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You searched for +publisher:"University of Louisville" +contributor:("Woodruff-Borden, Janet"). Showing records 1 – 19 of 19 total matches.

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University of Louisville

1. Kertz, Sarah Jane. Worry in children : proposal and test of a cognitive model.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Louisville

 Although worry is common in children, little is known about its development and maintenance. The current study reviews several areas of the literature to inform… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Worry; Generalized anxiety; Children; Cognitive

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APA (6th Edition):

Kertz, S. J. (2011). Worry in children : proposal and test of a cognitive model. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/738 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/738

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kertz, Sarah Jane. “Worry in children : proposal and test of a cognitive model.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/738 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/738.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kertz, Sarah Jane. “Worry in children : proposal and test of a cognitive model.” 2011. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Kertz SJ. Worry in children : proposal and test of a cognitive model. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2011. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/738 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/738.

Council of Science Editors:

Kertz SJ. Worry in children : proposal and test of a cognitive model. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2011. Available from: 10.18297/etd/738 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/738


University of Louisville

2. Hosey, Ryan Patrick. Metacognitive processes in social anxiety : a path analysis.

Degree: PhD, 2012, University of Louisville

 Social anxiety is prevalent and debilitating. Contemporary models of social anxiety posit that negative, self-focused thought aids in the maintenance of social anxiety symptoms. Although… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Metacognition; Post-event processing; Social anxiety; Anticipatory processing; Perseverative thought; Path analysis

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APA (6th Edition):

Hosey, R. P. (2012). Metacognitive processes in social anxiety : a path analysis. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/637 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/637

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hosey, Ryan Patrick. “Metacognitive processes in social anxiety : a path analysis.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/637 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/637.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hosey, Ryan Patrick. “Metacognitive processes in social anxiety : a path analysis.” 2012. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Hosey RP. Metacognitive processes in social anxiety : a path analysis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2012. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/637 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/637.

Council of Science Editors:

Hosey RP. Metacognitive processes in social anxiety : a path analysis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2012. Available from: 10.18297/etd/637 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/637


University of Louisville

3. Schrock, Matthew David Hartman. A model of resilience in children at risk for the development of anxiety.

Degree: PhD, 2012, University of Louisville

 Anxiety is a common and debilitating disorder in children. Until recently, research in the field of child anxiety has focused on the identification of specific… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Child; anxiety; resilience; temperament; family

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APA (6th Edition):

Schrock, M. D. H. (2012). A model of resilience in children at risk for the development of anxiety. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/1282 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1282

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schrock, Matthew David Hartman. “A model of resilience in children at risk for the development of anxiety.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/1282 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1282.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schrock, Matthew David Hartman. “A model of resilience in children at risk for the development of anxiety.” 2012. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Schrock MDH. A model of resilience in children at risk for the development of anxiety. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2012. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1282 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1282.

Council of Science Editors:

Schrock MDH. A model of resilience in children at risk for the development of anxiety. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2012. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1282 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1282

4. Williams, Sarah Ramsey. Modeling risk for the development of child anxiety : the role of parent emotion socialization practices, children's emotional competence, and physiological responsiveness.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Louisville

 The prevalence of child anxiety is high and anxiety disorders are often left untreated throughout childhood and adolescence. Many studies have focused on the role… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Child anxiety; Emotion understanding; Emotion socialization; Cardiac reactivity; Emotion regulation

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APA (6th Edition):

Williams, S. R. (2013). Modeling risk for the development of child anxiety : the role of parent emotion socialization practices, children's emotional competence, and physiological responsiveness. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/1579 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1579

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Williams, Sarah Ramsey. “Modeling risk for the development of child anxiety : the role of parent emotion socialization practices, children's emotional competence, and physiological responsiveness.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/1579 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1579.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Williams, Sarah Ramsey. “Modeling risk for the development of child anxiety : the role of parent emotion socialization practices, children's emotional competence, and physiological responsiveness.” 2013. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Williams SR. Modeling risk for the development of child anxiety : the role of parent emotion socialization practices, children's emotional competence, and physiological responsiveness. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2013. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1579 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1579.

