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You searched for +publisher:"University of KwaZulu-Natal" +contributor:("Pillay, Karen"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of KwaZulu-Natal

1. Ramlucken, Uraisha. Membrane permeability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

Degree: Biochemistry, 2014, University of KwaZulu-Natal

According to the 2012 UNAIDS global report, sub-Saharan Africa hosts 69% of the world’s total population living with HIV, South Africa being the most affected with a reported 24% incidence rate. To date, extensive research is being conducted globally, particularly involving anti-HIV treatment that targets the retroviral enzymes: reverse transcriptase, integrase and protease. The discovery of inhibitors to HIV protease which disrupts virion protein assembly has made this enzyme a prime target of anti-retroviral therapies, thus there exists a concerted research initiative to identify compounds with HIV protease inactivation potential. This study employs HIV protease that is isolated and purified from a genetically modified HIV protease overexpressing Escherichia coli strain to monitor the inhibitory capacity of new lead compounds. Optimized growth conditions for HIV protease production displayed that the use of chemically defined media resulted in higher yields of the enzyme. Recent research studies have shown that peptide-based cage and glycosylated compounds displayed HIV protease inhibitor activity in cell free enzymatic reactions that are comparable to commercially available HIV protease inhibitors. However, in contrast it has also been reported that these inhibitors are inactive in whole T-cell assays, when employing HIV infected CD4 cells. It is a well-known fact that potential new chemical entities that do not possess oral bioavailability, in terms of their absorption properties, are not successful candidates within the drug discovery industry. Following this, the current study was designed to determine if inefficient membrane permeability of these promising anti-HIV protease lead compounds could result in their inactivity in whole T-cell assays. Two different methods were considered, a cell-based method using the Madin Darby Canine Kidney strain I (MDCKI) cell line and a non-cell based method, the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA). MDCKI cells have been extensively used to form monolayers that mimic human intestinal membranes whilst the PAMPA utilizes an artificial lipid membrane composition on a filter support. Data from permeability assays using the novel chemically synthesized inhibitors have been compared to commercially available drugs, antipyrine, metoprolol and caffeine, which displayed efficient membrane permeability characteristics, thereby validating the assay. The results indicated that novel cage-derived and glycosylated peptide inhibitors do not possess sufficient passive diffusion properties which may explain their inactivity in whole T-cell assays. Advisors/Committee Members: Govender, Patrick (advisor), Pillay, Karen (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Biochemistry.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ramlucken, U. (2014). Membrane permeability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. (Thesis). University of KwaZulu-Natal. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10413/11372

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ramlucken, Uraisha. “Membrane permeability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.” 2014. Thesis, University of KwaZulu-Natal. Accessed October 22, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/10413/11372.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ramlucken, Uraisha. “Membrane permeability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.” 2014. Web. 22 Oct 2017.

Vancouver:

Ramlucken U. Membrane permeability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of KwaZulu-Natal; 2014. [cited 2017 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10413/11372.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ramlucken U. Membrane permeability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. [Thesis]. University of KwaZulu-Natal; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10413/11372

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of KwaZulu-Natal

2. Nene, Njabulo Eugene. Yeast encapsulation for bioethanol production.

Degree: Biochemistry, 2015, University of KwaZulu-Natal

The bioethanol production industry is faced with hurdles such as uncovering cheap and abundantly available fermentation substrates, as well as yeast strains possessing high ethanol tolerance properties. Cane molasses is a substrate that sufficiently fits the aforementioned description and this has catapulted its use in bioethanol production. However, the downside to employing cane molasses as a fermentation substrate under laboratory conditions for comparative fermentation studies is nutrient composition variability in different batches. This has prompted the development of a standardised chemically defined molasses medium that facilitates the generation of more consistent and reliable fermentation data. In the first aspect of this study, a chemically defined molasses medium was formulated based on nutrient composition data of 10 different cane molasses batches as provided by the South African Sugar Research Institute (SASRI). The ability of laboratory and industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains to ferment chemically defined molasses medium and industrially-derived cane molasses sourced from the Amatikulu, Felixton and Gledhow South African-based sugar mills was evaluated. The batch fermentation of the chemically defined molasses medium supplemented with yeast extract by BY4743 (laboratory strain), dry yeast (baker’s yeast), Angel and cream yeast (distiller’s yeast) were similar to those attained in batch fermentations of cane molasses in terms of fermentation kinetic profiles (sugar conversion, ethanol titer, yield and productivities). It was also observed irrespective of the fermentation substrate involved that cream yeast produced the highest ethanol output followed by angel yeast, dry yeast and then BY4743. These results seem to suggest that the chemically defined molasses medium containing yeast extract can be employed as a standardised laboratory medium. Increased bioethanol yield is commercially attractive to relevant fermentation-based industries. In this regard, the immobilization of yeast by cell encapsulation has been touted as a tool which may increase the yeast’s tolerance to higher ethanol levels. In this study, a strategy was developed in which the better performing Angel and cream yeast strains were immobilized in calcium alginate, alginate-chitosan, and low melting point agarose capsules. The fermentation efficiency in terms of ethanol production of encapsulated cells versus their free-suspended yeast cell counterparts was evaluated. The reusability of the capsules for more than one fermentation cycle was also investigated. The fermentation of Amatikulu and chemically defined molasses medium containing 10 g/L of yeast extract by Angel yeast encapsulated in low melting point agarose resulted in a 10% increase in bioethanol yields in comparison to their free-suspended Angel yeast counterparts. However, it was also observed that cream yeast fermentations with free-suspended and encapsulated cells generated similar fermentation profiles and bioethanol yields. Only alginate-chitosan and low melting… Advisors/Committee Members: Govender, Patrick (advisor), Ramchuran, Santosh (advisor), Pillay, Karen (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Biochemistry.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nene, N. E. (2015). Yeast encapsulation for bioethanol production. (Thesis). University of KwaZulu-Natal. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10413/12522

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nene, Njabulo Eugene. “Yeast encapsulation for bioethanol production.” 2015. Thesis, University of KwaZulu-Natal. Accessed October 22, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/10413/12522.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nene, Njabulo Eugene. “Yeast encapsulation for bioethanol production.” 2015. Web. 22 Oct 2017.

Vancouver:

Nene NE. Yeast encapsulation for bioethanol production. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of KwaZulu-Natal; 2015. [cited 2017 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10413/12522.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Nene NE. Yeast encapsulation for bioethanol production. [Thesis]. University of KwaZulu-Natal; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10413/12522

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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