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You searched for +publisher:"University of Maine" +contributor:("Kathryn Yerxa"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Maine

1. Randall, Jodi L. Preparing for Effective Program Dissemination and Implementation: An Analysis of Problems and Proposals for the iCook 4-H Program.

Degree: MS, Food Science and Human Nutrition, 2016, University of Maine

While much effort has gone into the creation of obesity prevention programs like iCook 4-H, such programs remain largely under-utilized. The disconnect between research and practice highlights the necessity of dissemination and implementation strategies to ensure programs become adopted into practice. Creating a well-informed systematic approach to implementation will ensure that the iCook 4-H program will be implemented efficaciously and sustainably to improve the health of generations to come. The goal of this research was to implement the pilot dissemination and describe the findings in the context of the Quality Implementation Framework. The objectives were to report outcomes of the iCook 4-H pilot dissemination, identify factors that promoted or inhibited successful dissemination, and provide suggestions QIF-based suggestion for improvement of future iCook 4-H dissemination and implementation. Careful attention to detail was paid in earlier stages of the iCook study while developing the iCook 4-H three-pronged approach of program, process, and fidelity evaluation to be consistent and reliable over time. This system of evaluation generates data on effectiveness of the iCook program (which was adressed in the iCook intervention study). In the context of dissemination and implementation it also illuminates the successes and failures in program packaging and determines if actual program delivery aligns with intended program delivery. Process evaluation results of the iCook 4-H pilot dissemination showed that both youth and adult participants identified the key components (concrete as well as abstract) of the program which is an indicator of efficacy. Program evaluation analysis demonstrated significantly increased scores from pre to post intervention in overall outcome measures (and the majority of youth subscales) 87.44±10.57 to 90.89±6.98 in adults and 180.26±29.74 to 200.10±28.67 in youth. Fidelity evaluations demonstrated that sites maintained high attendance (average of 91%) and participants were highly engaged in sessions (session averages of 3-4 on a 1-4 scale). Through third-party fidelity assessment, leaders were categorized as effective to highly effective (3.3-4 on a 1-4 scale) and were able to cover session materials and meet objectives within or below the intended session duration. Based on this assessment, the resources provided to leaders were deemed sufficient. While novel and well designed, this three-pronged approach to evaluation was not intended to serve as a complete dissemination and implementation (D&I) plan. Significant exploration into dissemination and implementation strategies and frameworks was not completed prior to the pilot dissemination study. By evaluating the iCook 4-H pilot dissemination through the lens of the Quality Implementation Framework, a myriad of potential strategies for improvement of iCook 4-H D&I were discovered. Suggested avenues for improvement of future dissemination and implementation include: creation of a resource/needs/fit assessment, creation… Advisors/Committee Members: Adrienne White, Angela Myracle, Kathryn Yerxa.

Subjects/Keywords: International and Community Nutrition

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APA (6th Edition):

Randall, J. L. (2016). Preparing for Effective Program Dissemination and Implementation: An Analysis of Problems and Proposals for the iCook 4-H Program. (Masters Thesis). University of Maine. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/etd/2548

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Randall, Jodi L. “Preparing for Effective Program Dissemination and Implementation: An Analysis of Problems and Proposals for the iCook 4-H Program.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Maine. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/etd/2548.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Randall, Jodi L. “Preparing for Effective Program Dissemination and Implementation: An Analysis of Problems and Proposals for the iCook 4-H Program.” 2016. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Randall JL. Preparing for Effective Program Dissemination and Implementation: An Analysis of Problems and Proposals for the iCook 4-H Program. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Maine; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/etd/2548.

Council of Science Editors:

Randall JL. Preparing for Effective Program Dissemination and Implementation: An Analysis of Problems and Proposals for the iCook 4-H Program. [Masters Thesis]. University of Maine; 2016. Available from: https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/etd/2548