Council of Science Editors:

Williams SR. Modeling risk for the development of child anxiety : the role of parent emotion socialization practices, children's emotional competence, and physiological responsiveness. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2013. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1579 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1579


University of Louisville

5. Altman, Jennifer K. Cross-validation of the body compassion scale in a sample of women in perimenopause.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Louisville

  This study is a cross-validation of the Body Compassion Scale (BCS) to confirm its factor structure and to assess concurrent validity in women in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cross-validation; body compassion scale; perimenopause; women; Clinical Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Altman, J. K. (2018). Cross-validation of the body compassion scale in a sample of women in perimenopause. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/3059 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3059

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Altman, Jennifer K. “Cross-validation of the body compassion scale in a sample of women in perimenopause.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/3059 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3059.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Altman, Jennifer K. “Cross-validation of the body compassion scale in a sample of women in perimenopause.” 2018. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Altman JK. Cross-validation of the body compassion scale in a sample of women in perimenopause. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2018. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/3059 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3059.

Council of Science Editors:

Altman JK. Cross-validation of the body compassion scale in a sample of women in perimenopause. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2018. Available from: 10.18297/etd/3059 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3059


University of Louisville

6. Walerius, Danielle M. Emotion socialization and families of children with and without ADHD.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Louisville

  Emotional competence (EC) represents several distinct emotional skills found to be strongly associated with children’s socioemotional outcomes. EC is thought to develop through a… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: ADHD; emotion socialization; parenting; Child Psychology; Clinical Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Walerius, D. M. (2017). Emotion socialization and families of children with and without ADHD. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2872 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2872

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Walerius, Danielle M. “Emotion socialization and families of children with and without ADHD.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/2872 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2872.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Walerius, Danielle M. “Emotion socialization and families of children with and without ADHD.” 2017. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Walerius DM. Emotion socialization and families of children with and without ADHD. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2017. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2872 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2872.

Council of Science Editors:

Walerius DM. Emotion socialization and families of children with and without ADHD. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2017. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2872 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2872


University of Louisville

7. Henderson, Danielle R. Interaction style of mothers of young children with Williams syndrome and relations with child expressive vocabulary.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Louisville

  Children of a given age vary widely in their expressive vocabulary abilities. One factor that is related to child expressive vocabulary ability is the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Developmental Psychology; Social and Behavioral Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Henderson, D. R. (2017). Interaction style of mothers of young children with Williams syndrome and relations with child expressive vocabulary. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2774 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2774

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Henderson, Danielle R. “Interaction style of mothers of young children with Williams syndrome and relations with child expressive vocabulary.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/2774 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2774.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Henderson, Danielle R. “Interaction style of mothers of young children with Williams syndrome and relations with child expressive vocabulary.” 2017. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Henderson DR. Interaction style of mothers of young children with Williams syndrome and relations with child expressive vocabulary. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2017. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2774 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2774.

Council of Science Editors:

Henderson DR. Interaction style of mothers of young children with Williams syndrome and relations with child expressive vocabulary. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2017. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2774 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2774


University of Louisville

8. Crawford-Zelli, Nicole A. Anxiety in children with Williams syndrome : association with negative reactivity, self-regulation, and sensory modulation.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Louisville

  Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a submicroscopic deletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23 (Hillier et al., 2003). This… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psychiatry and Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Crawford-Zelli, N. A. (2013). Anxiety in children with Williams syndrome : association with negative reactivity, self-regulation, and sensory modulation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2280 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2280

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crawford-Zelli, Nicole A. “Anxiety in children with Williams syndrome : association with negative reactivity, self-regulation, and sensory modulation.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/2280 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2280.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crawford-Zelli, Nicole A. “Anxiety in children with Williams syndrome : association with negative reactivity, self-regulation, and sensory modulation.” 2013. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Crawford-Zelli NA. Anxiety in children with Williams syndrome : association with negative reactivity, self-regulation, and sensory modulation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2013. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2280 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2280.

