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You searched for +publisher:"University of Louisville" +contributor:("Adams, Tomarra"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Louisville

1. Caton, Erica. Standing in the intersection : using Photovoice to understand the lived experience of black gay college students attending predominantly white postsecondary institutions.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Louisville

The intersection of multiple oppressed identities is characterized by the compounded effects of victimization, intimidation and continued marginalization by dominant culture groups in society. Despite a growing body of knowledge about the individual experiences of racial and sexual minorities, there remains a lack of understanding of the unique life experiences of individuals with intersecting oppressed identities, specifically Black gay youth. Failure or inability to recognize, understand and take action in response to the needs of Black gay youth in college, perpetuates a culture of oppression that compromises the physical and mental well-being, and the academic success of these students. Engaging Black gay college students in a Photovoice project affords said students the opportunity to document their everyday experiences in photographic images, tell the stories of their lives, and identify the strengths and needs of their community for campus policy makers, educators, practitioners and researchers. While it represents a trusted approach in understanding the lived experiences of marginalized and oppressed people, Wang and Burris’ (1994) participatory action research method Photovoice is underutilized as a means of understanding the lived experience of Black gay college students. This dissertation study utilized a modified Photovoice project as well as other qualitative and quantitative research methods to explore the lived experience of Black gay college students, the meaning they attribute to said experiences and subsequent role performance. The students in this study demonstrated a keen awareness of the complexity and compounded effects of their identities and resilience in the face of harassment and repeated microaggressions while identifying and employing multiple pathways to personal, academic and professional success. Advisors/Committee Members: Lawson, Thomas, Adams, Tomarra, Adams, Tomarra, Bell, Shannon, Perry, Armon.

Subjects/Keywords: photovoice; black; gay; critical consciousness; college; student; Community-Based Research; Gender and Sexuality; Higher Education Administration; Quantitative, Qualitative, Comparative, and Historical Methodologies; Race and Ethnicity; Social Work

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Caton, E. (2015). Standing in the intersection : using Photovoice to understand the lived experience of black gay college students attending predominantly white postsecondary institutions. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2295 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2295

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Caton, Erica. “Standing in the intersection : using Photovoice to understand the lived experience of black gay college students attending predominantly white postsecondary institutions.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed April 12, 2021. 10.18297/etd/2295 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2295.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Caton, Erica. “Standing in the intersection : using Photovoice to understand the lived experience of black gay college students attending predominantly white postsecondary institutions.” 2015. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Caton E. Standing in the intersection : using Photovoice to understand the lived experience of black gay college students attending predominantly white postsecondary institutions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2295 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2295.

Council of Science Editors:

Caton E. Standing in the intersection : using Photovoice to understand the lived experience of black gay college students attending predominantly white postsecondary institutions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2015. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2295 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2295


University of Louisville

2. Seay, Amberli A. Fatal attraction : intimate partner violence among black LGBTQ relationships.

Degree: MA, 2019, University of Louisville

Social workers play a pivotal role in intervening in instances of intimate partner violence. It is imperative that social work intervention education is relevant, competent and inclusive. In this study, a content analysis is conducted on the true-crime documentary series, Fatal Attraction. Fatal Attraction targets Black audiences and sheds light on Black victim-survivors and perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV). The documentaries in this series act as a resource to understanding representation and treatment of Black LGBTQ. The following research questions are explored and discussed: 1. To what degree are Black LGBTQ victims and perpetrators of IPV represented in media? In what ways are Black LGBTQ IPV experiences portrayed on television that may affect how those who interact with them; 2. In what way(s) can interventionists and key personnel adequately intervene in incidences of intimate partner violence; 3. What does it mean to competently intervene in incidences of IPV? It was concluded that an intersectional framework is necessary for social work intervention, education, and training. A policy which reaffirms IPV victim-survivors would provide clients a safe listening ear without judgment. Lastly, social workers must advocate for equitable treatment among all people within legal and court systems. Advisors/Committee Members: Rajack-Talley, Theresa, Adams, Tomarra, Adams, Tomarra, Miller, Shawnise, Story, Kaila.

Subjects/Keywords: intimate partner violence; LGBTQ; social work; black; African American; intersectionality; Africana Studies; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies; Social Work

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Seay, A. A. (2019). Fatal attraction : intimate partner violence among black LGBTQ relationships. (Masters Thesis). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/3168 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3168

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Seay, Amberli A. “Fatal attraction : intimate partner violence among black LGBTQ relationships.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Louisville. Accessed April 12, 2021. 10.18297/etd/3168 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3168.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Seay, Amberli A. “Fatal attraction : intimate partner violence among black LGBTQ relationships.” 2019. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Seay AA. Fatal attraction : intimate partner violence among black LGBTQ relationships. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Louisville; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/3168 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3168.

Council of Science Editors:

Seay AA. Fatal attraction : intimate partner violence among black LGBTQ relationships. [Masters Thesis]. University of Louisville; 2019. Available from: 10.18297/etd/3168 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/3168


University of Louisville

3. Keen Crook, Alexis N. Assessing cultural competence in a mental health outpatient facility.

Degree: MA, 2016, University of Louisville

Cultural competence is a concept that has been thoroughly investigated in healthcare, but there is a dearth of literature and research on this topic as it pertains to mental health services. In healthcare, research has shown that a lack of cultural competence is directly linked to high levels of misdiagnoses, mistrust of healthcare and professionals, and overall poor health in minority populations. Using the Campinha-Bacote model for cultural competence in health care, I explore how cultural competence is defined and operationalized in an outpatient mental health facility. I hypothesize that, similar to research addressing cultural competency in healthcare systems, cultural competence within this mental health facility is not adequately defined and carried out in its daily operations. In order to assess the potential institutional knowledge and awareness of cultural competence, I initially analyzed all policies, procedures, and training documents of the organization. Next, I conducted 15 semi-structured qualitative interviews of various mental health professionals that worked in the outpatient facility in order to ascertain how each individual defined and employed cultural competence, if at all, throughout their work. In my findings, I discovered that there was no clear definition of cultural competence in any of the organizations handbooks or policies. Furthermore, I found that mental health professionals did not have a clear understanding of cultural competence or that cultural competence is an ongoing process. Lastly, I found that the facility offered no trainings or professional development courses on cultural competence. The information gathered from the study can be beneficial to the facility’s work with diverse populations and aid in future research directions on this subject. Advisors/Committee Members: Best, Latrica E., Adams, Tomarra A., Adams, Tomarra A., Jones, Ricky L., Perry, Armon R..

Subjects/Keywords: Cultural competence; Mental Health; African Americans; Health Disparities; Other Mental and Social Health

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Keen Crook, A. N. (2016). Assessing cultural competence in a mental health outpatient facility. (Masters Thesis). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2380 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2380

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Keen Crook, Alexis N. “Assessing cultural competence in a mental health outpatient facility.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Louisville. Accessed April 12, 2021. 10.18297/etd/2380 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2380.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Keen Crook, Alexis N. “Assessing cultural competence in a mental health outpatient facility.” 2016. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Keen Crook AN. Assessing cultural competence in a mental health outpatient facility. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Louisville; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2380 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2380.

Council of Science Editors:

Keen Crook AN. Assessing cultural competence in a mental health outpatient facility. [Masters Thesis]. University of Louisville; 2016. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2380 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2380

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