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You searched for +publisher:"University of Louisville" +contributor:("Evans-Andris, Melissa"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Phillips, Aaron. I had to learn that on my own : successful first-generation, low-income college students from rural areas at an urban institution.

Degree: PhD, Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, Counseling, and College Student Personnel, 2015, University of Louisville

First-generation and low-income college students have been at a greater risk of attrition and have graduated at lower rates compared to other students for some time. Despite this, however, there are first-generation and low-income students who have been successful and have graduated. Unfortunately, there has been a lack of research focused on successful students, particularly those who are also from a rural background. The purpose of this study is to reveal what strategies, practices, actions, and behaviors low income, first-generation students from a rural background employ and engage in to persist and be academically successful. A qualitative methodology was chosen for this study, and more specifically, interviews of study participants were conducted. Single participant interviews were conducted in order to maintain the strict confidentiality of the participants and to obtain information that occurred at previous points in time. There were five major themes of the study. The first was the importance of the environment of the institution, followed the impact of one’s first-generation and low income status on their campus experiences. Next, a third theme was the strengths participants brought with them to campus from a rural background, followed by the significance of participants building their own support networks on campus. Finally, participants reported a great deal of support to attend college from a variety of sources. Related findings included the need to build their own support network on campus and that a rural upbringing provides students with many assets and strengths that can be beneficial at the university. Related findings also included that the university is generally doing relatively well for students who are from first-generation and low-income backgrounds, although improvements can still be made. Finally, the study found that participants, overall, were involved and engaged on campus. Student affairs professionals and higher education administrators must look for ways to further increase the likelihood that first-generation, low-income students from rural areas will persist, be academically successful, and ultimately graduate. Essentially, understanding the unique characteristics such as strengths and assets as well as challenges and obstacles is paramount in working with this student population. Advisors/Committee Members: Hirschy, Amy, Evans-Andris, Melissa, Pregliasco, Bridgette, Warnock, Deborah.

Subjects/Keywords: Counseling

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APA (6th Edition):

Phillips, A. (2015). I had to learn that on my own : successful first-generation, low-income college students from rural areas at an urban institution. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2003 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2003

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Phillips, Aaron. “I had to learn that on my own : successful first-generation, low-income college students from rural areas at an urban institution.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed February 16, 2019. 10.18297/etd/2003 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2003.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Phillips, Aaron. “I had to learn that on my own : successful first-generation, low-income college students from rural areas at an urban institution.” 2015. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Phillips A. I had to learn that on my own : successful first-generation, low-income college students from rural areas at an urban institution. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2003 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2003.

Council of Science Editors:

Phillips A. I had to learn that on my own : successful first-generation, low-income college students from rural areas at an urban institution. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2015. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2003 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2003


University of Louisville

2. Bridges, Annette W., 1953-. Ready child, ready school : educator perceptions of child and school success indicators and ready school practices.

Degree: PhD, Department of Leadership, Foundations, and Human Resource Education, 2012, University of Louisville

In this study, the researcher considered educator perceptions of child readiness for school and school readiness for children conceptualized within the central constructs of the ready child and the ready school. The skills and abilities that children bring to the school are equally as important as the services and supports that the school brings to the child. The researcher’s intention in conducting this study was to investigate whether the differences existed in perceptions about ready child and ready school indicators and the implementation of ready school practices between educators working in successful schools and educators working in less successful schools. A nonexperimental, quantitative design was employed with cross-sectional data analysis of educator perceptions collected through a survey. The analytical procedures included correlational analyses and nonparametric statistical tests. The sample consisted of 185 Kentucky educators who included 43 principals, 82 Kindergarten teachers, and 60 preschool teachers. The selection was intentional to ensure that the educators represented schools with scores above the state average (ASA) and schools with scores below the state average (BSA) on the 2011–2012 Kentucky Performance Rating for Educational Progress (K-PREP). The researcher found significant differences between the ASA and BSA educator (a) rankings of ready child indicators of health and physical well-being and approaches to learning; (b) rankings of the ready school indicator transition; and (c) rating of the teacher ready school practices. The findings suggest that school leaders, including staff, should consider examining their perceptions of the ready child and ready school, and the implementation of ready school practices to ensure that every child who enters Kindergarten has optimal learning opportunities for successful school experiences. Advisors/Committee Members: Evans-Andris, Melissa, Carpenter, Bradley Wayne, Tretter, Thomas, Jean-Marie, Gaetane.

Subjects/Keywords: Educational Leadership

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bridges, Annette W., 1. (2012). Ready child, ready school : educator perceptions of child and school success indicators and ready school practices. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/1725 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1725

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bridges, Annette W., 1953-. “Ready child, ready school : educator perceptions of child and school success indicators and ready school practices.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed February 16, 2019. 10.18297/etd/1725 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1725.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bridges, Annette W., 1953-. “Ready child, ready school : educator perceptions of child and school success indicators and ready school practices.” 2012. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Bridges, Annette W. 1. Ready child, ready school : educator perceptions of child and school success indicators and ready school practices. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1725 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1725.

Council of Science Editors:

Bridges, Annette W. 1. Ready child, ready school : educator perceptions of child and school success indicators and ready school practices. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2012. Available from: 10.18297/etd/1725 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/1725


University of Louisville

3. Ronald, Ann Hayes. Interdisciplinary palliative care teams : insights and experiences of chaplain interns and social work interns.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Louisville

In 2030, the population of those 65 years and older is projected to be 72 million, which will represent 20% of adults in the United States. This large group will have affected many aspects of our society, including families and healthcare providers. Decisions about medical care, caregiving, financial concerns, and new circumstances in living arrangements will be made. Perhaps no aspect of life will be as important as how one spends the end-of-life. Importantly, the care that individuals receive is likely an important aspect of this end-of-life experience. Interdisciplinary palliative care teams provide effective and comprehensive end-of-life care for patients and their families; however, barriers exist that often impede their effectiveness. The current qualitative study explored some of the often-reported barriers evidenced in the literature base; more specifically, the study explored written reflections of chaplain and social work interns after they completed clinical placement with an interdisciplinary palliative care team. Findings from the data revealed five themes (i.e., Learning Lessons, Disappointment, Being There, Dealing with Family Matters, and Making Hard Decisions), which aligned with both groups of interns. Two themes were identified that describe unique chaplain or social work discipline-specific roles and interventions (i.e., Intern as Existential Comforter and Intern as Psychosocial Resourcer). The meaning and importance of the findings in the context of the literature base are discussed. Directions for future research for palliative care and interdisciplinary teams are offered. Suggestions for diverse providers, counselors, and counselor training programs are provided. Advisors/Committee Members: Hooper, Lisa M., Estes, Eileen O., Estes, Eileen O., Evans-Andris, Melissa, Head, Barbara A..

Subjects/Keywords: interdisciplinary teams; palliative care; Counseling; Social and Behavioral Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ronald, A. H. (2015). Interdisciplinary palliative care teams : insights and experiences of chaplain interns and social work interns. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2309 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2309

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ronald, Ann Hayes. “Interdisciplinary palliative care teams : insights and experiences of chaplain interns and social work interns.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed February 16, 2019. 10.18297/etd/2309 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2309.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ronald, Ann Hayes. “Interdisciplinary palliative care teams : insights and experiences of chaplain interns and social work interns.” 2015. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Ronald AH. Interdisciplinary palliative care teams : insights and experiences of chaplain interns and social work interns. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2309 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2309.

Council of Science Editors:

Ronald AH. Interdisciplinary palliative care teams : insights and experiences of chaplain interns and social work interns. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2015. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2309 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2309

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