firm. This is the first contribution of this research. Based upon this doctorial research, a three-layered model of servitization factors was developed, which includes cognitive factors at the micro–meso level, organizational factors at the meso level and industry level factors at the macro level. National culture appears to influence both the cognitive and organizational factors, but it does not appear to be a factor at the industry level. This model represents the second contribution of this research. The third contribution of this research is demonstrating the use of a mixed-methods research design guided by the grounded theory method to provide a dual lens approach for understanding servitization at both the industry level and the organizational / cognitive level. This dual lens approach was critical in identifying that at an… Advisors/Committee Members: ZOLKIEWSKI, JUDITH JM, Burton, Jamie, Zolkiewski, Judith.

Subjects/Keywords: Servitization Intent; National Culture; Cognitive Factors; Organizational Culture; Industry Factors; Servitization

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Crowley, E. A. (2019). The Impact of National Culture and Other Cognitive Factors on Servitization. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:318428

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crowley, Edward Andrew. “The Impact of National Culture and Other Cognitive Factors on Servitization.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed June 15, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:318428.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crowley, Edward Andrew. “The Impact of National Culture and Other Cognitive Factors on Servitization.” 2019. Web. 15 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Crowley EA. The Impact of National Culture and Other Cognitive Factors on Servitization. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2019. [cited 2019 Jun 15]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:318428.

Council of Science Editors:

Crowley EA. The Impact of National Culture and Other Cognitive Factors on Servitization. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2019. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:318428

3. Li, Helen Hai Yan. An Exploration of Relationship Development and Management in International Business Schools: MBA Students’ Perspectives.

Degree: 2014, University of Manchester

ABSTRACTAn Exploration of Relationship Development and Management in International Business Schools: MBA Students’ PerspectivesHelen HY SR Li; PhD in Business Administration; The University of Manchester; 2014Given the increasing importance of international higher education (HE) markets from a business perspective (Chadee and Naidoo, 2009; Anonymous, 2011a, 2012a), this research responds to the review of Hemsley-Brown and Oplatka (2006) that highlighted a lack of holistic approaches and theoretical models to address the nature of the HE service; and built on scholarly work (Mazzarol and Hosie, 1996; Mazzarol, 1998; Naude and Ivy, 1999; Ivy and Naude, 2004; Ivy, 2008) relating to HE marketing strategies. The research moves from the traditional marketing approach adopted predominantly in the existing literature of HE marketing (i.e. Mazzarol et al., 2003; Hemsley-Brown and Oplatka, 2006) and instead adopts a relational approach. This offers an alternative way of investigating the HE service, and contributes towards a broader theoretical perspective on HE strategy and a deeper understanding of the complex nature of the HE service. The theoretical background of this research was based on both the Interaction Approach (Håkansson ed., 1982) and the Relationship Life-Cycle Model (Ford, 1980; Wilkinson and Young, 1994). In response to limited existing research on the students’ perspective in HE (Trowler, 2010), this study provides a means of exploring HE marketing from the perspective of a markets-as-networks tradition (Håkansson and Snehota, 1995; Ford et al., 2002). Due to the adoption of a social constructivist epistemological stance (Gergen, 1985; Tashakkori and Teddlie, 1998), a case studies research approach (Yin, 2003, 2011) and semi-structured interviews (Denzin and Lincoln, 1994; Miles and Huberman, 1994) were utilised. Template analysis was chosen for data examination and interpretation (King, 1998, 2004), from a longitudinal contextual time-space of prospective students, current students and future alumni viewpoints (Halinen and Törnroos, 2005). The research findings suggest that the HE service is interactive and relational by nature, comprising six key relationships that are fundamentally important from the perspective of students being the focal-actor. These include relationships with alumni, other students, academic staff, administrative staff, multi-national companies (MNCs), and overseas exchange partner higher education institutions (HEIs). Despite the multiple roles of students, as clients (Mills et al., 1983; Hill, 1995), producers (Armstrong, 1995), products (Emery, et al., 2001; Modell, 2005) and customers (Kotler and Fox, 1985; Conway et al., 1994) of the HEIs, students are the users of these networks. They are also the beneficiaries of these key relationships, as they perceive and seek the added-value of the HE service, such as knowledge enrichment and employability enhancement. The synergy of these relationships and networks collectively contribute to the added-value of the HE service, enhance… Advisors/Committee Members: MURPHY, JOHN J, Burton, Jamie, Murphy, John.

Subjects/Keywords: Relationship Interactions; Network Effects; HE Marketing

University of Manchester; 2014 Given the increasing importance of international higher education… …rights in it (the “Copyright”), and s/he has given The University of Manchester… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Li, H. H. Y. (2014). An Exploration of Relationship Development and Management in International Business Schools: MBA Students’ Perspectives. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:221991

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Li, Helen Hai Yan. “An Exploration of Relationship Development and Management in International Business Schools: MBA Students’ Perspectives.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed June 15, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:221991.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Li, Helen Hai Yan. “An Exploration of Relationship Development and Management in International Business Schools: MBA Students’ Perspectives.” 2014. Web. 15 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Li HHY. An Exploration of Relationship Development and Management in International Business Schools: MBA Students’ Perspectives. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2014. [cited 2019 Jun 15]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:221991.

Council of Science Editors:

Li HHY. An Exploration of Relationship Development and Management in International Business Schools: MBA Students’ Perspectives. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2014. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:221991

.