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You searched for +publisher:"University of Louisville" +contributor:("Roof, Judith"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Louisville

1. Mercer, Lynda Kristian. American emergency : catastrophe and culture in the U.S.A., from the Civil War to Hurricane Katrina.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Louisville

This dissertation examines socio-cultural experiences of national disasters in the United States as they intersect with political rhetorics of democracy, to understand the forms and functions of state power as it is mediated through famous historical figures. Tracing the manifold possibilities from within and around the disruptive spacetimes of disaster, which sociologist Harvey Molotch describes in their ultimate function as societal “rationalizers” (371), I analyze catastrophes as contested spaces and histories that often get situated as variations on the “man vs. nature/god/man” binaries in public discourse. By analyzing the deployment of, and response to, such explanatory frameworks in the United States since the nineteenth century, this project complicates and exposes processes of power and transgression as they relate to democracy and capitalism. This project is divided into three chapters, to formulate a partial sketch of the modern historical trajectory of the nation as it has navigated into and out of catastrophe—each chapter dealing with a distinct disaster that resulted in large-scale public casualties that were broadcast nationally (and in most cases globally), and which dramatically altered the composition of land and the populations who inhabited it: The Civil War, The Dust Bowl, and Hurricane Katrina. Roughly 70 years spans the gaps between each of the three catastrophes, and each chapter analyzes not just historical events of the disasters themselves, but the political and cultural environments of these phenomena as they affected spatio-temporal features of society and history before and after they occurred. To explicate these relationships and to further interrogate the ways in which the markers of race and gender have figured within these dynamics and as they continue to figure today, I include contemporary sites of excavation through analysis of present-day film and television productions as they reify particular components of disaster, biopower, and capitalism as distinctly “American” democracies. I deploy these interpretations in ways that speak to historical and fictional representations of American civilization(s) but to speak as well to elements within the larger constellation of connections in this project and produce additional perspectives on ideas like citizenship, progress, democracy, and power as they have been reformulated in popular discourse. Advisors/Committee Members: Ryan, Susan, Jaffe, Aaron, Bertacco, Simona, Roof, Judith.

Subjects/Keywords: America; catastrophe; democracy; emergency; U.S.; heterotopia; American Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mercer, L. K. (2017). American emergency : catastrophe and culture in the U.S.A., from the Civil War to Hurricane Katrina. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2633 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2633

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mercer, Lynda Kristian. “American emergency : catastrophe and culture in the U.S.A., from the Civil War to Hurricane Katrina.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed April 12, 2021. 10.18297/etd/2633 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2633.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mercer, Lynda Kristian. “American emergency : catastrophe and culture in the U.S.A., from the Civil War to Hurricane Katrina.” 2017. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Mercer LK. American emergency : catastrophe and culture in the U.S.A., from the Civil War to Hurricane Katrina. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2633 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2633.

Council of Science Editors:

Mercer LK. American emergency : catastrophe and culture in the U.S.A., from the Civil War to Hurricane Katrina. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2017. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2633 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2633


University of Louisville

2. Hutabarat-Nelson, Tiffany M. Fantastical body narratives : cosplay, performance, and gender diversity.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Louisville

This dissertation aims to explore how the phenomenon of cosplay has been able to produce and sustain a diversity of gender expression due to its emergence from an activity-based community that emphasizes creative play. This creative energy is manifested through cosplay as an active, ritualized practice in which gender diversity is invited to be realized as a distinct possibility, resulting in a display of a full range of masculinities and femininities as well as crossplays and genderbend cosplays. I argue that cosplay can therefore be understood as a phenomenon that destabilizes the gender binary—its active practice promotes the production and interpretation of gender as being within a spectrum for cosplayers and their audiences alike. I also assert that the degree of diversity of gender expression observed through cosplay at fandom conventions is better accounted for as social change achieved through ritualized practice rather than as a subversive performance. This dissertation hopes to demonstrate that the sustainment of diversity of gender expression hinges upon the interdependent relationship between a ritualized, repeated practice and the individuals, community and space that promote it. Advisors/Committee Members: Hall, Ann, Gagne, Patricia, Gagne, Patricia, Story, Kaila, Roof, Judith.

Subjects/Keywords: cosplay; performance; gender diversity; gender studies; cultural studies; Critical and Cultural Studies; Gender and Sexuality; Performance Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hutabarat-Nelson, T. M. (2017). Fantastical body narratives : cosplay, performance, and gender diversity. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2669 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2669

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hutabarat-Nelson, Tiffany M. “Fantastical body narratives : cosplay, performance, and gender diversity.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed April 12, 2021. 10.18297/etd/2669 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2669.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hutabarat-Nelson, Tiffany M. “Fantastical body narratives : cosplay, performance, and gender diversity.” 2017. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hutabarat-Nelson TM. Fantastical body narratives : cosplay, performance, and gender diversity. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2669 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2669.

Council of Science Editors:

Hutabarat-Nelson TM. Fantastical body narratives : cosplay, performance, and gender diversity. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2017. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2669 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2669

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