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You searched for +publisher:"University of Louisville" +contributor:("Snyder, Kate E."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Louisville

1. Dickinson, Emily R., 1974-. Cultural capital and the family-school mesosystem : a multiple groups analysis of school-based parent involvement types and their relations with early student achievement.

Degree: PhD, Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, Counseling, and College Student Personnel, 2014, University of Louisville

This dissertation study explored the relationship between school-based parent involvement and early reading outcomes by positing that different types of parent involvement activities reflect access to different forms of cultural capital and therefore should be analyzed as separate constructs. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) techniques were used to establish the factor structure underlying measures of school-based parent involvement available in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort of 2011 (ECLS-K: 2011). Also of interest were the variations in the amount of participation in different types of involvement between families from various sociocultural backgrounds, as well as the relationships between different types of parent involvement and early reading achievement outcomes among these groups. Before such comparisons were made, a series of multiple groups CFA models were run to establish measurement invariance among the parent involvement factors. Data were analyzed across racial/ethnic, parent education, parent occupational prestige, and primary language subgroups. Two achievement outcomes, reading IRT scores and teacher literacy ratings, were modeled separately, to determine if the observed relationships held across achievement outcomes. Finally, all analyses were conducted separately for two school types: public and non-public schools. Results indicated three components of school-based parent involvement that aligned with differences in cultural capital requirements. Subgroup differences in average values of a subset of the parent involvement factors were observed, as well as differences in the relationships between the parent involvement types and student achievement outcomes. Differences in these relationships were also observed across school type. Several directions for future research based on these findings are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Adelson, Jill Lynn, Gross, Jacob P. K., Snyder, Kate E., Valentine, Jeffrey C..

Subjects/Keywords: Educational Psychology; Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dickinson, Emily R., 1. (2014). Cultural capital and the family-school mesosystem : a multiple groups analysis of school-based parent involvement types and their relations with early student achievement. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/1717 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1717

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dickinson, Emily R., 1974-. “Cultural capital and the family-school mesosystem : a multiple groups analysis of school-based parent involvement types and their relations with early student achievement.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed February 18, 2019. 10.18297/etd/1717 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1717.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dickinson, Emily R., 1974-. “Cultural capital and the family-school mesosystem : a multiple groups analysis of school-based parent involvement types and their relations with early student achievement.” 2014. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Dickinson, Emily R. 1. Cultural capital and the family-school mesosystem : a multiple groups analysis of school-based parent involvement types and their relations with early student achievement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1717 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1717.

Council of Science Editors:

Dickinson, Emily R. 1. Cultural capital and the family-school mesosystem : a multiple groups analysis of school-based parent involvement types and their relations with early student achievement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2014. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1717 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1717


University of Louisville

2. Bellinger, David Bradley. Learning from science lectures : students remember more and make better inferences when they complete skeletal outlines compared to other guided notes.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Louisville

It is common for students to take notes during lectures, but the accuracy and completeness of these notes is highly questionable. Therefore, instructors must make an important decision – should they provide their students with lecture notes? If so, how complete should the notes be and in what format? The present experiments examined how note format and degree of support impacted the encoding benefit of note-taking. In Experiment 1, undergraduate students listened to brief audio-recorded science lectures (Human blood, N = 42; Human ear, N = 36) and completed skeletal outlines (requiring students to conceptually organize the information using the structure indicated by the notes) or cloze notes (requiring students to record key words that were deleted from the notes). In Experiment 2, students (N = 120) completed outlines or cloze notes with varying degrees of support, thus providing students with more or less complete notes. Both experiments found that, compared to other guided notes, completing skeletal outlines (i.e., outlines with minimal support) led to the highest cognitive load and the least complete notes, but also the most accurate free recall and inference responses. Consistent with the material appropriate processing framework, the mnemonic benefits derived from completing guided notes were constrained to notes that induce a type of semantic processing which complements that afforded by the lecture. Advisors/Committee Members: DeCaro, Marci S., Cashon, Cara H., Cashon, Cara H., Lyle, Keith B., Pani, John R., Snyder, Kate E..

Subjects/Keywords: Desirable Difficulty; Lecture Method; Encoding Variability; Metacognition; Deep Processing; Generation Effect (Learning); Cognitive Psychology; Educational Methods

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bellinger, D. B. (2016). Learning from science lectures : students remember more and make better inferences when they complete skeletal outlines compared to other guided notes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2513 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2513

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bellinger, David Bradley. “Learning from science lectures : students remember more and make better inferences when they complete skeletal outlines compared to other guided notes.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed February 18, 2019. 10.18297/etd/2513 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2513.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bellinger, David Bradley. “Learning from science lectures : students remember more and make better inferences when they complete skeletal outlines compared to other guided notes.” 2016. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Bellinger DB. Learning from science lectures : students remember more and make better inferences when they complete skeletal outlines compared to other guided notes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2016. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2513 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2513.

Council of Science Editors:

Bellinger DB. Learning from science lectures : students remember more and make better inferences when they complete skeletal outlines compared to other guided notes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2016. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2513 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2513

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