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You searched for +publisher:"University of Kansas" +contributor:("Robins, Sarah K"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Kansas

1. Seals, Anastasia Margaret. Effects and Meaning: Metaphors as Implicit Speech Acts.

Degree: MA, Philosophy, 2014, University of Kansas

In this paper I show that the typical accounts of meaning do not provide us with what is most important about metaphors. The meaning of a metaphorical utterance is nothing more than what it says. What is important about metaphors looks more like effects, the realizations of significant or surprising similarities between objects they inspire in their interpreters. The effects may vary from interpreter to interpreter or even between interpretations done by the same interpreter at different times as long as there is something like a family resemblance among the core similarities noticed in each case. The use of a metaphor requires exploiting Grice's maxims of conversation and following certain conventions that parallel those required of other speech acts. Metaphors are best categorized as implicit speech acts because they rely on the illocutionary act of the utterance in the same way that jokes or insults do. What a metaphor communicates is more important than what it says. Advisors/Committee Members: Nutting, Eileen S (advisor), Robins, Sarah K (cmtemember), Grund, Peter J (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Philosophy; effects; meaning; metaphor; speech acts

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Seals, A. M. (2014). Effects and Meaning: Metaphors as Implicit Speech Acts. (Masters Thesis). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/16813

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Seals, Anastasia Margaret. “Effects and Meaning: Metaphors as Implicit Speech Acts.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Kansas. Accessed April 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/16813.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Seals, Anastasia Margaret. “Effects and Meaning: Metaphors as Implicit Speech Acts.” 2014. Web. 19 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Seals AM. Effects and Meaning: Metaphors as Implicit Speech Acts. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Kansas; 2014. [cited 2019 Apr 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/16813.

Council of Science Editors:

Seals AM. Effects and Meaning: Metaphors as Implicit Speech Acts. [Masters Thesis]. University of Kansas; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/16813


University of Kansas

2. Baldwin, Matthew. Bringing the past to the present: Temporal self-comparison processes moderate nostalgia’s effect on well-being.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2015, University of Kansas

This research tested the theory that the effect of nostalgia on well-being depends on temporal comparison processes. Five studies (N = 501) apply established models of self and social judgment and demonstrate that nostalgia is a resource for well-being when contextual variables prompt inclusion of the past self in current self-conceptions. Study 1 (n = 76) showed initial evidence that inclusion of the nostalgic (vs. ordinary) past self in the current self-concept leads to higher self-concept clarity. Study 2 (n = 78) aimed to replicate this pattern for well-being. Supporting hypotheses, recalling a nostalgic (vs. ordinary) memory led to higher psychological well-being when the past self was included in the current self-concept. Study 3 (n = 122) conceptualized inclusion as the tendency to focus on similarities (vs. differences) between the current and past selves, and experimentally demonstrated that nostalgia results in higher psychological well-being when a focus on similarities (vs. differences) is induced. Finally, Studies 4 (n = 145) and 5 (n = 80) examined broader contextual variables that were hypothesized to influence both inclusion and similarity focus mechanisms. In Study 4, recalling a nostalgic memory promoted well-being when a reflective (vs. evaluative) mindset was experimentally primed. In Study 5, individual differences in trait self-reflection moderated nostalgia’s contribution to well-being such that nostalgia (vs. control) resulted in higher well-being but particularly when trait self-reflection was high. Taken together, the current research establishes a cognitive mechanism that determines when and how nostalgia contributes to well-being and provides a richer understanding of nostalgia, temporal comparison processes, and mechanisms that maintain and enhance the self. Advisors/Committee Members: Biernat, Monica (advisor), Crandall, Christian S (cmtemember), Gillath, Omri (cmtemember), Landau, Mark J (cmtemember), Robins, Sarah K (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Social psychology; Autobiographical Memory; Nostalgia; Self and Identity; Temporal Comparison; Well-Being

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Baldwin, M. (2015). Bringing the past to the present: Temporal self-comparison processes moderate nostalgia’s effect on well-being. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/19012

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Baldwin, Matthew. “Bringing the past to the present: Temporal self-comparison processes moderate nostalgia’s effect on well-being.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed April 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/19012.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Baldwin, Matthew. “Bringing the past to the present: Temporal self-comparison processes moderate nostalgia’s effect on well-being.” 2015. Web. 19 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Baldwin M. Bringing the past to the present: Temporal self-comparison processes moderate nostalgia’s effect on well-being. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2015. [cited 2019 Apr 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/19012.

Council of Science Editors:

Baldwin M. Bringing the past to the present: Temporal self-comparison processes moderate nostalgia’s effect on well-being. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/19012


University of Kansas

3. Kittlaus, Jennifer Diane. The Natures of Pride and Shame.

Degree: PhD, Philosophy, 2016, University of Kansas

In this dissertation, I explore the natures of emotional pride and shame. Using elements from Hume’s discussion of pride and humility in Book 2 of the Treatise, as well as Gabriele Taylor’s analysis of pride and shame in Pride, Shame, and Guilt: Emotions of Self-Assessment, I argue against the view that pride and shame necessarily involve (global) self-evaluations. Put another way, I reject the view that pride and shame necessarily constitute one’s judging that one has experienced some gain or loss in status, respectively. Instead, I contend that they are best understood as constituting one’s being importantly satisfied or dissatisfied (respectively) with some (localized) aspect of an entity, whether oneself or an entity to which one stands in the (close) relation of ‘belonging.’ In addition, I emphasize that the evaluations involved in pride and shame are made in light of (or against the backdrop of) the emoter’s beliefs, desires, values, etc. I do not dispute the fact that others’ views may shape one’s own. Rather, I claim that experiences of pride and shame importantly reflect the emoter’s values, beliefs, desires, norms of expectations, etc. Finally, I stress that unless one is able to acknowledge that the entity in question (whether it be oneself or another) is capable of failing to meet one’s expectations, one cannot experience pride or shame. Notably, in the case of pride, unless one believes it is possible for the entity to fail to meet one's standards, one cannot truly feel satisfied that the entity in question met or exceeded one’s standards. Advisors/Committee Members: Bricke, John J (advisor), Frykholm, Erin A (cmtemember), Maley, Corey J (cmtemember), Robins, Sarah K (cmtemember), Smith Fischer, Iris (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Philosophy; Emotions; Hume; David; Pride; Shame; Taylor; Gabriele

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kittlaus, J. D. (2016). The Natures of Pride and Shame. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/21856

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kittlaus, Jennifer Diane. “The Natures of Pride and Shame.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed April 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/21856.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kittlaus, Jennifer Diane. “The Natures of Pride and Shame.” 2016. Web. 19 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Kittlaus JD. The Natures of Pride and Shame. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2016. [cited 2019 Apr 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/21856.

Council of Science Editors:

Kittlaus JD. The Natures of Pride and Shame. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/21856

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