Council of Science Editors:

Crawford-Zelli NA. Anxiety in children with Williams syndrome : association with negative reactivity, self-regulation, and sensory modulation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2013. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2280 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2280


University of Louisville

9. Affrunti, Nicholas William. The roles of anxious rearing, negative affect, and effortful control in a model of risk for child perfectionism.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Louisville

  Our understanding of perfectionism and its developmental trajectory and impact on children has experienced a recent growth. Research has shown that child perfectionism is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: perfectionism; development; temperament; parenting; effortful control; Clinical Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Affrunti, N. W. (2017). The roles of anxious rearing, negative affect, and effortful control in a model of risk for child perfectionism. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2739 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2739

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Affrunti, Nicholas William. “The roles of anxious rearing, negative affect, and effortful control in a model of risk for child perfectionism.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/2739 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2739.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Affrunti, Nicholas William. “The roles of anxious rearing, negative affect, and effortful control in a model of risk for child perfectionism.” 2017. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Affrunti NW. The roles of anxious rearing, negative affect, and effortful control in a model of risk for child perfectionism. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2017. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2739 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2739.

Council of Science Editors:

Affrunti NW. The roles of anxious rearing, negative affect, and effortful control in a model of risk for child perfectionism. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2017. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2739 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2739


University of Louisville

10. Hart, Mara Ann. Exploring a multifactorial, clinical model of thought disorder : application of a dimensional, transdiagnostic approach.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Louisville

  Background: Bleuler saw thought disorder as the core defining feature of psychotic phenomena, reflective of the “splitting of the psychic functions” that occurred when,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: psychosis; thought disorder; dimensionality; Clinical Psychology; Mental Disorders; Psychiatric and Mental Health; Psychological Phenomena and Processes

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APA (6th Edition):

Hart, M. A. (2017). Exploring a multifactorial, clinical model of thought disorder : application of a dimensional, transdiagnostic approach. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2740 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2740

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hart, Mara Ann. “Exploring a multifactorial, clinical model of thought disorder : application of a dimensional, transdiagnostic approach.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/2740 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2740.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hart, Mara Ann. “Exploring a multifactorial, clinical model of thought disorder : application of a dimensional, transdiagnostic approach.” 2017. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Hart MA. Exploring a multifactorial, clinical model of thought disorder : application of a dimensional, transdiagnostic approach. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2017. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2740 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2740.

Council of Science Editors:

Hart MA. Exploring a multifactorial, clinical model of thought disorder : application of a dimensional, transdiagnostic approach. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2017. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2740 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2740


University of Louisville

11. Zimmaro, Lauren Ann. Understanding the relationship between positive affect and cortisol in lung cancer patients.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Louisville

  Positive psychobiological processes within lung cancer patients are drastically understudied. This dissertation explores the nature of positive affect (PA) and potential associations with diurnal… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cortisol; lung cancer; positive affect; cancer patient; Clinical Psychology; Health Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Zimmaro, L. A. (2018). Understanding the relationship between positive affect and cortisol in lung cancer patients. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/3047 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3047

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zimmaro, Lauren Ann. “Understanding the relationship between positive affect and cortisol in lung cancer patients.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/3047 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3047.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zimmaro, Lauren Ann. “Understanding the relationship between positive affect and cortisol in lung cancer patients.” 2018. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Zimmaro LA. Understanding the relationship between positive affect and cortisol in lung cancer patients. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2018. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/3047 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3047.

