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You searched for +publisher:"University of Louisville" +contributor:("Jones, Ricky L."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Louisville

1. Ronald, Jessica Elizabeth. Alternative performances of race and gender in hip-hop music : nerdcore counterculture.

Degree: MA, 2012, University of Louisville

In his documentary entitled, Nerdcore For Life, director Dan Lamoureux described Nerdcore as a "powerful social collision between hip hop and geek culture". Born on the Internet, Nerdcore Hip-Hop is rap music made by geeks, for geeks and covers such traditionally "nerdy" topics such as comic books, video games, science fiction, anime, technology, etc. Though it has existed online for almost a decade, only recently has Nerdcore gone from being an Internet fad to an underground cultural phenomenon. This paper investigated how hegemonic constructions of race and gender within both the dominant public sphere and hip-hop culture are subverted and reinvented within Nerdcore counterculture. The "birth" narrative of the Nerdcore movement, as depicted in film documentaries Nerdcore For Life and Nerdcore Rising, provides a public platform for self-proclaimed nerds to assert cultural power and agency through hip hop music—even while the performance of white, nerdy masculinity, made all the more nerdy by contrast with mainstream hip hop's machismo, subverts that power. The Nerdcore genre has created a transgressive space within the underground hip-hop movement in which marginalized geek culture can claim ownership of an identity alternative to mainstream expectations of gender and race. The content of Nerdcore differentiates itself from mainstream hip-hop by speaking to the heart of "geek" culture, but also utilizes hip-hop's ability to express the oppressed experiences of today's youth. Nerdcore challenges the traditional misogynistic, hyper-masculine mainstream construction associated with both white and black masculinities, and offers a safe space in which to perform alternative masculinities. Nerdcore artists offer a unique new strategy for achieving authenticity as white performers in hip-hop counterculture-a conscious subversion. The geek identity presented by Nerdcore does not attempt to recreate gender and racial stereotypes visible in hip-hop nor does it parody hip-hop culture. Nerdcore performers have developed a space to offer a conscious narrative of subversion for alternative identity performances in hip-hop music. Advisors/Committee Members: Jones, Ricky L..

Subjects/Keywords: Whiteness; Hip hop; Masculinity; Nerdcore

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ronald, J. E. (2012). Alternative performances of race and gender in hip-hop music : nerdcore counterculture. (Masters Thesis). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/1231 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1231

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ronald, Jessica Elizabeth. “Alternative performances of race and gender in hip-hop music : nerdcore counterculture.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Louisville. Accessed March 19, 2019. 10.18297/etd/1231 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1231.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ronald, Jessica Elizabeth. “Alternative performances of race and gender in hip-hop music : nerdcore counterculture.” 2012. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Ronald JE. Alternative performances of race and gender in hip-hop music : nerdcore counterculture. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Louisville; 2012. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1231 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1231.

Council of Science Editors:

Ronald JE. Alternative performances of race and gender in hip-hop music : nerdcore counterculture. [Masters Thesis]. University of Louisville; 2012. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1231 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1231


University of Louisville

2. Spears, Shannon. The problem of the twenty-first century in the Cherokee Nation is the problem of the color-line : how the Cherokee Freedmen have articulated a sense of cultural identity and citizenship claims over time.

Degree: MA, 2014, University of Louisville

This research investigates the Cherokee Freedmen, who are people of African-American descent and peoples of mixed African-American and Native American descent, who were once enslaved by Cherokees in the Cherokee Nation, and who have articulated their identity and tribal citizenship status as Cherokee Natives in the Cherokee Nation. Upon emancipation, the Cherokee Nation adopted the Cherokee Freedmen as equal citizens in the Cherokee Nation under article nine from the Treaty of 1866, but this changed after citizens were recorded on the Dawes Rolls based upon blood quantum. The theoretical framework of this research is Antonio Gramsci’s theoretical perspective of cultural hegemony and core-periphery theory. Due to cultural hegemony, these citizenship rolls are still what articulate tribal citizenship status in the Cherokee Nation today. This research uses an Afro-Indigenous epistemological approach. Also, this Master’s thesis addresses the identity politics behind citizenship status today for the descendants of Freedmen as well as legitimizes their authenticity as Cherokee Native citizens, for their citizenship status has been revoked from the Cherokee Nation, because they do not meet the required blood quantum. Advisors/Committee Members: Jones, Ricky L., Best, Latrica, Phillips, Selene.

Subjects/Keywords: Race; Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Spears, S. (2014). The problem of the twenty-first century in the Cherokee Nation is the problem of the color-line : how the Cherokee Freedmen have articulated a sense of cultural identity and citizenship claims over time. (Masters Thesis). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/1364 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1364

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Spears, Shannon. “The problem of the twenty-first century in the Cherokee Nation is the problem of the color-line : how the Cherokee Freedmen have articulated a sense of cultural identity and citizenship claims over time.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Louisville. Accessed March 19, 2019. 10.18297/etd/1364 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1364.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Spears, Shannon. “The problem of the twenty-first century in the Cherokee Nation is the problem of the color-line : how the Cherokee Freedmen have articulated a sense of cultural identity and citizenship claims over time.” 2014. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Spears S. The problem of the twenty-first century in the Cherokee Nation is the problem of the color-line : how the Cherokee Freedmen have articulated a sense of cultural identity and citizenship claims over time. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Louisville; 2014. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1364 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1364.

Council of Science Editors:

Spears S. The problem of the twenty-first century in the Cherokee Nation is the problem of the color-line : how the Cherokee Freedmen have articulated a sense of cultural identity and citizenship claims over time. [Masters Thesis]. University of Louisville; 2014. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1364 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1364


University of Louisville

3. Valentine, Kristen T. Punishing the 'other' : race, ethnicity, and the American justice system.

Degree: MA, 2006, University of Louisville

This thesis is an examination of the relationship between race and ethnicity and the American justice system. It is a comparative case study of the racial dimensions of the War on Drugs in the domestic criminal justice system and the ethnic dimensions of the War on Terror through an examination of the prison and prisoners at Guantanamo Bay. This thesis is about building bridges between domestic and international conceptions of justice with a focus on human rights. Central to this project is an exploration of similar process of white fear, racialization, and dehumanization black and Arab/Muslim men experience under the American justice system. Finally, this thesis explores the political ramifications of wars on ideas (the War on Drugs and the War on Terror) and how that effects punishment. Advisors/Committee Members: Jones, Ricky L..

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Valentine, K. T. (2006). Punishing the 'other' : race, ethnicity, and the American justice system. (Masters Thesis). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/1479 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1479

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Valentine, Kristen T. “Punishing the 'other' : race, ethnicity, and the American justice system.” 2006. Masters Thesis, University of Louisville. Accessed March 19, 2019. 10.18297/etd/1479 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1479.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Valentine, Kristen T. “Punishing the 'other' : race, ethnicity, and the American justice system.” 2006. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Valentine KT. Punishing the 'other' : race, ethnicity, and the American justice system. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Louisville; 2006. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1479 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1479.

Council of Science Editors:

Valentine KT. Punishing the 'other' : race, ethnicity, and the American justice system. [Masters Thesis]. University of Louisville; 2006. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1479 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1479

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