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You searched for +publisher:"University of Louisville" +contributor:("Gross, Jacob P. K."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Louisville

1. Noltemeyer, J. Patrick, 1979-. Job satisfaction of professional staff and administrators within the associated colleges of the south : a study of Herzberg’s duality theory of motivation in higher education.

Degree: PhD, Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, Counseling, and College Student Personnel, 2014, University of Louisville

This study examined the ability of four groups of factors to predict the job satisfaction levels of fulltime, exempt, professional staff at four institutions of higher education within the associated Colleges of the South consortium. Based on a similar study of professionals in higher education conducted by Smerek and Peterson (2007), this study used hierarchical multiple regression to determine the amount of variability explained by each group of factors according to the conceptual model. The conceptual model for this study, as well as the study by Smerek and Peterson, was based on the theory of Frederick Herzberg (1959), an industrial organizational psychologist who described job satisfaction and job dissatisfaction as disparate variables. Professional staff members received an anonymous web-based survey that measured levels of job satisfaction and collected information on personal and work characteristics. The survey also collected employee responses to two categories of variables – motivator factors and hygiene factors - identified by Herzberg as components of job satisfaction and job dissatisfaction. Results of this survey suggested that four variables accounted for statistically significant portions of job satisfaction – responsibility, work itself, effective supervisor, and recognition. One variable had a negative statistically significant relationship with job satisfaction – core values. The combination of statistically significant factors supports the acceptance of one of this study’s hypotheses, that the Herzberg duality theory of job satisfaction is not supported in a higher education context. The job satisfaction levels of fulltime professional exempt employees in higher education matter; not only have higher levels of job satisfaction been connected to higher levels of efficiency and effectiveness, increases in job satisfaction have been linked to more positive work environments, improved campus culture, higher employee retention and ultimately with institutions identified as “Great Places to Work For.” The importance of job satisfaction in the higher education environment and was the impetus for this examination of Herzberg’s duality theory of motivation. The results of this study are encouraging for leaders in higher education as they suggest opportunities for increasing job satisfaction that may be of relatively low cost while creating high impact. Advisors/Committee Members: Hirschy, Amy, Gross, Jacob P. K., Pregliasco, Bridgette, Shuck, Brad.

Subjects/Keywords: Higher Education Administration

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APA (6th Edition):

Noltemeyer, J. Patrick, 1. (2014). Job satisfaction of professional staff and administrators within the associated colleges of the south : a study of Herzberg’s duality theory of motivation in higher education. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/1748 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1748

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Noltemeyer, J. Patrick, 1979-. “Job satisfaction of professional staff and administrators within the associated colleges of the south : a study of Herzberg’s duality theory of motivation in higher education.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed February 16, 2019. 10.18297/etd/1748 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1748.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Noltemeyer, J. Patrick, 1979-. “Job satisfaction of professional staff and administrators within the associated colleges of the south : a study of Herzberg’s duality theory of motivation in higher education.” 2014. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Noltemeyer, J. Patrick 1. Job satisfaction of professional staff and administrators within the associated colleges of the south : a study of Herzberg’s duality theory of motivation in higher education. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1748 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1748.

Council of Science Editors:

Noltemeyer, J. Patrick 1. Job satisfaction of professional staff and administrators within the associated colleges of the south : a study of Herzberg’s duality theory of motivation in higher education. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2014. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1748 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1748


University of Louisville

2. Dickinson, Emily R., 1974-. Cultural capital and the family-school mesosystem : a multiple groups analysis of school-based parent involvement types and their relations with early student achievement.

Degree: PhD, Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, Counseling, and College Student Personnel, 2014, University of Louisville

This dissertation study explored the relationship between school-based parent involvement and early reading outcomes by positing that different types of parent involvement activities reflect access to different forms of cultural capital and therefore should be analyzed as separate constructs. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) techniques were used to establish the factor structure underlying measures of school-based parent involvement available in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort of 2011 (ECLS-K: 2011). Also of interest were the variations in the amount of participation in different types of involvement between families from various sociocultural backgrounds, as well as the relationships between different types of parent involvement and early reading achievement outcomes among these groups. Before such comparisons were made, a series of multiple groups CFA models were run to establish measurement invariance among the parent involvement factors. Data were analyzed across racial/ethnic, parent education, parent occupational prestige, and primary language subgroups. Two achievement outcomes, reading IRT scores and teacher literacy ratings, were modeled separately, to determine if the observed relationships held across achievement outcomes. Finally, all analyses were conducted separately for two school types: public and non-public schools. Results indicated three components of school-based parent involvement that aligned with differences in cultural capital requirements. Subgroup differences in average values of a subset of the parent involvement factors were observed, as well as differences in the relationships between the parent involvement types and student achievement outcomes. Differences in these relationships were also observed across school type. Several directions for future research based on these findings are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Adelson, Jill Lynn, Gross, Jacob P. K., Snyder, Kate E., Valentine, Jeffrey C..

Subjects/Keywords: Educational Psychology; Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dickinson, Emily R., 1. (2014). Cultural capital and the family-school mesosystem : a multiple groups analysis of school-based parent involvement types and their relations with early student achievement. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/1717 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1717

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dickinson, Emily R., 1974-. “Cultural capital and the family-school mesosystem : a multiple groups analysis of school-based parent involvement types and their relations with early student achievement.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed February 16, 2019. 10.18297/etd/1717 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1717.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dickinson, Emily R., 1974-. “Cultural capital and the family-school mesosystem : a multiple groups analysis of school-based parent involvement types and their relations with early student achievement.” 2014. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Dickinson, Emily R. 1. Cultural capital and the family-school mesosystem : a multiple groups analysis of school-based parent involvement types and their relations with early student achievement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1717 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1717.

Council of Science Editors:

Dickinson, Emily R. 1. Cultural capital and the family-school mesosystem : a multiple groups analysis of school-based parent involvement types and their relations with early student achievement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2014. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1717 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1717

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