Council of Science Editors:

Zimmaro LA. Understanding the relationship between positive affect and cortisol in lung cancer patients. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2018. Available from: 10.18297/etd/3047 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3047


University of Louisville

12. Davis, Darlene M. Repetitive negative thinking styles and first-semester academic performance: psychological risk and resilience among low-income college students.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Louisville

  College students face significant mental health and academic challenges their first academic year. The college transition period can be stressful. In addition, students are… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: psychological risk; college transition; worry; rumination; poverty; college student retention; Clinical Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Davis, D. M. (2018). Repetitive negative thinking styles and first-semester academic performance: psychological risk and resilience among low-income college students. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/3137 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3137

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Davis, Darlene M. “Repetitive negative thinking styles and first-semester academic performance: psychological risk and resilience among low-income college students.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/3137 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3137.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Davis, Darlene M. “Repetitive negative thinking styles and first-semester academic performance: psychological risk and resilience among low-income college students.” 2018. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Davis DM. Repetitive negative thinking styles and first-semester academic performance: psychological risk and resilience among low-income college students. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2018. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/3137 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3137.

Council of Science Editors:

Davis DM. Repetitive negative thinking styles and first-semester academic performance: psychological risk and resilience among low-income college students. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2018. Available from: 10.18297/etd/3137 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3137


University of Louisville

13. Petrie, Jenny Marie. A culturally-sensitive model of the development of child anxiety.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Louisville

  Explanatory models significantly enhance the understanding of etiological influences that place children at risk for anxiety, yet little is known about processes that promote… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: anxiety; children; developmental psychopathology; African American; resilience; Clinical Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Petrie, J. M. (2015). A culturally-sensitive model of the development of child anxiety. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2337 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2337

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Petrie, Jenny Marie. “A culturally-sensitive model of the development of child anxiety.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/2337 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2337.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Petrie, Jenny Marie. “A culturally-sensitive model of the development of child anxiety.” 2015. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Petrie JM. A culturally-sensitive model of the development of child anxiety. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2015. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2337 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2337.

Council of Science Editors:

Petrie JM. A culturally-sensitive model of the development of child anxiety. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2015. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2337 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2337


University of Louisville

14. Gerstenecker, Adam Tyler. Taking clinical judgment out of the equation : a call for the standardization of MCI diagnostic criteria and construction of a model to predict conversion to dementia.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Louisville

  Although the diagnostic criteria for mild cognitive impairment have evolved considerably since their inception, they remain varied and able to be interpreted and implemented… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Gerstenecker, A. T. (2014). Taking clinical judgment out of the equation : a call for the standardization of MCI diagnostic criteria and construction of a model to predict conversion to dementia. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/490 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/490

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gerstenecker, Adam Tyler. “Taking clinical judgment out of the equation : a call for the standardization of MCI diagnostic criteria and construction of a model to predict conversion to dementia.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/490 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/490.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gerstenecker, Adam Tyler. “Taking clinical judgment out of the equation : a call for the standardization of MCI diagnostic criteria and construction of a model to predict conversion to dementia.” 2014. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Gerstenecker AT. Taking clinical judgment out of the equation : a call for the standardization of MCI diagnostic criteria and construction of a model to predict conversion to dementia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2014. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/490 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/490.

Council of Science Editors:

Gerstenecker AT. Taking clinical judgment out of the equation : a call for the standardization of MCI diagnostic criteria and construction of a model to predict conversion to dementia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2014. Available from: 10.18297/etd/490 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/490


University of Louisville

15. Richards, Allyn Elizabeth. A culturally-sensitive cognitive model of worry in African American youth.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Louisville

  Our understanding of worry in children and adolescents has been increasingly enhanced over the past decade through the downward extension of adult cognitive models.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American children; worry; intolerance of uncertainty; cognitive factors; sociocultural factors; Child Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Richards, A. E. (2016). A culturally-sensitive cognitive model of worry in African American youth. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2523 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2523

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Richards, Allyn Elizabeth. “A culturally-sensitive cognitive model of worry in African American youth.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/2523 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2523.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Richards, Allyn Elizabeth. “A culturally-sensitive cognitive model of worry in African American youth.” 2016. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Richards AE. A culturally-sensitive cognitive model of worry in African American youth. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2016. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2523 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2523.

Council of Science Editors:

Richards AE. A culturally-sensitive cognitive model of worry in African American youth. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2016. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2523 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2523


University of Louisville

16. Leyfer, Ovsanna. Anxiety disorders in children with Williams syndrome, their mothers, and their siblings : implications for the etiology of anxiety disorders.