University of Maine

2. Cutting, Kathryn. Identification of High-Risk Food Coping Strategies of Maine Food Pantry Clients.

Degree: MS, Food Science and Human Nutrition, 2019, University of Maine

Food coping strategies are strategies adopted by individuals in order to obtain enough food for themselves and their family. Food coping strategies can range from using coupons (couponing) and buying in bulk to skipping meals and stealing food. Although not all strategies are considered to be high risk, all strategies should be accounted for so that nutrition education programming caters to strategies that individuals are employing. This topic has not been widely researched in the United States. The purpose of this study was to identify common food coping strategies of food pantry clients across nine counties in Maine, explore identified behaviors related to risky coping strategies through focus group discussions, and make recommendations for future nutrition education programming. Common food coping strategies were identified through a survey that was developed using the Coping Strategies Index: Field Methods Manual along with prior research involving food coping strategies. The forty-six item Food Coping Survey was administered at food pantries in nine Maine counties and participants were recruited as a convenience sample at those food pantries. Survey inclusion criteria were being at least eighteen years of age and receiving food from one of the participating food pantries. A total of 566 surveys were completed. The two most common strategies were saving leftovers for another meal (reported by 93.1% of respondents) and buying generic or store-brand food items (used by 92.4%). The most common risky food coping strategies were skipping meals or not eating and eating out of date/expired food items. Focus groups were coordinated to further investigate the use of out of date/expired food. Four focus groups consisting of 59 total food pantry clients were conducted in three counties in Maine. Focus group discussion topics included food pantry staple items, decisions regarding using out of date/expired food and how to tell if something has ‘gone bad,’ and where participants go to find nutrition-related information. The focus groups were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Many individuals checked the date on food items they were purchasing at the store or receiving from the pantry; however, in terms of out of date food items, many individuals said they still eat non-perishable items after their expiration date. The focus group discussions indicated that individuals would benefit from education on what to look for in both perishable and non-perishable items to decide whether or not they were still safe to eat. The information obtained from both the Food Coping Survey and the focus group discussions will inform nutrition education programs and food pantry organizations throughout the state of Maine about topics to improve food security, reduce food safety risks, and minimize food waste. Advisors/Committee Members: Mary Ellen Camire, Kathryn Yerxa, Kathleen Savoie.

Subjects/Keywords: food insecurity; food safety; nutrition education; Nutrition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cutting, K. (2019). Identification of High-Risk Food Coping Strategies of Maine Food Pantry Clients. (Masters Thesis). University of Maine. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/etd/3027

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cutting, Kathryn. “Identification of High-Risk Food Coping Strategies of Maine Food Pantry Clients.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Maine. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/etd/3027.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cutting, Kathryn. “Identification of High-Risk Food Coping Strategies of Maine Food Pantry Clients.” 2019. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Cutting K. Identification of High-Risk Food Coping Strategies of Maine Food Pantry Clients. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Maine; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/etd/3027.

Council of Science Editors:

Cutting K. Identification of High-Risk Food Coping Strategies of Maine Food Pantry Clients. [Masters Thesis]. University of Maine; 2019. Available from: https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/etd/3027


University of Maine

3. Perkins, Sarah A. Assessing the Effectiveness of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program on Diet Quality as Measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2005.

Degree: MS, Food Science and Human Nutrition, 2019, University of Maine

Background:The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is a federally funded program through the United States Department of Agriculture that offers nutrition education to low income families across the U.S. Purpose:This study assessed the effectiveness of Maine EFNEP on food-related behavior change and diet quality as measured by the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI). This study also explored the relationship between the results on the HEI and participation in food assistance programs such as Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), as well as the number of hours spent in the program. Methodology:This study was a pre-post-secondary analysis of data gathered from WebNEERS, the database utilized by EFNEP. Diet recall data from fiscal years 2013-2016 were utilized to derive a healthy eating index score and sub-scores for each food group. T-tests and Ordinary Least Squares regressions were used to analyze data. Statistical analysis was conducted using STATA Special Edition 14.1. Results:Total HEI score and sub-scores improved pre- to post-EFNEP at the 1% level, except for saturated fat, which improved at the 5% level. Sodium and total grains scores decreased post-EFNEP (p=.003) and (p=.05) respectively. Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation had no effect on HEI scores. Less than 7 hours in the program was associated with a smaller improvement in total HEI score (p=.05) and a reduction in the sodium score (p=.03), when compared to spending 7-16 hours in the program. Conclusion:EFNEP is effective in improving the diet quality of Maine participants Advisors/Committee Members: Mona Therrien, Kathryn Yerxa, Angela Daley.

Subjects/Keywords: food; nutrition; EFNEP; healthy eating index; diet quality; adult nutrition; nutrition education; Human and Clinical Nutrition; International and Community Nutrition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Perkins, S. A. (2019). Assessing the Effectiveness of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program on Diet Quality as Measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2005. (Masters Thesis). University of Maine. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/etd/3049

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Perkins, Sarah A. “Assessing the Effectiveness of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program on Diet Quality as Measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2005.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Maine. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/etd/3049.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Perkins, Sarah A. “Assessing the Effectiveness of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program on Diet Quality as Measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2005.” 2019. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Perkins SA. Assessing the Effectiveness of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program on Diet Quality as Measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2005. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Maine; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/etd/3049.

Council of Science Editors:

Perkins SA. Assessing the Effectiveness of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program on Diet Quality as Measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2005. [Masters Thesis]. University of Maine; 2019. Available from: https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/etd/3049

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