Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Kansas" +contributor:("Shontz, Suzanne M"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Kansas

1. Frazer, Lance. Subchondral Bone Cysts - Filling the Void.

Degree: PhD, Bioengineering, 2019, University of Kansas

Subchondral bone cysts (SBCs) are voids that can occur in the bones of young horses, especially horses intended for performance. Believed to be caused by trauma or osteochondrosis, these defects most often occur in the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Current treatments for equine SBCs have poor outcomes and have not improved over the last several decades. The gold standard for surgical treatment consists of cyst debridement and grafting. However, radiographic healing is not often reported, and when it is, only 20% of horses exhibit full radiographic healing. A novel treatment strategy has been recently introduced that places a lag screw across the SBC and has demonstrated high rates of radiographic healing. However, the mechanics of how a transcondylar lag screw could enhance SBC healing are unknown. The goals of this study were to determine a plausible mechanism of SBC initiation and growth, as well as understand the mechanics of the transcondylar lag screw. A finite element modeling approach has been taken to examine the mechanics associated with SBCs. Using CT scans from young Thoroughbred horses, several finite element models have been developed for this study. The results of this study show that high-impact loading from gallop can cause stresses high enough to initiate bone damage in a healthy equine stifle joint. Additionally, once a small defect has manifested, stresses rise even higher and further damage is likely. Medial meniscus stress also increases with a MFC SBC, which suggests that secondary injury to the medial meniscus may be due to a disrupted load path through the MFC. Furthermore, it was determined that the transcondylar screw is able to heal SBCs by providing enough mechanical stimulus to the adjacent bone to promote bone formation. Not only is the stimulus for growth present, but the screw also aligns third principal stresses transverse to trabecular orientation across the cyst. This encourages bone to form across the void, as opposed to trabecular thickening, which results in the sclerosis typically seen in MFC SBCs. Lastly, it was determined that larger cysts respond best to the transcondylar screw. Full penetration of the screw into the cystic cavity provides the highest bone-forming stimulus, and also best aligns stresses across the void. This work demonstrates that trauma can initiate SBCs and that the transcondylar screw provides a unique mechanism to enhance healing. Since humans are susceptible to a wide range of bone defects that exhibit similar characteristic of an equine SBC, it is believed that there is huge potential for translational applications. Advisors/Committee Members: Fischer, Kenneth (advisor), Fischer, Kenneth J (cmtemember), Santschi, Elizabeth M (cmtemember), Maletsky, Lorin P (cmtemember), Shontz, Suzanne M (cmtemember), Hale, Richard D (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Biomechanics; Veterinary science; Health sciences; Equine Stifle; Finite Element Analysis; Knee; Osteoarthritis; Subchondral Bone Cysts; Transcondylar Screw

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Frazer, L. (2019). Subchondral Bone Cysts - Filling the Void. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/29652

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Frazer, Lance. “Subchondral Bone Cysts - Filling the Void.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/29652.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Frazer, Lance. “Subchondral Bone Cysts - Filling the Void.” 2019. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Frazer L. Subchondral Bone Cysts - Filling the Void. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/29652.

Council of Science Editors:

Frazer L. Subchondral Bone Cysts - Filling the Void. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/29652


University of Kansas

2. Jia, Feilin. Towards industrial large eddy simulation using the FR/CPR method.

Degree: PhD, Aerospace Engineering, 2019, University of Kansas

NASA’s 2030 CFD Vision calls for the development of accurate and efficient scale-resolving simulations for turbulent flow, such as large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS). This is primarily because the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach has failed to predict vortex-dominated flow involving large flow separations, e.g., flow through a jet engine or over aircraft near the edge of the flight envelope, i.e., during take-off and landing at high angles of attack. Although the DNS approach resolves all turbulence scales, it is too expensive in the foreseeable future for real world flow problems because of the disparate length and time scales in the flow. LES resolves the energetic large scales while modeling the smaller scales, so it provides a good compromise between accuracy and cost. As a result, LES is widely considered to be the method of choice for next generation CFD design tool. The major obstacle for LES is its considerable computational cost since unsteady 3D simulations need to be performed to obtain the mean flow quantities such as the drag and lift coefficients. In order to resolve the dominant scales in a turbulent flow, numerical methods used for LES should have low dissipation and dispersion errors. This means standard second order finite-volume methods are usually not accurate or efficient enough for LES applications. High-order methods (order of accuracy 2) have demonstrated their potential for LES and DNS in the past decade because of their low embedded numerical dissipation and dispersion errors. In the present study, we develop and demonstrate a recently developed high-order method, called flux reconstruction (FR) or correction procedure via reconstruction (CPR), for industrial LES. A major advantage of the FR/CPR method is its capability to handle unstructured mixed meshes, and its compactness and scalability, which is particularly desired on modern super-computers. We therefore address the following major pacing items in industrial LES in the present study: High-order methods Geometric flexibility Efficient time integration Efficient implementation on modern super computers Demonstration for real world applications Advisors/Committee Members: Taghavi, Ray (advisor), Wang, Z.J. (advisor), Taghavi, Ray (cmtemember), Wang, Z.J. (cmtemember), Farokhi, Saeed (cmtemember), Zheng, Zhongquan (cmtemember), Shontz, Suzanne M (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Aerospace engineering; computational fluid dynamics; correction procedure via reconstruction; flux reconstruction; high order method; implicit time scheme

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jia, F. (2019). Towards industrial large eddy simulation using the FR/CPR method. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/29660

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jia, Feilin. “Towards industrial large eddy simulation using the FR/CPR method.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/29660.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jia, Feilin. “Towards industrial large eddy simulation using the FR/CPR method.” 2019. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Jia F. Towards industrial large eddy simulation using the FR/CPR method. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/29660.

Council of Science Editors:

Jia F. Towards industrial large eddy simulation using the FR/CPR method. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/29660

.