Degree: PhD, 2007, University of Louisville

  Genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of anxiety disorders. Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic disorder caused by a deletion on chromosome… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Anxiety disorders; Mothers; Siblings; Williams syndrome; Anxiety; Etiology; Genetics; Developmental disorders

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Leyfer, O. (2007). Anxiety disorders in children with Williams syndrome, their mothers, and their siblings : implications for the etiology of anxiety disorders. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/821 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/821

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Leyfer, Ovsanna. “Anxiety disorders in children with Williams syndrome, their mothers, and their siblings : implications for the etiology of anxiety disorders.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/821 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/821.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Leyfer, Ovsanna. “Anxiety disorders in children with Williams syndrome, their mothers, and their siblings : implications for the etiology of anxiety disorders.” 2007. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Leyfer O. Anxiety disorders in children with Williams syndrome, their mothers, and their siblings : implications for the etiology of anxiety disorders. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2007. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/821 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/821.

Council of Science Editors:

Leyfer O. Anxiety disorders in children with Williams syndrome, their mothers, and their siblings : implications for the etiology of anxiety disorders. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2007. Available from: 10.18297/etd/821 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/821


University of Louisville

17. Harvison, Kyle William. Using auditory evoked brain responses to detect anxious vulnerabilities in neonates.

Degree: PhD, 2006, University of Louisville

 Anxiety disorders are prevalent in both adult and child populations, and are associated with significant economic and psychosocial costs. There are clearly familial patterns of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Auditory evoked brain responses; Anxious; Vulnerabilities; Neonates

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harvison, K. W. (2006). Using auditory evoked brain responses to detect anxious vulnerabilities in neonates. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/581 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/581

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harvison, Kyle William. “Using auditory evoked brain responses to detect anxious vulnerabilities in neonates.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/581 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/581.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harvison, Kyle William. “Using auditory evoked brain responses to detect anxious vulnerabilities in neonates.” 2006. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Harvison KW. Using auditory evoked brain responses to detect anxious vulnerabilities in neonates. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2006. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/581 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/581.

Council of Science Editors:

Harvison KW. Using auditory evoked brain responses to detect anxious vulnerabilities in neonates. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2006. Available from: 10.18297/etd/581 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/581


University of Louisville

18. Chapman, L. Kevin. Anxiety and control in African American families.

Degree: PhD, 2006, University of Louisville

 To investigate the effects of anxiety and ethnicity on parental control as well as the effects ethnicity, anxiety, and parental control have on child diagnostic… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African-American; Ethnicity; Parent-child interaction; Anxiety; Control; Families

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chapman, L. K. (2006). Anxiety and control in African American families. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/233 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/233

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chapman, L Kevin. “Anxiety and control in African American families.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/233 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/233.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chapman, L Kevin. “Anxiety and control in African American families.” 2006. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Chapman LK. Anxiety and control in African American families. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2006. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/233 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/233.

Council of Science Editors:

Chapman LK. Anxiety and control in African American families. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2006. Available from: 10.18297/etd/233 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/233

19. Getz, Brittney Rose. Testing the chronic care model for depression in homebound older adults.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Louisville

  Homebound older adults are a unique population of older adults with many chronic illnesses and complex care needs (Qui et al., 2010). Depression is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Clinical Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Getz, B. R. (2015). Testing the chronic care model for depression in homebound older adults. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2255 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2255

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Getz, Brittney Rose. “Testing the chronic care model for depression in homebound older adults.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed July 23, 2019. 10.18297/etd/2255 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2255.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Getz, Brittney Rose. “Testing the chronic care model for depression in homebound older adults.” 2015. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Getz BR. Testing the chronic care model for depression in homebound older adults. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2015. [cited 2019 Jul 23]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2255 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2255.

Council of Science Editors:

Getz BR. Testing the chronic care model for depression in homebound older adults. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2015. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2255 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2255

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